Neuroscience

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  • Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

    The Neurocritic
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in the form of beautiful equations that are the envy of the softer sciences.xkcd: PurityThe enterprise…
  • Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic]

    Your Brain Health
    Sarah McKay
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:36 pm
    › With BIG thanks to EyeWire and Visually.  The post Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • See The Game Through The Eyes Of The Quarterback

    Sports Are 80 Percent Mental
    6 Aug 2014 | 1:57 pm
    Going into the start of football season, there is plenty of expert commentary on what makes up the “right stuff” when evaluating quarterbacks. Everything from arm strength to height to foot skills to the size of their hands was measured and dissected to find the magic combination of variables. While the body mechanics of delivering a football on target are vital, QBs rely even more on their vision both before and after the ball is snapped.It’s not just knowing where and when to look at an opposing defense but also understanding what to look for across the line. Defensive players are…
  • Nassim Taleb, The Precautionary Principle, and GMOs

    NeuroLogica Blog
    Steven Novella
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:24 am
    Nassim Taleb is a serious scholar of risk assessment, especially in the world of economics. So when he and two co-authors published a paper on the precautionary principle as it applies to genetically modified organisms it is worth taking seriously. That does not mean I have to agree with his conclusions, however. What I found was that Taleb’s argument is mathematically rigorous, although I think too absolute, but also is biologically naive. Here is his argument in a nutshell: The mathematical part if this – if we consider risk prevention, we must decide how much risk is…
  • Disco biscuits

    Mind Hacks
    vaughanbell
    25 Aug 2014 | 8:57 am
    This is a video of Professor Stephen Stahl, author of Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology, doing a DSM-5 themed version of Stayin’ Alive by the BeeGees.   After working out that, no, no-one has dropped acid in your morning Red Bull, you may notice that the professor busts some pretty respectable moves.   Link to video on YouTube (via @AllenFrancesMD)
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Training your brain to prefer healthy foods

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:34 am
    It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research.
  • How neurons in bats' brains ensure a safe flight

    1 Sep 2014 | 7:23 am
    Bats emit ultrasound pulses and measure the echoes reflected from their surroundings. They have an extremely flexible internal navigation system that enables them to do this. A study shows that when a bat flies close to an object, the number of active neurons in the part of a bat's brain responsible for processing acoustic information about spatial positioning increases. This information helps bats to react quickly and avoid obstacles.
  • Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching the skin.
  • Memory in silent neurons: How do unconnected neurons communicate?

    31 Aug 2014 | 12:03 pm
    According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received from other neurons, acts to stimulate the synapses. How is it that some neurons are caught up in the communication interplay even when they are barely connected? This is the chicken-or-egg puzzle of synaptic plasticity that a team is aiming to solve.
  • How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance

    29 Aug 2014 | 5:38 am
    How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades. The way networks of neurons connect and how individual cells react to incoming pulses in principle makes communication over large distances impossible. Scientists provide now a possible answer how the brain can function nonetheless: by exploiting the powers of resonance.
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • How to Teach Physics to Your Dog, Now With More “Quantum” [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:23 am
    If you’re making your weekly check of the ebook editions (a href=”http://www.amazon.com/How-Teach-Quantum-Physics-Your-ebook/dp/B002ZJCQT2/ref=la_B002BLLCF8_1_1_title_1_kin?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1409666953&sr=1-1″>Kindle, Nook) of my quantum book (I’m not the only one who regualrly looks at these, right?), you may have noticed a change: they’re no longer sporting the original black cover you’ll see in the right sidebar, but a new cover based on the smash hit UK edition. This isn’t a database glitch, but a new release, with a new cover and…
  • What is going on at the James Randi Educational Foundation? [Respectful Insolence]

    Orac
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:06 am
    Due to the holiday and suddenly being informed that my revised manuscript for a certain journal (more on that later) is needed NOW, I don’t have time for much of a post. However, a certain bit of bombshell landed over the weekend that should keep those of you interested in the skeptics’ movement (as I am) discussing until I finish “fixing” a final version of my manuscript. It came in the form of an announcement that appeared on the James Randi Educational Foundation (JREF) website: In order to achieve cost-savings and greater efficiency, the Los Angeles office of the…
  • Nordita Workshop for Science Writers: Wrap-Up [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:13 am
    I didn’t write a summary of the third day of “Quantum Boot Camp” to go with my Day One and Day Two summaries for a simple reason: I would’ve needed to do that on Saturday, and I spent Saturday in transit back to the US. More than that, though, it was harder to summarize than the other two days, because my talk was the middle of three, and thus I spent most of the first talk fiddling with my slides and fretting, and most of the third fighting off the post-talk adrenaline crash. Happily, Sedeer at Inspiring Science offers a summary of the first two talks, namely Larus…
  • Shades of Dr. Jones [Aardvarchaeology]

    Martin R
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:20 am
    I’ve read Marilyn Johnson’s forthcoming book Lives in Ruins. Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble. It’s a collection of lively and enthusiastic portraits of contemporary archaeologists in their professional environment. Some may find the tone a bit too enthusiastic, pantingly so in parts, but that’s a matter of taste. Archaeologists should arguably be thankful to have a friend like Marilyn Johnson. Still, she’s an outside observer of our tribe, and she approaches us from a very particular direction. Take her introductory statement that “Field…
  • A Labor Day look at state and local actions for worker health [The Pump Handle]

    Liz Borkowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:05 am
    As Celeste Monforton and I were putting together 2014 edition of The Year in U.S. Occupational Health and Safety (which she introduced yesterday), we noticed that a lot of the good news about workers winning better conditions was coming from cities and states. Victories include: Cities and states raise minimum wages: Thanks to laws passed over the past year, eight states and four other jurisdictions will have minimum wages at or above $10 per hour. (They’ll join cities that already have minimum wages at or above $10/hour, like San Francisco and San Jose.) Some of these jurisdictions…
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    Deric's MindBlog

  • Intergenerational transmission of emotional trauma.

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:57 am
    Interesting work from Debiec and Sullivan on how conditioned fear learning in a parent is transmitted to children: Despite clinical evidence that specific fear is transmitted across generations, we have little understanding of mechanisms. Here, we model social transmission of mother-to-infant fear in rodents. We show that maternal fear responses to a conditioned fear odor are sufficient to induce robust fear learning throughout infancy, with robust retention. Assessment of mechanism showed that maternal fear expression increases pups’ stress hormone corticosterone and amygdala activation to…
  • How could language have evolved?

    1 Sep 2014 | 4:25 am
    An eminent group of co-authors (Bolhuis, Tattersall, Chomsky, and Berwick) suggest that a simple core repeatable operation is the basis of all language. This open source article is a "must read" item for anyone interested in the structure and evolution of language, and I pass on just the abstract and a bit on the basic model: The evolution of the faculty of language largely remains an enigma. In this essay, we ask why. Language's evolutionary analysis is complicated because it has no equivalent in any nonhuman species. There is also no consensus regarding the essential nature of the language…
  • The origins of morality.

    29 Aug 2014 | 3:57 am
    Mark Johnson has generated some creative and seminal ideas in his books "The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason" and, with George Lakoff "Metaphors We Live By." I pass on a few clips from Les Beldo's review of his most recent book, "Morality for Humans Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science": Over the past 25 years, a growing number of cognitive scientists have taken it as their mission to find an empirical basis within brain science for the distinctive character of moral judgments. Investigators such as Marc Hauser, Steven Pinker,…
  • The stability of the authoritarian state.

    28 Aug 2014 | 3:15 am
    Science Magazine publishes comment on a fascinating article by King et al. who essentially reverse-engineer censorship in China to show that criticisms of the state, its leaders, and their policies are published, whereas posts about real-world events with collective action potential are censored. Criticism on the web, which was thought to be censored, is used by Chinese leaders to determine which officials are not doing their job of mollifying the people and need to be replaced. Here is the structured abstract from the article: Censorship has a long history in China, extending from the…
  • Early life anxiety in monkeys and humans correlates with connectivity between prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    27 Aug 2014 | 5:39 am
    A group of collaborators, mainly at the University of Wisconsin, including Ned Kalin and Richard Davidson, provide new information about the evolutionarily conserved brain network underlying extreme early-life anxiety: Some individuals are endowed with a biology that renders them more reactive to novelty and potential threat. When extreme, this anxious temperament (AT) confers elevated risk for the development of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. These disorders are highly prevalent, debilitating and can be challenging to treat. The high-risk AT phenotype is expressed similarly in…
 
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    Brain Blogger

  • Facing the Future

    Maria Goddard, MD
    1 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Nine years have passed since the first partial face transplant was performed in France but the questions regarding both the physical and psychological ramifications for patients remain. One of my first contributions to Brain Blogger examined the debate surrounding face transplantation, written in 2008 after the completion of the first partial procedure in the United States. A few days ago, GQ Magazine announced that Richard Norris, the recipient of the first successful complete face transplant, had been photographed and interviewed for the latest edition of the monthly publication. His…
  • The Hollywood Medical Reporter – Review of “Lucy”

    Daliah Leslie
    31 Aug 2014 | 2:10 pm
    It’s been a long time since I’ve seen such a hard swing with such a loud miss. Lucy truly deserves an A for effort; and in the world of this film, effort probably does start with the letter A. After all, in the world of this movie, 1 plus 1 does not equal 2, life did not begin 3.5 billion years ago (only 1 billion), and dolphins use twice as much of their brains as humans. Oh, and cerebral metastasis (otherwise known as cancer) gets you high and gives you superpowers. Now, despite what you may think, I highly recommend this film. For any of you who have not seen it, I promise, you are…
  • Memory and Psychosis

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    People who experience psychosis have somewhat lower tested intelligence, with a higher proportion of psychotic individuals scoring below the mean score of 100 on IQ tests. But I think that psychosis may impact tested intelligence by lowering it in a spurious way. Essentially, psychosis interferes with cognitive processes, compromising the mental activity of psychotic individuals. This is seen most prominently in individuals who experience auditory hallucinations. Psychosis is implicated in the processes of learning and memory. This impacts cognitive ability and the ability to formulate a…
  • The Hollywood Medical Reporter – Artistic License

    Daliah Leslie
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    What is more important, for a show to be compelling or medically accurate? The answer is not simple. I certainly believe that absurd inaccuracies in medical dramas, as I discussed in last week’s post on House M.D, have helped produce a public that is tragically and dangerously misinformed. However, I know we must not lose sight of the true purpose these entertainments have. House does not purport to be a factual medical source. It is meant to entertain. Nevertheless, regardless of the shows intention, it must be held responsible for any negative effect it has. That said, the medical…
  • Diabetics in Distress

    Jennifer Gibson, PharmD
    23 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Diabetes affects millions of people in the United States and remains one of the leading causes of death. The disease is associated with a myriad of complications and comorbid conditions, but mental health issues are often overlooked. “Diabetes distress” is a relatively new term that describes the psychological manifestations of diabetes management. A recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association claims that two-thirds of patients with diabetes and mental health problems are undiagnosed and untreated. This failure to recognize psychological conditions associated with a…
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    Mind Hacks

  • A torrent of accidental poems

    vaughanbell
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:27 pm
    Neurology journal Neurocase has an interesting study of a women who started compulsively writing poetry after having brief epileptic amnesia treated with the anti-seizure drug lamotrigine. A 76-year-old woman reported having a poor memory and short periods of disorientation and was eventually diagnosed with transient epileptic amnesia – brief recurrent seizures that lead to short periods where affected people can’t lay down new memories. Several months after starting lamotrigine [a common and widely used anti-seizure drug], the patient suddenly began to write original verse.
  • Round trip ticket to the science of psychedelics

    vaughanbell
    27 Aug 2014 | 11:09 am
    The latest edition of The Psychologist is a special open-access issue on the science and social impact of hallucinogenic drugs. There’s an article by me on culture and hallucinogens that discusses the role of hallucinogenic drugs in diverse cultures and which also covers how cultural expectations shape the hallucinogenic experience – from traditional Kitanemuk society to YouTube trip videos. The other articles cover some fascinating topics. Neuroscientists Robin Carhart-Harris, Mendel Kaelen and David Nutt have a great article on the neuroscience of hallucinogens, Henry David…
  • Disco biscuits

    vaughanbell
    25 Aug 2014 | 8:57 am
    This is a video of Professor Stephen Stahl, author of Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology, doing a DSM-5 themed version of Stayin’ Alive by the BeeGees.   After working out that, no, no-one has dropped acid in your morning Red Bull, you may notice that the professor busts some pretty respectable moves.   Link to video on YouTube (via @AllenFrancesMD)
  • How to speak the language of thought

    tomstafford
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:09 pm
    We are now beginning to crack the brain’s code, which allows us to answer such bizarre questions as “what is the speed of thought?” When he was asked, as a joke, to explain how the mind works in five words, cognitive scientist Steven Pinker didn’t hesitate. “Brain cells fire in patterns”, he replied. It’s a good effort, but all it really does is replace one enigma with another mystery. It’s long been known that brain cells communicate by firing electrical signals to each other, and we now have myriad technologies for recording their patterns of activity –…
  • Brain scanning the deceased

    vaughanbell
    17 Aug 2014 | 1:21 am
    I’ve got an article in The Observer about how, a little surprisingly, the dead are becoming an increasing focus for brain scanning studies. I first discussed this curious corner of neuroscience back in 2007 but a recent Neuroskeptic post reminded me of the area and I decided to check in on how it’s progressing. It turns out that brain scanning the dead is becoming increasingly common in research and medicine and the article looks at how the science is progressing. Crucially, it’s helping us better understand ourselves in both life and death. For thousands of years, direct…
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    Neuroanthropology

  • Anth 207: new open education space – update!

    gregdowney
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    If you follow Neuroanthropology, either here or on Facebook, you may have noticed something new. We’ve had a bit of a facelift to this site and added a page: Anth 207 Neuroanth 101. This new venture is an effort to generate open educational resources for people interested in psychological anthropology: students, teachers, researchers, the curious… The first video for Anth 207  Neuroanth 101 is already posted: WEIRD psychology. We’ll be adding more videos slowly, as well as suggested readings, other related resources, reflection questions, and notes. The goal is to start…
  • Almost Here! The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology

    dlende
    20 Aug 2012 | 5:22 am
    It started on this blog. In 2007, Greg and I co-founded Neuroanthropology. Five years later our book is out! “The Encultured Brain” will be published by MIT Press this Friday, August 24th, 2012. You can already order itat Amazon! The brain and the nervous system are our most cultural organs. Our nervous system is especially immature at birth, our brain disproportionately small in relation to its adult size and open to cultural sculpting at multiple levels. Recognizing this, the new field of neuroanthropology places the brain at the center of discussions about human nature and…
  • Neuroanthropology Now on Facebook

    dlende
    4 Aug 2012 | 7:54 am
    Neuroanthropology now comes in two forms on Facebook! The Blog – With Extra Content If you want to follow everything that we’re doing on the Neuroanthropology PLOS blog, and you also want short, fun posts that Greg and I have specifically written for Facebook, then head over to the Neuroanthropology Blog Facebook Page. I just stuck the great photo featured here up on Facebook – just a sample! Neuroanthropology Interest Group An active interest group – with lots of shared links and discussion – is growing quickly on Facebook. Here you can share and discover news…
  • Neuroanthropology on PLoS – Best of 2011

    dlende
    17 Jan 2012 | 1:47 pm
    The last year was a great one for us over at Neuroanthropology’s new home on the Public Library of Science – our first full year as part of PLoS Blogs, a lot of great writing, and a vivid sense that anthropology online is developing into a robust arena. Here is a quick run-down of the most read 2011 posts by Greg and by Daniel, as well as a selection of other notable posts. Greg – Top Five ‘The last free people on the planet’ *Greg’s comprehensive take on media hype over “uncontacted” Indian tribes, and how these groups truly challenge those of us living in…
  • Neuroanthropology.net at 1,000,000

    dlende
    20 Dec 2010 | 6:29 pm
    Neuroanthropology.net just broke through the 1,000,000 visits mark! We’ve done that in three years. Our very post came in December 2007. Even though Greg and I have moved over to Neuroanthropology PLoS, this site has continued to generate impressive traffic since September 1st. Here are some of the posts that got us over the top: We agree it’s WEIRD, but is it WEIRD enough? -Greg dissects the excellent study by Henrich et al. that took psychologists to task for basing claims about universal psychology using samples of college students Inside the Mind of a Pedophile -Absolutely incredible…
 
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • On the Feasibility of Head Transplants

    Adam Kolber
    2 Sep 2014 | 8:04 am
    Some interesting speculation about the feasibility of head transplants here (ht: Brian Leiter).
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:30 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Is There Such a Thing as a 'Good Psychopath'? NPR: The Protojournalist In The Popular Press: Using Light Technique, Scientists Find Dimmer Switch for Memories in Mice, NY Times Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good...
  • "Will There Ever Be a Drug with No or Negligible Side Effects? Evidence from Neuroscience"

    NELB Staffer #2
    28 Aug 2014 | 3:37 am
    Recently published in Neuroethics: "Will There Ever Be a Drug with No or Negligible Side Effects? Evidence from Neuroscience," by Sylvia Terbeck and Laurence Paul Chesterman Abstract Arguments in the neuroenhancement debate are sometimes based upon idealistic scenarios involving the...
  • "Public Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement"

    NELB Staffer #2
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    Recently published in Neuroethics: "Public Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement," by Nicholas S. F itz, Roland Nadler, Praveena Manogaran, Eugene W. J. Chong, and Peter B. Reiner. Abstract Vigorous debate over the moral propriety of cognitive enhancement exists, but the views...
  • "The Science of Morality and its Normative Implications"

    NELB Staffer #2
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:22 am
    This recently published in Neuroethics: "The Science of Morality and its Normative Implications" by Tommaso Bruni, Matteo Mameli, and Regina A. Rini. Abstract: Neuromoral theorists are those who claim that a scientific understanding of moral judgment through the methods of...
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    Neuromarketing

  • Behavioral Ads, Authorship Autopsy, Thought Leadership… Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:10 am
    Here’s your required reading for the week! Don’t forget to share your own “must read” find in a comment! One of the most powerful and quickly evolving tools available to marketers is behavioral advertising. If you aren’t using it, you [...]
  • 10 New Episodes of the Brainfluence Podcast

    Roger Dooley
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:09 am
    Time really does fly – it seems like we just published our list of the first ten episodes of The Brainfluence Podcast, and here we are with another ten! And if you aren’t getting our weekly episodes delivered to your [...]
  • The 1-2 Landing Page Punch that Will Boost Conversions

    Jeremy Smith
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:44 am
    [Guest post by Jeremy Smith] Many marketers get so caught up in the technique of marketing that they neglect the human element behind it. Ecommerce, despite its digital facade, is an intensely human platform because it’s driven by people buying [...]
  • Color Psychology, Mind-Controlling Bugs, Blog Boosters, More… Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:38 am
    You want an eclectic reading list? This week we’ve got color psychology, mind-controlling bugs, big conversion tips, neuro-politics, business blog boosters, and more! Does blue automatically make your website more trustworthy? Do red buttons get the most clicks? Colors DO [...]
  • Cooties, Conversion, Brain Reboots, and Habits – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    15 Aug 2014 | 7:51 am
    Here are the most intriguing and useful articles I’ve found in the last week, plus a summary of my own new content. Enjoy! We know from Daniel Kahneman’s work that our brains will take mental shortcuts whenever possible, including when [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • Update: Why brain training needs to be better targeted, and more widely available

    SharpBrains
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:33 am
    Time for Sharp­Brains’ August 2014 e-newsletter, fea­tur­ing a wealth of insights, sci­ence and technology reports…and this brain teaser to exercise your mental rotation abilities. Enjoy! New trends: How to incorporate mindfulness into psychotherapy Challenging the outdated “fixed brain” dogma, the cognitive training market keeps growing Increased awareness and use of cognitive assessments seen as dementia-related priorities by RAND policy brief Playing table tennis to enhance mental health Beauty in and out: Brain training workshop @ Estée Lauder New research: Use of…
  • Beauty in and out: Brain training workshop @ Estée Lauder

    SharpBrains
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:47 am
    Our very own Alvaro Fernandez will be running a brain training workshop today with a team of Estée Lauder marketing pioneers in NYC. Thanks to the CMO Club, MediaMath, and Renegade for making this possible! Workshop: Train Your Brain to Become More Innovative and Resilient (2 hours) Description: How can we train our core brain-based capacities to innovate and to thrive in today’s workplace? What can we do to invest in our most precious human resource –our amazing brain– and boost individual and collective resilience? Discover the practical applications of emerging research on brain…
  • Trend: Playing table tennis to enhance brain fitness and mental health

    SharpBrains
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:28 am
    Businessman turned love of pingpong into charity (Virginia Beach Beacon): “The elder Lees, now 76, still plays and heads up a table tennis club on the Eastern Shore…Ken Lees said it was local neurologist Dr. Scott Sautter who helped him realize the therapeutic benefits of pingpong on brain fitness and mental health… “It’s like aerobic chess,” he said. In addition to helping eye-hand coordination, and the use of reflexes, balance, planning and strategy, Lees pointed out the game’s a stress reliever, too. Lees founded the nonprofit Table Tennis Charity Foundation in 2012 to create…
  • Meet these 25+ Summit Speakers at the forefront of Brain, Health and Innovation

    SharpBrains
    26 Aug 2014 | 9:29 am
    We are proud to share the world-class and expanding roster of experts and innovators who will speak at the upcoming 2014 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (October 28-30th, 2014). Please check out their spectacular bios, the preliminary agenda, and consider joining us! As of today, we are counting on: Dr. Adam Gaz­za­ley, Direc­tor of the Neu­ro­science Imag­ing Cen­ter at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, San Francisco Aki Niko­laidis, NSF Fel­low at the Uni­ver­sity of Illi­nois Cham­paign Urbana Alex Doman, Co-founder of Sleep Genius Alvaro Fer­nan­dez, CEO of SharpBrains…
  • Increased awareness and use of cognitive assessments seen as dementia-related priorities by RAND policy brief

    SharpBrains
    25 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    Improving Dementia Long-Term Care: A Policy Blueprint (RAND Corporation’s report): “In 2010, 15 percent of Americans older than age 70 had dementia, and the number of new dementia cases among those 65 and older is expected to double by the year 2050. As the baby boomer generation ages, many older adults will require dementia-related long-term services and supports (LTSS)… RAND identified 25 high-impact policy options covering five broad objectives to improve dementia long-term services and supports (LTSS) delivery system, workforce, and financing… Objective 1: Increase public…
 
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • Exercise Promotes Brain Plasticity (BSP 111)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:00 am
    John Ratey, MDClick picture to hear interview According to psychiatrist Dr. John Ratey the best way to improve brain plasticity is by exercise.  I spoke to him shortly after he published his best-seller Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (2008). He commented that even compared to drugs "Exercise is the champ."Download BSP 111 Since then Dr. Ratey has been traveling the world promoting the value of exercise for people of all ages, but his main focus has been on young people and on trying to restore and invigorate physical education programs in the schools. In…
  • "Neurobiology for Dummies" (BSP 110)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    26 Jul 2014 | 11:09 am
    Frank Amthor, PhD: Click image to play BSP 110 Frank Amthor's latest book Neurobiology for Dummies isn't just for readers who are new to neuroscience. In this excellent follow-up to his Neuroscience for Dummies Dr. Amthor discusses a wide variety of brain-related topics. Since I have known Frank for several years it was a special treat to interview him for BSP 110. We talked about a wide variety of ideas ranging from what makes neurons special to how brains differ from current computers.  How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy…
  • John Ratey Returns

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    24 Jun 2014 | 1:00 am
    Richard Manning and John Ratey (click on photo to hear Dr. Ratey's interview) Back in 2008 I interviewed Dr. John Ratey twice: first about his then new book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (BSP 33) and then later about his work with ADHD (BSP 45). Dr. Ratey was one of my favorite guests so I was eager to interview him about his new book Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind. This latest book explores the science behind the current movement to embrace a more healthy lifestyle based on lessons learned from our hunter gatherer ancestors. Since the topic…
  • Avoiding "Neuromania" (BSP 109)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    28 May 2014 | 9:55 am
    I have spent the last 7 1/2 years sharing and promoting neuroscience and while it has been encouraging to see the field grow in popularity, there has also been a disturbing trend toward increased hype. One goal of the Brain Science Podcast is to provide accurate information that helps the average listener enjoy the science and avoid pseudoscience. BSP 109 was inspired by several excellent books that have documented the hazards of what some writers are calling "neuromania" or neurocentrism, which is the tendency to see the brain as the only path to understanding. How to get this episode:FREE:…
  • Consciousness as Social Perception (BSP 108)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    15 Apr 2014 | 1:00 am
    Michal Graziano and Kevin (click image to play interview) In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is testable and it does fit our current knowledge of brain function.In a recent interview for the Brain Science Podcast (BSP 108), Graziano used the…
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    Neuronarrative

  • The Happiness Equation

    David DiSalvo
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:01 pm
    I can’t pretend to understand how the researchers developed the equation, but one word in their lengthy explanation resonates with my math-addled brain: expectations. After all the complex analyses, it really all comes down to what we expect and how strongly we expect it.read more
  • Why Is Being Alone With Our Thoughts So Hard?

    David DiSalvo
    9 Aug 2014 | 10:55 am
    Have we become so enraptured with gadgets, social media and the dull roar of crowds that we can’t stomach facing ourselves? read more
  • Why Profile Photos Are Liars

    David DiSalvo
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Psychology researchers want us to know something about our profile photo-centrism – it’s a lie, and it’s leading us to draw conclusions that likely have zero basis in reality.read more
  • Can Money Really Buy Happiness? Well, Maybe

    David DiSalvo
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:04 pm
    "Everyone has been told if you spend your money on life experiences, it will make you happier, but we found that isn't always the case," said Ryan Howell, an associate professor of psychology at SF State and co-author of the study. But "extremely material buyers, who represent about a third of the overall population, are sort of stuck." They aren't happy either way.read more
  • How Your Blood Sugar Could Be Wrecking Your Marriage

    David DiSalvo
    8 May 2014 | 5:19 pm
    We’ve all known people who should have to wear a flashing red DANGER! sign if they miss lunch, though even without the warning we instinctively know to steer clear if someone is running on empty. A grumbling stomach means dropping blood sugar, and most of us know that means trouble -- but could the glucose crash be crashing our relationships far more than we realize?read more
 
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    "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich

  • New Eye Test Can Detect Early Alzheimer’s

    Dr. Merzenich
    6 Aug 2014 | 11:35 am
    I wrote recently about some things that can increase or decrease amyloid beta protein in the body, and how the protein plays a role in Alzheimer’s disease. Now, scientists are working on an eye test that scans for amyloid beta deposits in the retina as a way to detect early Alzheimer’s. The research is still […]The post New Eye Test Can Detect Early Alzheimer’s appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich.
  • Why Does Brain Speed Matter, and What Can I Do to Improve It?

    Dr. Merzenich
    12 Mar 2014 | 4:40 pm
    I just saw an article in Scientific American about why brain speed is important, how it decays as we age, and what the effects are on daily life over time. But this is nothing new: we have been talking about brain speed for years! Some highlights from the article include: “Studies suggest that the speed […]The post Why Does Brain Speed Matter, and What Can I Do to Improve It? appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich.
  • Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell …

    Dr. Merzenich
    3 Feb 2014 | 3:23 pm
    We are big fans of Ginger Campbell, MD’s Brain Science Podcast series – she features fascinating neuroscience luminaries in her in-depth, hour-long interviews, including Norman Doidge, Jeff Hawkins, Sharon Begley, Edward Taub, and many more. Learn more and listen now >>> Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell About Brain Plasticity Posit Science […]The post Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell … appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich.
  • Landmark Study Shows Benefits of BrainHQ Training Last 10 Years

    Dr. Merzenich
    14 Jan 2014 | 3:27 pm
    I am incredibly excited to announce that the scientists who ran the ACTIVE trial have reported that certain types of brain training—including one of the exercises in BrainHQ from Posit Science—can drive cognitive benefits that last 10 years. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, is the first to show such […]The post Landmark Study Shows Benefits of BrainHQ Training Last 10 Years appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich.
  • Soft-Wired: How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change your Life

    Dr. Merzenich
    8 Aug 2013 | 4:29 pm
    I’m excited to announce that my brand new book Soft-Wired is now out and available in paperback or Kindle format. This book was a labor of love, and it took me many years and many iterations to say exactly what I wanted, how I wanted to say it. The result is a book that covers […]The post Soft-Wired: How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change your Life appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Merzenich.
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Witch Hunter Sues BHA

    Steven Novella
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:14 am
    The British Humanist Association has announced that they are being sued by notorious Nigerian “witch hunter”, Helen Ukpabio, for half a billion pounds for alleged libel. The only reasonable response to this situation, in my opinion, is to magnify the criticism of Ukpabio as much as possible. For those who are not aware, I am also being sued for expressing my critical opinions. You can read the full details here. I have always supported my fellow skeptics in the past when they faced being silenced through legal intimidation, but now I have to disclose that I have a personal…
  • Bt and Leukemia – Another Anti-GMO Myth

    Steven Novella
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:13 am
    The headline of an article on the Organic Consumers Association proclaims, “New Study Links GMO Food To Leukemia.” The same article trumpets the thoroughly discredited Seralini study. The claim is not true, but is part of a pattern of behavior that is depressingly familiar. The pattern is not unique to anti-GMO activism. In fact, it seems to be the default human behavior. We tend to search for information that supports our currently held views. The more passionate we are about those views, the more industrious we are in finding apparent support, even if it means twisting and…
  • Scientific Literacy

    Steven Novella
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:29 am
    I was recently interviewed for an article on Medical News Today by David McNamee regarding Why is scientific literacy among the general population important? The topic, of course, is very important to me, as I have spent a great deal of my time attempting to promote scientific literacy generally, with an emphasis on medical science since that is my specialty. Carl Sagan articulated the basic issue well (of course) – to paraphrase, we live in a civilization increasingly dominated by science and technology, and with a populace less and less able to understand current science and…
  • Nassim Taleb, The Precautionary Principle, and GMOs

    Steven Novella
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:24 am
    Nassim Taleb is a serious scholar of risk assessment, especially in the world of economics. So when he and two co-authors published a paper on the precautionary principle as it applies to genetically modified organisms it is worth taking seriously. That does not mean I have to agree with his conclusions, however. What I found was that Taleb’s argument is mathematically rigorous, although I think too absolute, but also is biologically naive. Here is his argument in a nutshell: The mathematical part if this – if we consider risk prevention, we must decide how much risk is…
  • What’s The Harm – Ebola Edition

    Steven Novella
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:21 am
    A common defense of implausible treatments is the question – “what’s the harm.” In other words, implausible therapies might help and can’t hurt, so there is no harm in trying. Is this a valid argument, however? In trying to assess which side of a controversy has the better position I look toward logic and evidence. Evidence is critical, of course, but in fields outside my expertise I have to rely upon experts to interpret that evidence and put it into a broad and deep scientific context. In controversies, often the data itself is not the core issue, but which…
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • Mind Uploading, Brain Simulation, Blue Brain Project, Transhumanism

    S. C. Flynn
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:22 pm
    A piece on mind uploading, brain simulation, Blue Brain Project, Thomas Nagel, transhumanism, IBM, philosophy of mind, strong AI: http://scflynn.com/mind-uploading/
  • Get YOUR handwriting analyzed FREE by me (see details!!!)...

    Treyce Montoya's Blog
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:21 pm
    Get YOUR handwriting analyzed FREE by me personally – ONE DAY ONLY – no exceptions. LABO
  • A Spiritual Practice: Vocal Acupuncture

    Bil & Cher Holton - The Metaphysical Website
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:19 pm
    The words we use not only penetrate deeply into our psyches but they become embedded in our cellular architecture as well. Our entire bodily constitution is affected by the thoughts we have and the words we use. Our thoughts and words – whether they are positively framed or negatively charged – are self-fulfilling triggers! Vocal acupuncture, as a spiritual practice, invites you to use positive affirmations, affirmative prayer, mantras, optimistic phrases, and positive self-talk as often as you can. It means building these positivity statements into your spoken words and vocabulary. The…
  • Artificial Intelligence: Can Science Truly Recreate You? [Daily Nexus//Science & Tech, 8.28.2014]

    surajsood
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:10 pm
    With the unprecedented rise of millennial computing, lightning fast telecommunication, vibrant social media and virtually limitless access to information, our lives are consumed by a torrent of powerful technological influences. The gap between who we are at a deeper, more philosophical level and who we appear to be on our various web profiles is simultaneously widened and blurred by recent scientific and technological advancements. “Who we are” has become a vexing and tiresomely complex concept, and in our push toward increasingly more efficient modes of survival, we seem to have run out…
  • The Learning Brain Unravelled

    Gabriel
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    As an engineer you would think math would come easy to me, it didn’t. Funny thing though, scie
 
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to TARP Regulation of Channel Conductance and Polyamine Block of Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors

    Soto, D., Coombs, I. D., Gratacos-Batlle, E., Farrant, M., Cull-Candy, S. G.
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    Many properties of fast synaptic transmission in the brain are influenced by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) that modulate the pharmacology and gating of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although much is known about TARP influence on AMPAR pharmacology and kinetics through their modulation of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (LBD), less is known about their regulation of the ion channel region. TARP-induced modifications in AMPAR channel behavior include increased single-channel conductance and weakened block of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) by endogenous…
  • Fine-Scale Plasticity of Microscopic Saccades

    Havermann, K., Cherici, C., Rucci, M., Lappe, M.
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    When asked to maintain their gaze steady on a given location, humans continually perform microscopic eye movements, including fast gaze shifts known as microsaccades. It has long been speculated that these movements may contribute to the maintenance of fixation, but evidence has remained contradictory. We used a miniaturized version of saccadic adaptation, an experimental procedure by which motor control of saccades is modified through intrasaccadic displacements of the target. We found that the statistical distribution of microsaccade amplitudes changes after brief exposure to systematic…
  • Beta Oscillation Dynamics in Extrastriate Cortex after Removal of Primary Visual Cortex

    Schmiedt, J. T., Maier, A., Fries, P., Saunders, R. C., Leopold, D. A., Schmid, M. C.
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    The local field potential (LFP) in visual cortex is typically characterized by the following spectral pattern: before the onset of a visual stimulus, low-frequency oscillations (beta, 12–20 Hz) dominate, whereas during the presentation of a stimulus these oscillations diminish and are replaced by fluctuations at higher frequencies (gamma, >30 Hz). The origin of beta oscillations in vivo remains unclear, as is the basis of their suppression during visual stimulation. Here we investigate the contribution of ascending input from primary visual cortex (V1) to beta oscillation dynamics in…
  • MHC Class I Limits Hippocampal Synapse Density by Inhibiting Neuronal Insulin Receptor Signaling

    Dixon-Salazar, T. J., Fourgeaud, L., Tyler, C. M., Poole, J. R., Park, J. J., Boulanger, L. M.
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    Proteins of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) negatively regulate synapse density in the developing vertebrate brain (Glynn et al., 2011; Elmer et al., 2013; Lee et al., 2014), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identify a novel MHCI signaling pathway that involves the inhibition of a known synapse-promoting factor, the insulin receptor. Dominant-negative insulin receptor constructs decrease synapse density in the developing Xenopus visual system (Chiu et al., 2008), and insulin receptor activation increases dendritic spine density in mouse…
  • Differential Regulation of Cone Calcium Signals by Different Horizontal Cell Feedback Mechanisms in the Mouse Retina

    Kemmler, R., Schultz, K., Dedek, K., Euler, T., Schubert, T.
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    Controlling neurotransmitter release by modulating the presynaptic calcium level is a key mechanism to ensure reliable signal transmission from one neuron to the next. In this study, we investigated how the glutamatergic output of cone photoreceptors (cones) in the mouse retina is shaped by different feedback mechanisms from postsynaptic GABAergic horizontal cells (HCs) using a combination of two-photon calcium imaging and pharmacology at the level of individual cone axon terminals. We provide evidence that hemichannel-mediated (putative ephaptic) feedback sets the cone output gain by…
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    Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

  • Maybe Your Kids Inherited Your Couch Potato Genes

    26 Aug 2014 | 8:26 am
    On the road to sports success, young athletes need two ingredients, innate skills and the willingness and determination to get better.  We all know boys and girls who showed early promise that got them noticed but then didn’t have the drive to practice every day to develop that talent.  Often labeled lazy or unmotivated, the assumption was that they chose their own path by not working hard.  However, new research shows evidence that genetics may play a role not only in the natural abilities of a developing superstar but also in their practice persistence and…
  • See The Game Through The Eyes Of The Quarterback

    6 Aug 2014 | 1:57 pm
    Going into the start of football season, there is plenty of expert commentary on what makes up the “right stuff” when evaluating quarterbacks. Everything from arm strength to height to foot skills to the size of their hands was measured and dissected to find the magic combination of variables. While the body mechanics of delivering a football on target are vital, QBs rely even more on their vision both before and after the ball is snapped.It’s not just knowing where and when to look at an opposing defense but also understanding what to look for across the line. Defensive players are…
  • How To Train The Runner's Brain - An Interview With Jason Fitzgerald

    5 Jun 2014 | 10:49 am
    As productive human athletes, we just assume that we can knock down any walls put in front of us and conquer new feats of greatness if "we just put our mind to it."  Our conscious brain sets goals, gives pep talks and convinces us that with the right training plan, we can finish a race of any distance. But, when we're stretching our training run farther than ever before, the little voice in our head pops up to try to talk some sense into us; "that's enough for today" or "there's a lot of pain happening right now, time to quit."  As I discussed in last week's post about the…
  • Fight Fatigue By Overriding Your Brain's Urge To Quit

    29 May 2014 | 1:44 pm
    What makes an endurance athlete quit? Not quit the sport, but quit during a competition.  Every runner, swimmer, or cyclist starts a race with the desire to win or at least achieve a personal best time.  They’ve done the pre-race math - keep at a certain pace for the entire distance to achieve the target time.  Their wearable technology keeps them updated on heart rate, distance and split times to stay on that pace.  However, at the finish line, many athletes are not able to maintain their strides/strokes per minute, giving in to the perception that their energy tank is…
  • Marathons Are Tough On The Heart, But Training Helps

    20 Apr 2014 | 2:20 pm
    Now that it’s mid-April, thousands of amateur runners are realizing the time has come to get serious about their Spring marathon training plans.  The easier 4-6 mile weekday jogs increase quickly into 10-15 mile weekend long runs.  For those new to endurance distances, this jump in mileage can put a strain not only on the legs but also on the heart.  In fact, there’s been some confusing research in the press lately with some claiming a marathon can do some coronary damage while others praising the health benefits of the cardiovascular training.First, the encouraging news.
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    The Brain Understanding Itself

  • The Irlen Method Explained

    Alex Doman
    19 Aug 2014 | 12:08 pm
      Earlier this summer I had the good fortune of attending the Advanced Clinical Summit with my friends and colleagues at EEG Info in Southern California.  My wife and I were there together speaking with many of the leading Neurofeedback practitioners from around the world. During the course of that weekend I noticed a familiar face in the room. That familiar face was Helen Irlen, creator of the Irlen Method. Helen’s name has come up often with our network of providers who offer The Listening Program® and inTime™ music listening therapy methods. Many of whom combine our brain…
  • Full Access to inTime Video Series

    Alex Doman
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:58 pm
    During the launch of inTime earlier this year we were very honored to have The Rockefeller University host us in their Science and Lecture Series for inTime: Intercultural Rhythms, Music, Sound and Science. The event was a panel discussion with fellow inTime producers Sheila Allen, Nacho Arimany and me, moderated by neuroscientist Dr. Kamran Fallahpour. Following the panel inTime music composer and multi-instrumentalist Nacho Arimany treated us to an incredible concert of his original world-music compositions. Why am I sharing this with you now? Well, our friends at Ferro Productions and…
  • Forgive me

    Alex Doman
    15 May 2014 | 3:25 pm
      Forgive me, I can’t contain my excitement! After months of hard work by an amazing group of people today we launched the entirely new Sleep Genius app for iOS. And then the most amazing thing happened… It has been featured as a Best New App in the App Store! Personally, I have to  agree with Apple on that point. Can’t sleep like 25% of your family and friends? Check out the app and tell me what you think! Android users, the new app will be in Google play anytime now. Wearables anyone? Sleep Genius seamlessly integrates with Jawbone Up and Fitbit. Note you’ll…
  • Back At It

    Alex Doman
    13 May 2014 | 11:20 am
    Did you miss me? Perhaps you didn’t notice I was gone… Either way, I wanted to share that I’m back at it! Back at what you ask? Blogging… In November I decided to take a hiatus from writing posts so I could focus with a really awesome team of people to launch two exciting products for Advanced Brain Technologies and Sleep Genius. One of these launched in February. It is a rhythm-based music listening therapy called inTime and I must say it is incredible! I couldn’t be happier about the response to it and the stories I am already hearing about the lives it is…
  • On Hiatus

    Alex Doman
    20 Nov 2013 | 10:55 am
    There are periods in life when you are presented with such abundance of opportunity that you have to make difficult choices about where to spend your time. At the moment this is the case for me. The next 3 months will require my laser sharp focus to launch a significant new program from Advanced Brain Technologies while managing other initiatives through the holidays. For now I must let some things go, including posting to my blog, so this is my official notice that I’m on blogging hiatus. I hope you enjoy the holiday season and look forward to reconnecting with you after the…
 
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    Brain Posts

  • The Social Brain: Weekend Reading Links

    29 Aug 2014 | 8:36 am
    The theme for September Brain Posts will be human attachment and social neuroscience research.Here are a series of relevant links to abstracts on this topic that I will be reviewing.All abstract links are to manuscripts that have free full-text access.These highlighted abstracts are culled from over 100 recent publications abstracts I reviewed on this topic.To access the abstract, click on the topic title and you will be sent to the PubMed link.For U.S. readers, Happy Labor Day!The photo on today's post is an overlook view of Santa Fe, NM from the Dale Ball mountain trail using the iPhone…
  • Gambler Sub-types: Three Distinct Profiles

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:40 am
    One method to advance understanding of a disorder is to use statistical modeling for sub-type or class analysis.Lia Nower and colleagues recently published the results of such an analysis from the large general population data-set known as the U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).In this sample, 851 adults 18 years and older were identified with disordered gambling.This group then underwent a type of latent class statistical analysis known as the Pathways Model.Using this Pathways Model, the research team was able to identify three groups of disordered…
  • Diagnostic Profile in Pathological Gamblers

    27 Aug 2014 | 7:58 am
    Behavioral disorders like pathological gambling (PG) rarely occur alone as a single uncomplicated disorder.In a previous post, I noted the overlap of PG with personality disorder, anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder and substance abuse.A recent study from Germany adds to our knowledge of the general diagnostic profile in the PG population.Erbas and Buchner reviewed German national data sources and other German studies to come up with a series of findings:Twelve month prevalence rates for PG are estimated to range from 0.2% to 0.6% Men make up 70% to 80% of the PG populationWomen…
  • Genetics of Pathological Gambling

    25 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    There is growing evidence that genetic factors play a key role in the risk for the development of pathological gambling.Two recent studies have demonstrated some key features of the genetics of pathological gambling.These two studies also highlight the overlap between pathological gambling and other psychiatric and substance dependence disorders.Don Black and colleagues at the University of Iowa conducted a classic family study of DSM-IV pathological gambling.In family studies, probands with a specific disorder are identified and then compared to a control group of probands without the…
  • Guidelines for Treatment of Problem Gambling

    18 Aug 2014 | 7:16 am
    Despite the prevalence and impact of problem gambling, few summaries or guidelines address treatment.Searching the guideline.gov website shows no recent additions to the guideline literature.A guideline was published by the Singapore Ministry of Health in 2011. This guideline is still relevant and highlights some of the key elements of a problem gambling treatment program.I will summarize some of these key elements from this source titled: "Management of gambling disorders".  In their summary they highlight the level of evidence and research for each element. I will focus on those with…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • U.N. Urges U.S. to Stop Police Brutality After Missouri Shooting

    Yahoo News - Health
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:14 am
    Source: Yahoo News - HealthThe United Nations racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Minorities, particularly African Americans, are victims of disparities, the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said after examining the U.S.
  • National Football League Increases Penalties for Domestic Violence

    CNN - US News
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:33 pm
    Source: CNN - US NewsIn the wake of criticism over a two-game suspension for Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, the NFL has established a six-game unpaid ban for personnel who violate the league's policy on domestic violence, Commissioner Roger Goodell said Thursday.
  • Death Certificates Would Reflect Gender Identity Under California Bill

    Reuters - US News
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:33 pm
    Source: Reuters - US NewsDeath certificates in California would be changed to reflect the gender identity of people at the time of their death rather than their sex at birth under a bill passed by lawmakers on Wednesday, the latest effort by the state to further the rights of transgender residents.
  • Residents See Europe Best for Gay and Lesbian People, Africa Worst

    Yahoo News - Health
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:32 pm
    Source: Yahoo News - HealthMost people in European nations say their community is a welcoming place for gays and lesbians, according to a poll released on Wednesday that also showed many in African countries see their homelands as hostile to homosexuals. One exception appeared to be South Africa, the only country on the continent where same-sex marriage is legal. Nearly half of those polled there said their community was hospitable to gays, although slightly more than...
  • U.S. to Consider Spousal Abuse in Asylum Requests

    Yahoo News - Top Headlines
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:40 am
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesIn a first-of-its-kind ruling that could make it easier for some immigrant women to win permission to remain legally in the United States, the Justice Department Board of Immigration Appeals has determined that Guatemalan women who fled their country due to domestic violence can qualify for asylum.
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    The Neurocritic

  • Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

    31 Aug 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in the form of beautiful equations that are the envy of the softer sciences.xkcd: PurityThe enterprise…
  • Autobiographical Memory for a Life-Threatening Airline Disaster

    24 Aug 2014 | 11:04 pm
    “My attention shifts to the fact that the comforting engine hum is eerily gone. Where has the comforting hum of the engines gone. Something has gone very, very wrong, the plane continued to shake.” -Daniel Goncalves, recalling the terror of Air Transat Flight 236I'm sitting here in an airport, reading a harrowing first person account of Air Transat Flight 236, which fell out of the sky when it lost all power on Aug. 24, 2001.The plane was bound from Toronto, Ontario to Lisbon, Portugal when a fuel leak in the right engine began 3 hrs and 46 min after takeoff (at 04:38 UTC). The leak went…
  • The Neuro Sci-Fi of the Near Future

    14 Aug 2014 | 2:56 am
    NEUROTECH LIGHT AND DARK »Tweet length visions of our DARPA-funded futureThe Neurocritic has recently blogged about The Neuroscience of the Future:Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?Here’s a sample of Neurotech Light and Dark, a sci fi collection of 16 very short stories about neuroscience and technology, by S. Kay.A brain-computer interface controls her robotic arm. As easily as not thinking, she uses it…
  • Interview with Dr. Jan Kalbitzer, author of the "Twitter Psychosis" article

    10 Aug 2014 | 3:13 am
    Today I'm chatting with Dr. Jan Kabitzer, a Physician and Leader of the Neurochemistry Research Group at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin.Dr. Kabitzer is first author of the “Twitter Psychosis” article that made international news and took social media by storm on August 6, 2014. His provocatively titled paper, “Twitter Psychosis: A Rare Variation or a Distinct Syndrome?”(Kalbitzer et al., 2014), appeared online a week earlier in The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. I was struck by the title, of course, and an abstract claiming that “Twitter may have a high potential to…
  • Twitter Psychosis as a Cultural Artifact

    31 Jul 2014 | 3:36 pm
    UPDATE (Aug 6 2014): This story has spun entirely out of control, with breathless coverage at The Daily Dot and Jezebel. Today the hapless first author told NBC News: "No, at this point Twitter psychosis is not 'real.'" And no, a woman was not committed to psychiatric hospital with ‛Twitter psychosis’! However, the general confusion created by the ensuing media circus might be what the authors were trying to get at...Study: Woman committed to psychiatric hospital with ‛Twitter psychosis’ http://t.co/dzauEfthzr— The Daily Dot (@dailydot) August 7, 2014The original post resumes…
 
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    The Beautiful Brain

  • E.O. Wilson on the Brain

    Ben Ehrlich
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:39 pm
    In this month’s issue of Harper’s magazine, legendary biologist E.O. Wilson—the ant man who also authors books about the meaning of existence—takes on consciousness and the brain. The article, “On Free Will,” carries the unsurprising subtitle: “And how the brain is like a colony of ants.” He runs down the essential anatomical, functional, genetic and evolutionary information about the brain, defining the complex organ and its unique importance. Then, he relates the efforts of philosophers to find a physical basis for consciousness, which may or may…
  • Sculptor of Her Own Brain

    Ben Ehrlich
    16 May 2014 | 7:54 am
    Rebecca Kamen believes that artists and scientists have a similar mission, and she tries to reflect these similarities in her sculptures. Inspired by the work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, “the father of modern neuroscience,” some of her sculptures are on display at the National Institutes for Health, where she has been the artist in residence in the neuroscience program. PBS NewsHour has published an article about her story, called “Portrait of a dyslexic artist, who transforms neurons into ‘butterflies.’” Ramón y Cajal famously referred to the cells in…
  • Science on Screen

    Ben Ehrlich
    27 Mar 2014 | 3:12 pm
    On March 31st, seventeen independent theaters in cities across the country will host Science on Screen, an evening pairing mainstream film and scientific presentation. Supported by the Coolidge Corner Theater and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Science on Screen will feature different programs nationwide If you live in New York City, for example, Brooklyn’s BAM is showing Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, followed by a discussion of emotion and memory with Joseph LeDoux, director of the Emotional Brain Institute at New York University. See if your local theater is…
  • Fridtjof the Great

    Ben Ehrlich
    24 Feb 2014 | 8:29 pm
    I never knew about Fridtjof Nansen. His 1887 doctoral thesis argued for the independence of the nerve cell, making him one of the earliest defenders of what would be called “the neuron doctrine.” He promptly quit neuroscience and went on an arctic expedition across Greenland. Then he went to the North Pole. He topped it all off with a Nobel Peace Prize, after serving his native Norway in the League of Nations for a decade. His lasting legacy, however, is probably the “Nansen passport” for stateless persons, still recognized by over fifty countries. “It is better…
  • Art and the Default Mode Network

    Noah Hutton
    16 Feb 2014 | 11:37 pm
    A recent symposium presented by Columbia and NYU explored what happens in our brains when we’re at rest, and why those same brain regions are crucial when we view art. “It’s not about merging disciplines,” David Freedberg told a crowd gathered at NYU’s Silver Center for Arts and Science last week, “it’s about listening.” Freedberg, an eminent art historian who serves as the director if the Italian Academy at Columbia University, was speaking about the alternately tense and productive relationship between the humanities and neurosciences. This is an intersection that he…
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    The Neurocritic

  • Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

    The Neurocritic
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in the form of beautiful equations that are the envy of the softer sciences.xkcd: PurityThe enterprise…
  • Autobiographical Memory for a Life-Threatening Airline Disaster

    The Neurocritic
    24 Aug 2014 | 11:04 pm
    “My attention shifts to the fact that the comforting engine hum is eerily gone. Where has the comforting hum of the engines gone. Something has gone very, very wrong, the plane continued to shake.” -Daniel Goncalves, recalling the terror of Air Transat Flight 236I'm sitting here in an airport, reading a harrowing first person account of Air Transat Flight 236, which fell out of the sky when it lost all power on Aug. 24, 2001.The plane was bound from Toronto, Ontario to Lisbon, Portugal when a fuel leak in the right engine began 3 hrs and 46 min after takeoff (at 04:38 UTC). The leak went…
  • The Neuro Sci-Fi of the Near Future

    The Neurocritic
    14 Aug 2014 | 2:56 am
    NEUROTECH LIGHT AND DARK »Tweet length visions of our DARPA-funded futureThe Neurocritic has recently blogged about The Neuroscience of the Future:Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?Here’s a sample of Neurotech Light and Dark, a sci fi collection of 16 very short stories about neuroscience and technology, by S. Kay.A brain-computer interface controls her robotic arm. As easily as not thinking, she uses it…
  • Interview with Dr. Jan Kalbitzer, author of the "Twitter Psychosis" article

    The Neurocritic
    10 Aug 2014 | 3:13 am
    Today I'm chatting with Dr. Jan Kabitzer, a Physician and Leader of the Neurochemistry Research Group at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin.Dr. Kabitzer is first author of the “Twitter Psychosis” article that made international news and took social media by storm on August 6, 2014. His provocatively titled paper, “Twitter Psychosis: A Rare Variation or a Distinct Syndrome?”(Kalbitzer et al., 2014), appeared online a week earlier in The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. I was struck by the title, of course, and an abstract claiming that “Twitter may have a high potential to…
  • Twitter Psychosis as a Cultural Artifact

    The Neurocritic
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:36 pm
    UPDATE (Aug 6 2014): This story has spun entirely out of control, with breathless coverage at The Daily Dot and Jezebel. Today the hapless first author told NBC News: "No, at this point Twitter psychosis is not 'real.'" And no, a woman was not committed to psychiatric hospital with ‛Twitter psychosis’! However, the general confusion created by the ensuing media circus might be what the authors were trying to get at...Study: Woman committed to psychiatric hospital with ‛Twitter psychosis’ http://t.co/dzauEfthzr— The Daily Dot (@dailydot) August 7, 2014The original post resumes…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • The myth of left-brained and right-brained personalities

    Bruno Dubuc
    18 Aug 2014 | 9:59 am
    One often reads that certain functions of the human brain are lateralized—for example, that the left hemisphere is more involved in language and the right in the processing of visuospatial information. One also often hears it said that some people are left-brained (meaning that they are analytical, logical, and focused on details) while others are right-brained (more subjective and creative, with more of a tendency to see things as a whole). But according to a study published on August 14, 2013 in the online journal PLOS ONE, although there is abundant evidence for the lateralization of…
  • Daniel Wegner: An Unforgettable Scientific Contribution

    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:48 pm
    For many people, the name of pioneering social psychologist Daniel Wegner will always be associated with a polar bear, because he famously used an image of this animal to demonstrate how hard it is to suppress a thought if someone simply asks you not to think about it. Wegner died on July 5, 2013 at the age of 65 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease characterized by degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord. Acknowledging his passing, the scientific community saluted him as one of the most original thinkers in his field. His friend and fellow psychologist Daniel…
  • Summer school in cognitive sciences 2014 : Web Science and the mind

    Bruno Dubuc
    1 Jul 2014 | 11:54 am
    Every two years, the Cognitive Sciences Institute of the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) holds a summer school on a selected topic in the cognitive sciences. In 2010, the topic was the origin of language, in 2012 it was the evolution and function of consciousness. This summer, from July 7 to 18, 2014, the school will be holding its 5th edition, and the topic will be web science and the mind. The school will be taught and attended by international specialists on the subject of distributed cognition in the brain, between brains, and between brains and computers. The speakers at this…
  • Making the Brain Transparent To Explore It More Easily

    Bruno Dubuc
    16 Jun 2014 | 1:00 pm
    A relatively new technique can now perform the amazing feat of making a mouse’s brain completely transparent (This same technique has been tried on human brains as well, but so far has succeeded in making only parts of them transparent.) But enabling scientists to see through the brain would be merely an interesting curiosity if this technique—dubbed “Clarity” by the team that developed it—did not also preserve the brain’s entire underlying cellular and molecular structure, so that existing methods of staining and tracing nerve bundles can be applied to the brain once it has been…
  • The Variety and Structural Complexity of Neurons

    Bruno Dubuc
    27 May 2014 | 6:53 am
    The purpose of most of the posts in this blog is to summarize recent studies in the cognitive sciences and attempt to make them more accessible—in particular by providing links to selected pages on this website. But the purpose of some of the other posts is simply to draw attention to existing resources on various aspects of neuroscience. Today’s post falls in the latter category. It deals with the neuron and the work by Kristen Harris and her colleagues to reveal it in all its complexity (see the first two links below). Neurons are like any other cells in the human body, except that they…
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    Your Brain Health

  • Why working too hard impairs your thinking.

    Sarah McKay
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:36 am
    This week’s blog post comes from Rebekah Lambert. Rebekah makes her living as marketing, content creation and copywriting freelancer at Unashamedly Creative and as head of Disruption for Discordia Zine. Rebekah has just begun a mission to improve the mental health and wellness outcomes for freelancers and entrepreneurs as one half of the Hacking Happiness team. You can follow her journey […]The post Why working too hard impairs your thinking. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Neuroplasticity: the battle in your brain

    Sarah McKay
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Today’s blog comes from my courageous friend and fellow brain blogger, Debbie Hampton, who writes over at The Best Brain Possible. In her words her blog provides: information and inspiration for anyone with a brain and desiring to improve it. The Battle in Your Brain When Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel, he had to work […]The post Neuroplasticity: the battle in your brain appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Are music lessons the key to smarter kids?

    Sarah McKay
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:30 pm
    My 4 year-old son Jamie started piano lessons last year. This might seem a little young, but the classes are designed to make learning music fun. Jamie’s teachers use an unique multi-sensory approach that engages the different senses: auditory, visual and kinaesthetic (movement). The kids learn the notes as: do, re, mi, fa, so, etc, and each note has […]The post Are music lessons the key to smarter kids? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic]

    Sarah McKay
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:36 pm
    › With BIG thanks to EyeWire and Visually.  The post Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience

    Sarah McKay
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Neuroscience seems to offer daily insights into the very core of what it means to be human. But caution is advised. I’m the first to admit its easy to fall into the trap of ‘pop’ neuroscience, neuro-hype, neuro-mania, or ‘mindless neuroscience’. Writing and communicating the complexities and nuances of neuroscience and the brain is hard. There […]The post July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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