Neuroscience

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  • Fifteen MIT scientists receive NIH BRAIN Initiative grants

    MIT News - Neuroscience
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences | Picower Institute for Learning and Memory | McGovern Institute for Brain Research
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:12 pm
    Today, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced their first round of BRAIN Initiative award recipients. Six teams and 15 researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were recipients. Mriganka Sur, principal investigator at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Paul E. Newton Professor of Neuroscience in MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) leads a team studying cortical circuits and information flow during memory-guided perceptual decisions. Co-principal investigators include Emery Brown, BCS professor of computational neuroscience and…
  • 4 Facts About Decision Making That Will Improve Conversion Rate Optimization

    Neuromarketing
    Jeremy Smith
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    Everything in conversion optimization comes down to the customer making a decision... Yes or no. That’s the clutch point in conversion optimization. Leading up to this decision is the process of decision making.
  • Researchers Show EEG’s Potential to Reveal Depolarizations Following TBI

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:27 pm
    Researchers show spreading depolarization can be measured noninvasively in TBI patients using EEG technology.
  • New understanding of emotional impact of stroke

    Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today
    1 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    The physical challenges associated with recovery from a stroke are well documented however the impact of a stroke on emotion is less well understood.
  • New learning mechanism for individual nerve cells

    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:05 am
    Learning is based on the strengthening or weakening of the contacts between the nerve cells in the brain -- this has been the traditional understanding. However, this has been challenged by new research findings. These indicate that there is also a third mechanism – a kind of clock function that gives individual nerve cells the ability to time their reactions.
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • New learning mechanism for individual nerve cells

    30 Sep 2014 | 6:05 am
    Learning is based on the strengthening or weakening of the contacts between the nerve cells in the brain -- this has been the traditional understanding. However, this has been challenged by new research findings. These indicate that there is also a third mechanism – a kind of clock function that gives individual nerve cells the ability to time their reactions.
  • Selectively rewiring brain's circuitry to treat depression

    30 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    On Star Trek, it is easy to take for granted the incredible ability of futuristic doctors to wave small devices over the heads of both humans and aliens, diagnose their problems through evaluating changes in brain activity or chemistry, and then treat behavior problems by selectively stimulating relevant brain circuits. While that day is a long way off, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex does treat symptoms of depression in humans by placing a relatively small device on a person’s scalp and stimulating brain circuits.
  • 'Frenemy' in Parkinson's disease takes to crowdsourcing

    29 Sep 2014 | 2:44 pm
    A key neuronal protein called alpha-synuclein normally gathers in synapses, where aggregates of it help regulate neurotransmissions, researchers have found. In overabundance, though, a-synuclein can choke off communication altogether, leading to neuronal death and related diseases.
  • Single-neuron 'hub' orchestrates activity of an entire brain circuit

    29 Sep 2014 | 12:47 pm
    New research makes a major contribution to efforts to navigate the brain, offering a precise model of the organization of developing neuronal circuits. If researchers can further identify the cellular type of 'hub neurons,' it may be possible to reproduce them in vitro and transplant them into aged or damaged brain circuitries in order to recover functionality.
  • Sleep twitches light up the brain

    29 Sep 2014 | 12:39 pm
    A new study finds twitches during rapid eye movement sleep comprise a different class of movement, which researchers say is further evidence that sleep twitches activate circuits throughout the developing brain and teach newborns about their limbs and what they can do with them.
 
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    MIT News - Neuroscience

  • Fifteen MIT scientists receive NIH BRAIN Initiative grants

    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences | Picower Institute for Learning and Memory | McGovern Institute for Brain Research
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:12 pm
    Today, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced their first round of BRAIN Initiative award recipients. Six teams and 15 researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were recipients. Mriganka Sur, principal investigator at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Paul E. Newton Professor of Neuroscience in MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) leads a team studying cortical circuits and information flow during memory-guided perceptual decisions. Co-principal investigators include Emery Brown, BCS professor of computational neuroscience and…
  • Picower and MIT scientists awarded BRAIN Initiative grants

    Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:24 am
    Today, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the first round of Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative award recipients, including several MIT interdisciplinary teams. The BRAIN Initiative, spearheaded by President Obama in April 2013, challenges the nation’s leading scientists to advance our sophisticated understanding of the human mind and discover new ways to treat, prevent, and cure neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism, and traumatic brain injury. “The human brain is one of the most complicated…
  • Modeling shockwaves through the brain

    Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Since the start of the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 300,000 soldiers have returned to the United States with traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by exposure to bomb blasts — and in particular, exposure to improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. Symptoms of traumatic brain injury can range from the mild, such as lingering headaches and nausea, to more severe impairments in memory and cognition. Since 2007, the U.S. Department of Defense has recognized the critical importance and complexity of this problem, and has made significant investments in traumatic brain injury…
  • Using science for service

    Julia Sklar | MIT News correspondent
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    MIT senior Sofia Essayan-Perez, majoring in brain and cognitive sciences with a minor in applied international studies, has founded an educational nonprofit, conducted neuroscience research, and tutored MIT students. The common thread that binds these disparate interests: They all stem from hardships that those around her have faced.  Essayan-Perez was born in Boston, but spent her formative years moving among Chile, Nicaragua, the United States, and Canada, as her parents, both researchers in the social sciences, took on international projects. This diversity of experiences and…
  • Picower study finds connection between rare muscle disease and autoimmune disorders

    Deborah Halber | Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    4 Sep 2014 | 11:05 am
    Patients with a rare neuromuscular disorder and those with nerve damage tied to autoimmune disorders may share the same faulty synapses, neuroscientists at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory report in the September issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. The work supports the notion that some muscle problems originate in nerve cells, not in the muscle itself. The study identifies for the first time a presynaptic cause for a class of incurable neuromuscular diseases — known as congenital myasthenic syndromes — in which muscles weaken or waste away. The syndromes are…
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    ScienceBlogs

  • A Poor Description of the Monty Hall Problem [EvolutionBlog]

    jrosenhouse
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:09 pm
    My latest book project has been coediting the proceedings of the 2013 MOVES Conference held in New York City, which has turned out to be a lot harder than I anticipated. For the last few weeks it’s been all-consuming, and spending so many hours in front of the computer staring at other people’s writing has left me with little enthusiasm for producing any of my own. Happily, the book is now finished (well, modulo the inevitable copy editing and production chaos at any rate), so it’s time to do some blogging again. And what better way to get back into the swing of things than…
  • I hope Judith Curry apologizes for this. [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:22 pm
    I’m not going to talk about Mark Steyn, other than to say that if you know who Rush Limbaugh is, Mark Steyn is a bit to the right and a tad more obnoxious, but not as smart. You can find out more by clicking here, using the Climate Change Science Search Engine. I’m also not going to say much about Judith Curry except that, unlike Steyn, she was a regular scientist who did climate science. Over time the material she has written, both in peer reviewed journals and on her blog, has become increasingly aligned with those who are highly skeptical that global warming is real. She has a…
  • Ebola diagnosed in Texas: don’t panic [Aetiology]

    Tara C. Smith
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:00 pm
    My first article at The Guardian is up: No, Ebola in Dallas does not mean you and everyone else in the US is going to get it, too.
  • CMB Part 1: The “Smoking Gun” of the Big Bang (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:33 pm
    When you think about it, it wasn’t all that long ago — just 50 years — that we didn’t know where our Universe came from. A hot, dense early state? A cyclical, swirling past? Or perhaps a time-independent one, where the Universe back then was not so different from our own today? All that changed in 1964, quite by accident. “Horn Antenna-in Holmdel, New Jersey” by NASA — Great Images in NASA Description. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. With the first detection of the Cosmic Microwave Background, and its identification as the leftover glow…
  • Compliments to the chef: Partnerships between school food staff, professional chefs lead to healthier eating [The Pump Handle]

    Kim Krisberg
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:49 pm
    Building excitement around school meals with the help of guest chefs and fresh recipes could be a significant boon for school lunch programs as well as student eating habits, a new study found. Recently published in the journal Appetite, the study examined the impact of Chefs Move to Schools, an initiative of First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign. With an overriding goal of encouraging schoolchildren to make healthier meal choices, Chefs Move to Schools pairs volunteer professional chefs with schools to offer cooking education to kids as well as culinary advice to school food…
 
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    Deric's MindBlog

  • Status and the brain.

    1 Oct 2014 | 1:27 am
    I want to pass on this summary by Utevsky and Platt of the article by Noonan et al. (both are PLOS open source) on brain neural circuits that covary with an individual's place in the social hierarchy: Social hierarchy is a fact of life for many animals. Navigating social hierarchy requires understanding one's own status relative to others and behaving accordingly, while achieving higher status may call upon cunning and strategic thinking. The neural mechanisms mediating social status have become increasingly well understood in invertebrates and model organisms like fish and mice but until…
  • The good order - creativity needs routine

    30 Sep 2014 | 5:04 am
    I really liked David Brooks' recent OpEd piece in the NYTimes. It is one of many published comments praising Obama's recent speech at the United Nations on the world order, putting it in the context of the general conditions required for building and maintaining the kind of order required for creativity at individual, political, and global levels. The piece starts by noting the disciplined routines of creative writers (which makes me feel much better about my fuddy-duddy rigid morning schedule of thinking and writing from exactly 8:30 till 11:30 a.m. every weekday.) Some clips: ..Maya…
  • Hearing and imagination shape what we see.

    29 Sep 2014 | 2:42 am
    Vetter et al. have done the interesting experiment of blindfolding people and then scanning their brains while they listened to birds singing, traffic noise, or people talking. They were able to identify the category of sounds just by examining the pattern of activity in the primary visual cortex, thus making a nice demonstration of the interconnectedness of the brain's sensory systems.Highlights •Early visual cortex receives nonretinal input carrying abstract information •Both auditory perception and imagery generate consistent top-down input •Information feedback may be…
  • The Human Dynamic Clamp

    26 Sep 2014 | 4:28 am
    In my distant past when I was doing cellular neurophysiology we used a technique called the "voltage clamp", in which the electrophysiology equipment measuring a nerve signal was linked to a computer that could inject current to alter the signal's behavior in a bi-directional interaction, and thus test models for the ion fluxes underlying the signals. Dumas et al. ask if a similar approach could be applied to study human interactions: For example, were a human to interact with a model constructed to behave like him- or herself, might this tell us something about human beings and how they work…
  • Rules of implicit evaluation by race, religion, and age.

    25 Sep 2014 | 4:49 am
    Axt and collaborators look at a very large sample (N > 200,000) of people of varying race, religion, and age and find, that after ranking their own race, religion, or age most favorably, people rank remaining categories in the same hierarchy, suggesting that rules of social evaluation are pervasively embedded in culture and mind. The subjects in the study were American citizens who submitted data to Harvard's Project Implicit. Their abstract: The social world is stratified. Social hierarchies are known but often disavowed as anachronisms or unjust. Nonetheless, hierarchies may persist in…
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    Brain Blogger

  • The Phantom Sound Of Tinnitus

    Sara Adaes, PhD (c)
    30 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Anyone who has ever been to a loud nightclub has probably experienced that ringing in the ears that comes home with you. The feeling is uncomfortable, but it eventually disappears. Less fortunate are the 10-15% of people in the world that experience this continuously and, most likely, will experience it forever (and I am one of them). Tinnitus (a Latin word  meaning “ringing”) is a hearing disorder characterized by the conscious perception of a sound in the absence of a corresponding external acoustic stimulus. Tinnitus can be transient, but after having lasted longer than 12…
  • Thinking Slow About Thinking Fast – Part IV – A New Perspective on the Framing Effect

    Nisha Cooch, PhD
    27 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Our tendency to choose options that appear less valuable than alternative options (such as choosing to stick with our original choice in the Monty Hall Problem) is often cited as evidence for our irrationality. However, the view that we are irrational derives too from inconsistency in our preferences. Nobel Prize winner, Daniel Kahneman, and his colleague, Amos Tversky, described such inconsistency with the following example of the Framing Effect: In response to the news that a disease outbreak is expected to kill 600 people, 2 programs are proposed: Program 1 allows 200 people to be saved…
  • Treating Children and Teens Diagnosed with Schizophrenia

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    24 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    In this article, I will focus on treatment considerations regarding the diagnosis of schizophrenia in children and adolescents. This article on assessment of schizophrenia concerns the nature of psychological tests that evaluate the prevalence of schizophrenic symptoms in an individual child or adolescent. These specific tests, which rely on interview and self-report, are described as potentially useful in formulating a diagnosis of schizophrenia by a qualified clinician. There are several treatment strategies for helping one’s child or adolescent cope with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.
  • Weighing On Your Mind? Obesity, Cognition and Dementia

    Jennifer Gibson, PharmD
    21 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Obesity in mid-life is associated with a higher risk of dementia- including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – later in life. Though age is still the primary risk factor for dementia, lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity may play an important role in the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. Now, weight loss surgery is showing benefits in cognitive decline. Evidence has connected obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased blood glucose levels – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – to the onset of dementia even decades down the road.
  • Fighting Mental and Physical Illness by Reshaping Cities

    Lindsay Myers, MBA, MPH
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    A recently published study in The Lancet estimated that 40 percent of Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime – a trend which is largely due to obesity and inactivity. Since the 1990s, some public health professionals have turned their attention to the potential offered by environmental modifications to fight obesity and improve population health. The same environmental modifications might positively impact another public health problem: depression. “Obesity is a multicomponent disease arising from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors.
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    Mind Hacks

  • Buggin’ Out

    vaughanbell
    27 Sep 2014 | 9:06 am
    Sociology journal Transition has a fascinating article giving a history of the surprisingly frequent appearance of schizophrenia in rap music. In psychiatric circles, schizophrenia is considered a serious mental illness that causes delusions, hallucinations, and social withdrawal. But in rap, schizophrenia means something else: a mode of defiance, a boast, or a threat. The term appears frequently when describing competition between rappers. In “Speak Ya Clout,” the duo Gang Starr rhymes that they are “schizophrenic with rhyme plus we’re well organized” as a way of warning that they…
  • Spike activity 26-09-2014

    vaughanbell
    27 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Why most scientists don’t take Susan Greenfield seriously. A serious rebuttal for some poor scientific claims over at BishopBlog. The Guardian has a good profile of food and flavour scientist Charles Spence who specialises in sensory integration. Couvade syndrome: some men develop signs of pregnancy when their partners are pregnant. The Conversation has a piece on a genuinely intriguing condition. The Chronicle of Higher Education has an interesting piece on Why Freud Still Haunts Us. ‘GCHQ employs more than 100 dyslexic and…
  • Why our faith in cramming is mistaken

    tomstafford
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:47 am
    You may think you know your own mind, but when it comes to memory, research suggests that you don’t. If we’re trying to learn something, many of us study in ways that prevent the memories sticking. Fortunately, the same research also reveals how we can supercharge our learning. We’ve all had to face a tough exam at least once in our lives. Whether it’s a school paper, university final or even a test at work, there’s one piece of advice we’re almost always given: make a study plan. With a plan, we can space out our preparation for the test rather than relying on one or two…
  • Problems with Bargh’s definition of unconscious

    tomstafford
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:48 am
    I have a new paper out in Frontiers in Psychology: The perspectival shift: how experiments on unconscious processing don’t justify the claims made for them. There has been ongoing consternation about the reliability of some psychology research, particularly studies which make claims about unconscious (social) priming. However, even if we assume that the empirical results are reliable, the question remains whether the claims made for the power of the unconscious make any sense. I argue that they often don’t. Here’s something from the intro: In this commentary I draw attention to…
  • An earlier death

    vaughanbell
    14 Sep 2014 | 2:05 pm
    Journalism site The Toast has what I believe is the only first-person account of Cotard’s delusion – the belief that you’re dead – which can occur in psychosis. The article is by writer Esmé Weijun Wang who describes her own episode of psychosis and how she came to believe, and later unbelieve, that she was dead. It’s an incredibly evocative piece and historically, worth remembering. Somatic details figure heavily in these recollections: what I wore, what I looked like. I told myself, through mirrors and dressing-up and Polaroids and weighing myself, You have a…
 
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    Neuromarketing

  • One Word That Turns Work into Play

    Roger Dooley
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:44 am
    Surprising new research shows that introducing one word into the conversation can change how people feel about their work and significantly impact effort and outcomes. Most of us are part of teams. We group ourselves in companies, departments, projects, and [...]
  • Persuade Like a Con-Artist, Crowdlaunch Your Product, More… Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    26 Sep 2014 | 8:11 am
    Your weekend reading list for all things brain and marketing-related… My Stuff Jeremy Smith (@jeremysaid) is back with another great CRO post. His article, 4 Facts About Decision Making That Will Improve Conversion Rate Optimization delves into the psychology of [...]
  • 4 Facts About Decision Making That Will Improve Conversion Rate Optimization

    Jeremy Smith
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    Everything in conversion optimization comes down to the customer making a decision... Yes or no. That’s the clutch point in conversion optimization. Leading up to this decision is the process of decision making.
  • Starbucks Name-Botching, 10 Conversion Psych Resources, More… Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:02 am
    Here’s the most interesting content we found this week, followed by my own content here, at Forbes.com, and at The Brainfluence Podcast. Want to boost your conversion rates? Use psychology. Ritika Puri (@ritika_puri) has compiled a list of in-depth resources [...]
  • Two Words That Change How People Think of You

    Roger Dooley
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:18 am
    Almost certainly, there are two words that have been drilled into you as important since the day you started talking. Now, research shows these words have surprising power over how others perceive you. The words, as you may have guessed, [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • Dr. Dharma Singh Khalsa (Alzheimer’s Research & Prevention Foundation): “You’re not a prisoner of your DNA”

    Alvaro Fernandez
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:25 am
    Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D. What is your cur­rent job title and orga­ni­za­tion, and what excites you the most about work­ing there? As the Founding President and Medical Director at the Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation for over 20 years, I am more excited than ever about the possibilities for enhanced mental performance and brain longevity for everyone. Please tell us about your inter­est in brain health and performance. What areas are you most inter­ested in? What moti­vated you to pur­sue work in your field? In the beginning of my investigation, I discovered that…
  • To reduce ADHD epidemic, promote (concussion-free) sports and physical activity programs?

    SharpBrains
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:54 am
    Exercise Is ADHD Medication (The Atlantic): “This morning the medical journal Pediatrics published research that found kids who took part in a regular physical activity program showed important enhancement of cognitive performance and brain function. The findings…“demonstrate a causal effect of a physical program on executive control, and provide support for physical activity for improving childhood cognition and brain health.”… “If physical activity is established as an effective intervention for ADHD,” they continued, “it will also be important to address possible…
  • Update: Let’s transform brain health from “suffer-in-silence” to “let-me-take-control”

    SharpBrains
    26 Sep 2014 | 9:59 am
    Time for our September 2014 e-newsletter, fea­tur­ing a wealth of insights  and innovations reports…including four thought-provoking interviews with Sponsors of the 2014 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (October 28-30th). Enjoy! New perspectives at the frontier of Brain, Health & Innovation: Barbara Arrowsmith Young: Every kid should practice stress reduction and targeted cognitive exercises at school Michael Meagher (Cogniciti): Let’s transform brain health from “suffer-in-silence” to “let-me-take-control” Itamar Lesuisse (Peak): My interest in brain training stemmed from my…
  • Barbara Arrowsmith Young: Every kid should practice stress reduction and targeted cognitive exercises at school

    Alvaro Fernandez
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:26 am
    Barbara Arrowsmith Young What is your cur­rent job title and orga­ni­za­tion, and what excites you the most about work­ing there? As discussed in The Brain that Changes Itself and in my own book, The Woman Who Changed Her Brain, I launched the Arrowsmith Program, a suite of cognitive exercises–now in more that 60 schools–designed to strengthen weak cognitive areas that underlie a number of specific learning difficulties and disabilities. I did so based on my journey to overcome my own severe specific learning difficulties, and what excites me now is working with a group of dedicated…
  • Michael Meagher (Cogniciti): Let’s transform brain health from “suffer-in-silence” to “let-me-take-control”

    Alvaro Fernandez
    24 Sep 2014 | 7:07 am
    Michael Meagher What is your cur­rent job title and orga­ni­za­tion, and what excites you the most about work­ing there? As the President of Cogniciti, a spin-off from Baycrest reseach center and hospital, I am excited to help transform brain health from a reactive, “suffer-in-silence” space to a proactive, “let-me-take-control-of-my-health” space. Please tell us about your inter­est in brain health and performance. What areas are you most inter­ested in? What moti­vated you to pur­sue work in your field? Same as cardiac health has been transformed through earlier diagnosis…
 
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    Neuronarrative

  • Gut Feeling: How Bacteria Manipulates Your Brain

    David DiSalvo
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:40 pm
    The next time you can’t figure out why you’re suddenly craving a huge slab of ultra-decadent chocolate cake—consider the possibility that it’s not just you doing the craving. New research suggests that the armies of bacteria living in our guts can pull the strings in our brains to get what they want.read more
  • The Happiness Equation

    David DiSalvo
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:01 pm
    I can’t pretend to understand how the researchers developed the equation, but one word in their lengthy explanation resonates with my math-addled brain: expectations. After all the complex analyses, it really all comes down to what we expect and how strongly we expect it.read more
  • Why Is Being Alone With Our Thoughts So Hard?

    David DiSalvo
    9 Aug 2014 | 10:55 am
    Have we become so enraptured with gadgets, social media and the dull roar of crowds that we can’t stomach facing ourselves? read more
  • Why Profile Photos Are Liars

    David DiSalvo
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Psychology researchers want us to know something about our profile photo-centrism – it’s a lie, and it’s leading us to draw conclusions that likely have zero basis in reality.read more
  • Can Money Really Buy Happiness? Well, Maybe

    David DiSalvo
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:04 pm
    "Everyone has been told if you spend your money on life experiences, it will make you happier, but we found that isn't always the case," said Ryan Howell, an associate professor of psychology at SF State and co-author of the study. But "extremely material buyers, who represent about a third of the overall population, are sort of stuck." They aren't happy either way.read more
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    "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich

  • The Story of “Hack My Brain,” Todd Sampson, BrainHQ, and Me

    Dr. Merzenich
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:35 pm
    On September 19, 2014, at 8:00 p.m., the Science Channel will air a 3-part documentary called “Hack My Brain.” As the chief scientific consultant for the show, I helped the host, Todd Sampson, improve his memory, attention, and processing speed using BrainHQ. (If you want to try the same assessments and training Todd used, go […]The post The Story of “Hack My Brain,” Todd Sampson, BrainHQ, and Me appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • New Eye Test Can Detect Early Alzheimer’s

    Dr. Merzenich
    6 Aug 2014 | 11:35 am
    I wrote recently about some things that can increase or decrease amyloid beta protein in the body, and how the protein plays a role in Alzheimer’s disease. Now, scientists are working on an eye test that scans for amyloid beta deposits in the retina as a way to detect early Alzheimer’s. The research is still […]The post New Eye Test Can Detect Early Alzheimer’s appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Why Does Brain Speed Matter, and What Can I Do to Improve It?

    Dr. Merzenich
    12 Mar 2014 | 4:40 pm
    I just saw an article in Scientific American about why brain speed is important, how it decays as we age, and what the effects are on daily life over time. But this is nothing new: we have been talking about brain speed for years! Some highlights from the article include: “Studies suggest that the speed […]The post Why Does Brain Speed Matter, and What Can I Do to Improve It? appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell …

    Dr. Merzenich
    3 Feb 2014 | 3:23 pm
    We are big fans of Ginger Campbell, MD’s Brain Science Podcast series – she features fascinating neuroscience luminaries in her in-depth, hour-long interviews, including Norman Doidge, Jeff Hawkins, Sharon Begley, Edward Taub, and many more. Learn more and listen now >>> Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell About Brain Plasticity Posit Science […]The post Brain Science Podcast: Dr. Merzenich Talks with Ginger Campbell … appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Landmark Study Shows Benefits of BrainHQ Training Last 10 Years

    Dr. Merzenich
    14 Jan 2014 | 3:27 pm
    I am incredibly excited to announce that the scientists who ran the ACTIVE trial have reported that certain types of brain training—including one of the exercises in BrainHQ from Posit Science—can drive cognitive benefits that last 10 years. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, is the first to show such […]The post Landmark Study Shows Benefits of BrainHQ Training Last 10 Years appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
 
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Dr. Oz, Autism, and GMOs

    Steven Novella
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:34 am
    It is no longer news that Dr. Oz has long ago abandoned any pretense to scientific rigor and is simply another scaremongering hawker of snake oil and nonsense. Still, it’s hard not to marvel when he sinks to a new low. On a recent show Oz’s target was genetically modified organisms (GMO). This is not new for Oz, he has hosted anti-GMO activists in the past, warning his audience about non-existent health risks. This time around Oz and his guest are claiming that pesticides used with certain GMO varieties may cause autism. Why is it always autism? It’s likely at least partly…
  • How Our Brains Respond to Ambiguous Images

    Steven Novella
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:12 am
    A new study looks at how our brains respond to images of celebrities made ambiguous by morphing two images into one, such as the combination of Halle Berry and Angelina Jolie shown here. The question is – will our brains fire in a way that represents the details of the picture, or will they fire based upon how we perceive the picture? The researchers were able to study subjects who had small electrodes placed on the surface of their brains for clinical purposes. Such electrodes are capable of detecting the firing of a single brain neuron. They showed the subjects pictures of two…
  • FDA Takes On Essential Snake Oils

    Steven Novella
    26 Sep 2014 | 8:15 am
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is tasked with ensuring quality and transparency in the foods and drugs that are sold to consumers. This is a daunting task, and by all accounts the FDA is commonly understaffed, without the resources to thoroughly do its job. Further, politics often hamstrings the agency, so they don’t have the actual authority to do their job. The most egregious example is the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA). This law (courtesy of Hatch and Harkin) effectively removed “supplements” out of the control of the FDA, and broadly…
  • Newtown and FBI Crime Statistics

    Steven Novella
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:38 am
    On December 14, 2012, a disturbed shooter killed 20 children and 6 adult staff at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. This was a horrific event, and the community is still recovering. Almost immediately after the shooting, and continuing to this day, conspiracy theorists have been shoe-horning this tragic event into their preferred narrative, calling the event a “false flag” operation. In other words, they believe that no children were killed on that day. The entire event was staged by the powers that be as a pretext to take away the guns of law-abiding citizens. The claim is absurd…
  • Flavors of Nonsense

    Steven Novella
    23 Sep 2014 | 6:24 am
    I, like most people, like to categorize things. It helps me keep my mental space organized and tidy. A good system of categorization is also like a framework on which I can hang specific facts and details. Categories are most useful when they reflect underlying reality, rather than superficial or arbitrary features. Categories are therefore often at the nexus of facts and theory in science – they can organize the facts in a way that reflects the underlying theory.  You have to be cautious, however. Reality often does not cleave in clean straight lines. There are likely to be…
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • Encoding and Tracking of Outcome-Specific Expectancy in the Gustatory Cortex of Alert Rats

    Gardner, M. P. H., Fontanini, A.
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    In natural conditions, gustatory stimuli are typically expected. Anticipatory and contextual cues provide information that allows animals to predict the availability and the identity of the substance to be ingested. Recording in alert rats trained to self-administer tastants following a go signal revealed that neurons in the primary gustatory cortex (GC) can respond to anticipatory cues. These experiments were optimized to demonstrate that even the most general form of expectation can activate neurons in GC, and did not provide indications on whether cues predicting different tastants could…
  • A Role for the Human Substantia Nigra in Reinforcement Learning

    de Berker, A. O., Rutledge, R. B.
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
  • Two Protein N-Acetylgalactosaminyl Transferases Regulate Synaptic Plasticity by Activity-Dependent Regulation of Integrin Signaling

    Dani, N., Zhu, H., Broadie, K.
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    Using a Drosophila whole-genome transgenic RNAi screen for glycogenes regulating synapse function, we have identified two protein α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (pgant3 and pgant35A) that regulate synaptic O-linked glycosylation (GalNAcα1-O-S/T). Loss of either pgant alone elevates presynaptic/postsynaptic molecular assembly and evoked neurotransmission strength, but synapses appear restored to normal in double mutants. Likewise, activity-dependent facilitation, augmentation, and posttetanic potentiation are all suppressively impaired in pgant mutants. In non-neuronal…
  • Neurocognitive Mechanisms for Vocal Emotions: Sounds, Meaning, Action

    Lavan, N., Lima, C. F.
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
  • The Role of p75NTR in Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Structure and Function

    Boskovic, Z., Alfonsi, F., Rumballe, B. A., Fonseka, S., Windels, F., Coulson, E. J.
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    The role of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in adult cholinergic basal forebrain (cBF) neurons is unclear due to conflicting results from previous studies and to limitations of existing p75NTR-knock-out mouse models. In the present study we used a novel conditional knock-out line (ChAT-cre p75in/in) to assess the role of p75NTR in the cBF by eliminating p75NTR in choline acetyl-transferase-expressing cells. We show that the absence of p75NTR results in a lasting increase in cBF cell number, cell size, and cholinergic innervation to the cortex. Analysis of adult ChAT-cre p75in/in mice…
 
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    Brain Posts

  • Family Attachment and the Brain Cingulate Cortex

    29 Sep 2014 | 7:32 am
    Healthy family attachment provides a key element for social support and successful interpersonal relationships.Several brain regions as well as hormonal factors appear to modulate positive emotional responses to family members.I have previously reviewed several studies involving the prosocial effects of the hormone oxytocin and the related hormone vasopressin.Nicolas Rusch from the Department of Psychiatry at Ulm University in Germany along with colleagues in Brazil and London recently published a fMRI study of brain regions and family attachment.In this study, 34 healthy adults participated…
  • Why Women Give Better Gifts

    24 Sep 2014 | 9:37 am
    Consumer spending on gifts for birthdays and holidays is a multi-billion dollar big business.Despite this large economic impact, little research examines factors associated with gift recipient satisfaction.Selecting good gifts for others involves a complex social decision-making process related to judging the value hierarchy of others.A study from the Netherlands recently published in the journal PLOS One featured three experiments on gift selection in a series of men and women.The design of these experiments included:Study OneSubjects: 61 study pairs were identified who were involved in a…
  • The Social Brain: Weekend Reading Links II

    19 Sep 2014 | 6:53 am
    This month I have focussed on social neuroscience topics relevant to cognition and social function. Here are a few interesting abstracts culled from over 200 that I have reviewed from PubMed.Abstract links will have links to free full-text articles.I will be picking a few from this list for more discussion in posts for the remainder of September.Social Learning in HumansThis review examines the existing research on social learning in both humans and other animals. Social learning appears key in many animal species. Humans appear to have some common and distinct features of social…
  • Genetics of Social Skills: Oxytocin Receptor Gene

    18 Sep 2014 | 8:11 am
    Social neuroscience is an emerging emphasis in the field of neuroscience research.Social cognition is the subset of cognitive functions related to social processes and includes factors such as facial recognition, social memory and ability to form friendships and other social bonds.Impairment in social cognition is a known feature in autism, schizophrenia and other mental disorders. This type of impairment can produce significant problems in life adjustment, employment and human attachment.Genetic features appear to be important in human social cognition. Biological factors influence social…
  • Antidepressants Modulate Memory in the Healthy Brain

    17 Sep 2014 | 8:28 am
    The mechanism of antidepressant drug response is not well understood.One theory posits antidepressant effects are only seen in those with clinical depression leaving the healthy brain unchanged.In a previous post, I outlined a study demonstrating effects of antidepressants on brain connectivity measures in the healthy brain.A recent fMRI study extends our understanding of the potential mechanisms for antidepressant drugs.CT Cerqueira and colleagues from Brazil studied the effects of the antidepressant clomipramine in a series of human subjects without a personal or family history of…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • An Hour of After-School Exercise Linked to Better Cognitive Functioning

    Google News - Health
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:52 am
    Source: Google News - HealthA new study finds that at least 60 minutes of physical activity after school every day is not only beneficial for children's physical health, but it may also improve their cognitive functioning. Researchers found that children...
  • Iceland Announces Men-Only U.N. Meeting on Women

    ABC News - World News
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:51 am
    Source: ABC News - World NewsIceland announces 'unique' men-only UN conference on women, gender equality.
  • California Adopts Historic "Yes Means Yes" Rule on Sexual Consent

    The Guardian
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:51 am
    Source: The GuardianOfficials say legislation will begin a paradigm shift in how college campuses in California prevent and investigate sexual assaults Valenti: The future of campus rape prevention is yes means yes The governor of California, Jerry Brown, has signed a bill that makes the state the first in the United States to define when yes means yes and adopt requirements for colleges to follow when investigating sexual assault reports. State lawmakers last...
  • Amnesty Opposes Indonesia Law Punishing Gay Sex with Lashes

    Reuters - World News
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:51 am
    Source: Reuters - World NewsAmnesty International called for an immediate repeal of a new law in the Indonesian province of Aceh punishing anyone caught having gay sex or extramarital sex with 100 lashes, saying the legislation would stoke homophobia and harassment.
  • Rise in U.K. Trafficking, Slavery, and Exploitation

    BBC News - UK News
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:50 am
    Source: BBC News - UK NewsThe number of people trafficked for slavery or other exploitation in the UK has risen sharply to more than 2,700, the National Crime Agency says.
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    The Neurocritic

  • White House BRAIN Conference

    1 Oct 2014 | 3:35 am
    September 30 is the last day of the fiscal year for the US government. So it's no coincidence that President Obama's BRAIN Initiative1 ended the year with a bang. The NIH BRAIN Awards were announced on the last possible day of FY2014, coinciding with the White House BRAIN Conference. A total of $46 million was dispersed among 58 awards involving over 100 scientists.Census of Cell Types (RFA MH-14-215)  Tools for Cells and Circuits (RFA MH-14-216)  Next Generation Human Imaging (RFA MH-14-217)  Large-Scale Recording-Modulation - New Technologies (RFA NS-14-007)  Large-Scale…
  • Anthropomorphic Neuroscience Driven by Researchers with Large TPJs

    26 Sep 2014 | 4:51 am
    For immediate release — SEPTEMBER 26, 2014Research from the UCL lab of Professor Geraint Rees has proven that the recent craze for suggesting that rats have “regrets” or show “disappointment” is solely due to the size of the left temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) in the human authors of those papers (Cullen et al., 2014). This startling breakthrough was part of a larger effort to associate every known personality trait, political attitude, and individual difference with the size of a unique brain structure.Cullen and colleagues recruited 83 healthy behavioral neuroscientists and…
  • Should Policy Makers and Financial Institutions Have Access to Billions of Brain Scans?

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:18 am
    "Individual risk attitudes are correlated with the grey matter volume in the posterior parietal cortex suggesting existence of an anatomical biomarker for financial risk-attitude," said Dr Tymula.This means tolerance of risk "could potentially be measured in billions of existing medical brain scans." 1 -Gray matter matters when measuring risk toleranceLet's pretend that scientists have discovered a neural biomarker that could accurately predict a person's propensity to take financial risks in a lottery. Would it be ethical to release this information to policy makers? That seems to be the…
  • A Dangerous New Dish

    7 Sep 2014 | 11:26 pm
    Bibimbop Brugmansia ** Do NOT try this at home.Edible flowers can make for a beautiful garnish on salads and trendy Brooklyn cocktails, but these decorative flourishes can be a disaster for the oblivious amateur. An unusual case report in BMC Research Notes summarizes what happens when you sprinkle toxic flower petals on your bibimbop (Kim et al., 2014).A 64 year old Korean woman came to the emergency room with incoherent speech and fluctuations in attention, orientation and comprehension. She had called her daughter for help but couldn't remember why. (Hint: that's because she ingested…
  • Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

    31 Aug 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in the form of beautiful equations that are the envy of the softer sciences.xkcd: PurityThe enterprise…
 
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    The Beautiful Brain

  • Neuroaesthetics: The Gathering

    Noah Hutton
    4 Sep 2014 | 9:22 pm
    Top scientists and philosophers working at the intersection of art and neuroscience gather in New York City for the 2014 International Association of Empirical Aesthetics summit. Ville cranienne (Skull City). AndreÌ Masson, 1940. Drawing on paper. It’s hard to know how much we don’t know about the brain. The presence of vast unknowns in the field means that many current debates in neuroscience hinge on differing scales of inquiry and the significance of results from current methods. Are single neurons the place to look? How much weight do fMRI results bear? Do we actually even…
  • E.O. Wilson on the Brain

    Ben Ehrlich
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:39 pm
    In this month’s issue of Harper’s magazine, legendary biologist E.O. Wilson—the ant man who also authors books about the meaning of existence—takes on consciousness and the brain. The article, “On Free Will,” carries the unsurprising subtitle: “And how the brain is like a colony of ants.” He runs down the essential anatomical, functional, genetic and evolutionary information about the brain, defining the complex organ and its unique importance. Then, he relates the efforts of philosophers to find a physical basis for consciousness, which may or may…
  • Sculptor of Her Own Brain

    Ben Ehrlich
    16 May 2014 | 7:54 am
    Rebecca Kamen believes that artists and scientists have a similar mission, and she tries to reflect these similarities in her sculptures. Inspired by the work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, “the father of modern neuroscience,” some of her sculptures are on display at the National Institutes for Health, where she has been the artist in residence in the neuroscience program. PBS NewsHour has published an article about her story, called “Portrait of a dyslexic artist, who transforms neurons into ‘butterflies.'” Ramón y Cajal famously referred to the cells in our…
  • Science on Screen

    Ben Ehrlich
    27 Mar 2014 | 3:12 pm
    On March 31st, seventeen independent theaters in cities across the country will host Science on Screen, an evening pairing mainstream film and scientific presentation. Supported by the Coolidge Corner Theater and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Science on Screen will feature different programs nationwide If you live in New York City, for example, Brooklyn’s BAM is showing Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, followed by a discussion of emotion and memory with Joseph LeDoux, director of the Emotional Brain Institute at New York University. See if your local theater is…
  • Fridtjof the Great

    Ben Ehrlich
    24 Feb 2014 | 8:29 pm
    I never knew about Fridtjof Nansen. His 1887 doctoral thesis argued for the independence of the nerve cell, making him one of the earliest defenders of what would be called “the neuron doctrine.” He promptly quit neuroscience and went on an arctic expedition across Greenland. Then he went to the North Pole. He topped it all off with a Nobel Peace Prize, after serving his native Norway in the League of Nations for a decade. His lasting legacy, however, is probably the “Nansen passport” for stateless persons, still recognized by over fifty countries. “It is better…
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    The Neurocritic

  • White House BRAIN Conference

    The Neurocritic
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:35 am
    September 30 is the last day of the fiscal year for the US government. So it's no coincidence that President Obama's BRAIN Initiative1 ended the year with a bang. The NIH BRAIN Awards were announced on the last possible day of FY2014, coinciding with the White House BRAIN Conference. A total of $46 million was dispersed among 58 awards involving over 100 scientists.Census of Cell Types (RFA MH-14-215)  Tools for Cells and Circuits (RFA MH-14-216)  Next Generation Human Imaging (RFA MH-14-217)  Large-Scale Recording-Modulation - New Technologies (RFA NS-14-007)  Large-Scale…
  • Anthropomorphic Neuroscience Driven by Researchers with Large TPJs

    The Neurocritic
    26 Sep 2014 | 4:51 am
    For immediate release — SEPTEMBER 26, 2014Research from the UCL lab of Professor Geraint Rees has proven that the recent craze for suggesting that rats have “regrets” or show “disappointment” is solely due to the size of the left temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) in the human authors of those papers (Cullen et al., 2014). This startling breakthrough was part of a larger effort to associate every known personality trait, political attitude, and individual difference with the size of a unique brain structure.Cullen and colleagues recruited 83 healthy behavioral neuroscientists and…
  • Should Policy Makers and Financial Institutions Have Access to Billions of Brain Scans?

    The Neurocritic
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:18 am
    "Individual risk attitudes are correlated with the grey matter volume in the posterior parietal cortex suggesting existence of an anatomical biomarker for financial risk-attitude," said Dr Tymula.This means tolerance of risk "could potentially be measured in billions of existing medical brain scans." 1 -Gray matter matters when measuring risk toleranceLet's pretend that scientists have discovered a neural biomarker that could accurately predict a person's propensity to take financial risks in a lottery. Would it be ethical to release this information to policy makers? That seems to be the…
  • A Dangerous New Dish

    The Neurocritic
    7 Sep 2014 | 11:26 pm
    Bibimbop Brugmansia ** Do NOT try this at home.Edible flowers can make for a beautiful garnish on salads and trendy Brooklyn cocktails, but these decorative flourishes can be a disaster for the oblivious amateur. An unusual case report in BMC Research Notes summarizes what happens when you sprinkle toxic flower petals on your bibimbop (Kim et al., 2014).A 64 year old Korean woman came to the emergency room with incoherent speech and fluctuations in attention, orientation and comprehension. She had called her daughter for help but couldn't remember why. (Hint: that's because she ingested…
  • Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

    The Neurocritic
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in the form of beautiful equations that are the envy of the softer sciences.xkcd: PurityThe enterprise…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • The Intelligence in Our Hands

    Bruno Dubuc
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:34 pm
    The first crisp days of autumn are great for outdoor chores like chopping firewood, installing storm windows, and raking leaves. Distracted by the blazing fall foliage, you may sometimes find yourself performing complex tasks with your hands while your mind is clearly off somewhere else. It’s as if your hands had “a mind of their own.” But this mental aspect of manual work is not just a passing impression you may have; it’s also one of the hottest topics in cognitive science today. MIT Press has just published The Hand, an Organ of the Mind: What the Manual Tells the Mental. This…
  • Nervous and Immune Systems Closely Tied

    Bruno Dubuc
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:27 pm
    By the late 20th century, cognitive neuroscientists had recognized that they would never truly understand how the brain functions unless they also considered the body in which it does so. This concept of “embodied” cognition implies that the brain constantly maintains a dynamic relationship with the rest of the body, which in turn is totally immersed in its physical and social environment. This model contrasts sharply with others that compare the brain to a computer or treat it as a disembodied organ that simply manipulates symbolic representations of inputs to provide appropriate…
  • The myth of left-brained and right-brained personalities

    Bruno Dubuc
    18 Aug 2014 | 9:59 am
    One often reads that certain functions of the human brain are lateralized—for example, that the left hemisphere is more involved in language and the right in the processing of visuospatial information. One also often hears it said that some people are left-brained (meaning that they are analytical, logical, and focused on details) while others are right-brained (more subjective and creative, with more of a tendency to see things as a whole). But according to a study published on August 14, 2013 in the online journal PLOS ONE, although there is abundant evidence for the lateralization of…
  • Daniel Wegner: An Unforgettable Scientific Contribution

    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:48 pm
    For many people, the name of pioneering social psychologist Daniel Wegner will always be associated with a polar bear, because he famously used an image of this animal to demonstrate how hard it is to suppress a thought if someone simply asks you not to think about it. Wegner died on July 5, 2013 at the age of 65 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease characterized by degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord. Acknowledging his passing, the scientific community saluted him as one of the most original thinkers in his field. His friend and fellow psychologist Daniel…
  • Summer school in cognitive sciences 2014 : Web Science and the mind

    Bruno Dubuc
    1 Jul 2014 | 11:54 am
    Every two years, the Cognitive Sciences Institute of the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) holds a summer school on a selected topic in the cognitive sciences. In 2010, the topic was the origin of language, in 2012 it was the evolution and function of consciousness. This summer, from July 7 to 18, 2014, the school will be holding its 5th edition, and the topic will be web science and the mind. The school will be taught and attended by international specialists on the subject of distributed cognition in the brain, between brains, and between brains and computers. The speakers at this…
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    Your Brain Health

  • Does fasting improve mental acuity and help you live longer?

    Sarah McKay
    11 Sep 2014 | 5:13 pm
    Todays guest blog post comes from Dr Devika Garg, a fresh PhD in neurosciences from the National University of Singapore, with a passion for bringing complex science to the public in simple and engaging ways. She has interests in poetry, music, the creative ways neurons function to create complex animal behaviors, and the wonderful way […] The post Does fasting improve mental acuity and help you live longer? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • This is your brain on therapy

    Sarah McKay
    4 Sep 2014 | 1:53 pm
    Dr. Dan Metevier is a psychologist from Carlsbad, California. He works with a variety of clients and helps these people feel better about themselves, their lives, and their relationships. You can visit Dan’s website here. So, what really happens to your brain when you go to a therapist? Let’s start from the very beginning (a very good place […] The post This is your brain on therapy appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Why working too hard impairs your thinking.

    Sarah McKay
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:36 am
    This week’s blog post comes from Rebekah Lambert. Rebekah makes her living as marketing, content creation and copywriting freelancer at Unashamedly Creative and as head of Disruption for Discordia Zine. Rebekah has just begun a mission to improve the mental health and wellness outcomes for freelancers and entrepreneurs as one half of the Hacking Happiness team. You can follow her journey […] The post Why working too hard impairs your thinking. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Neuroplasticity: the battle in your brain

    Sarah McKay
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Today’s blog comes from my courageous friend and fellow brain blogger, Debbie Hampton, who writes over at The Best Brain Possible. In her words her blog provides: information and inspiration for anyone with a brain and desiring to improve it. The Battle in Your Brain When Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel, he had to work […] The post Neuroplasticity: the battle in your brain appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Are music lessons the key to smarter kids?

    Sarah McKay
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:30 pm
    My 4 year-old son Jamie started piano lessons last year. This might seem a little young, but the classes are designed to make learning music fun. Jamie’s teachers use an unique multi-sensory approach that engages the different senses: auditory, visual and kinaesthetic (movement). The kids learn the notes as: do, re, mi, fa, so, etc, and each note has […] The post Are music lessons the key to smarter kids? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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