Neuroscience

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  • Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic]

    Your Brain Health
    Sarah McKay
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:36 pm
    › With BIG thanks to EyeWire and Visually.  The post Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Bad Relationships Can Kill You…

    Integrative Law Institute
    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    7 Jun 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession A study released recently found that stressful relationships directly correlate with high blood pressure in women. “What we observed was as the amount of negativity in relationships increased, risk of hypertension [in women] also increased,” reports  Rodlescia Sneed, co-author of the study.  She and  Sheldon Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University,  looked at data from  1,502 healthy adults over 50 contained in a longitudinal study of more than 26,000 Americans…
  • Brain Activity in Sex Addiction Mirrors That of Drug Addiction

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    11 Jul 2014 | 1:25 pm
    A new neuroimaging study finds pornography triggers brain activity of sex addicts much the same way as drugs trigger the brains of drug addicts.
  • The Pain Of Being A Redhead

    Brain Blogger
    Sara Adaes, PhD (c)
    15 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Redheads comprise around 1% of the world’s population, having the least common hair color found in humans. Redheads can most easily be spotted in Scotland, England and Ireland. In Scotland, were the highest proportion is found, only 13% of the population has red hair. Red hair, as well as fair skin and freckles, is associated with genetic variations of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R). Melanocortin receptors (there are 5) bind melanocortin peptides, a group of peptide hormones that are produced in the pituitary gland and that are all derived from the same precursor,…
  • Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease – What’s The Link?

    Brain Blogger
    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Diabetes mellitus is an emerging global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. This systemic disease affects the blood sugar level causing far-reaching consequences for the human body. Diabetes affects the blood vessels and nerves of the body and causes long-term complications. During the early stages of disease, the damage caused by the high blood sugar level is not very obvious but after several years of poorly controlled diabetes, every organ of the body starts to show the signs and symptoms of disease-related deterioration. Diabetes can lead to dementia Most of the…
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

    22 Jul 2014 | 10:06 am
    New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which this signalling occurs.
  • Study reveals 'unhappiest' cities in the U.S.

    22 Jul 2014 | 7:39 am
    New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.
  • Schizophrenia's genetic 'skyline' rising as genetic code linked to illness grows

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:17 am
    The largest genomic dragnet of any psychiatric disorder to date has unmasked 108 chromosomal sites harboring inherited variations in the genetic code linked to schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. By contrast, the 'skyline' of such suspect variants associated with the disorder contained only 5 significant peaks in 2011. Researchers combined data from all available schizophrenia genetic samples to boost statistical power high enough to detect subtle effects on risk.
  • Neuroprotective role of immune cell discovered

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to research. "Our findings suggest the innate immune system helps protect the brain after injury or during chronic disease, and this role should be further studied," the lead researcher said.
  • Low strength brain stimulation may be effective for depression

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:14 am
    Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular ECT treatments before a full response is achieved. Thus, there is an impetus to develop antidepressant treatments that act to rapidly improve mood. Low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) is one such potential new treatment with rapid mood-elevating effects, report scientists.
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Uncertain Dots 19 [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:28 pm
    In which our hangout turns nineteen; we may need to look into a special guest for the 20th, or something. Or maybe save guest stars for the one after that, when it can drink. Anyway, Rhett and I chat about grading, lab reports, why Excel sucks, and an online experiment that we really ought to do if we only had the time. Some links: – Why Does Excel Suck So Much?, and “Line Plot” is Never the Right Choice. Perennial favorites on the blog. – How Do I Kill the Squirrels Who Are Eating My Car?, another constant source of a small amount of traffic. – Rhett’s…
  • Researchers develop innovative way to detect fake malaria drugs that could save lives, deter counterfeiting [The Pump Handle]

    Kim Krisberg
    22 Jul 2014 | 2:34 pm
    It looks like a simple piece of paper and it’s nearly as cheap, ideally costing just pennies. But despite its small size, it’s poised to make an enormous impact and potentially save thousands of lives. It’s a new test to spot counterfeit versions of the drug artesunate, which is one of the most important drugs used to treat malaria, a mosquito-borne disease that affects hundreds of millions of people every year. Based on the science of microfluidics, researchers at Oregon State University developed an easy-to-use and inexpensive testing kit that patients and health care providers can…
  • Is Matt Entenza really from outstate Minnesota? No, he is not. [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:48 am
    This is a followup on my earlier post (see “How do you say “Surprise” in Norwegian? The word is “Entenza.” I am not making that up” also reposted here) on Matt Entenza’s bid for the DFL (Democratic Party) Primary candidacy for Minnesota State Auditor. Entenza claims he is from Greater Minnesota, and thus, would do a better job representing the interests of Greater Minnesotans. This implies that highly acclaimed sitting State Auditor and candidate for re-election Rebecca Otto is not doing well in this area. In fact, she is doing very well. She is recognized for her fair…
  • The Expansion of Antarctic Sea Ice and Self Correcting Science [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:25 am
    One of the things climate change science deniers say, to throw you off, is that Antarctic sea ice is expanding. They even claim that the amount of expansion of Antarctic sea ice offsets the dramatic retreat of Arctic sea ice (see this for the latest on the Arctic). I’ve even seen it argued, in that famous peer-reviewed publication Twitter, that there is an inter-polar teleconnection that guarnatees that when the ice on one end of the earth expands the ice on the other end of the earth contracts, and visa versa, so everything is fine. That Antarctic Sea ice is expanding has become…
  • Current Status of Arctic Sea Ice Extent [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:11 am
    As it does every summer, the Arctic Sea ice is melting off. Over the last several years, the amount of sea ice that melts by the time it hits minimum in September has generally been increasing. So, how’s it doing now? The graph above shows the 1981-2010 average plus or minus two standard deviations. Before going into more detail than that, you should look at the following graphic. The top chart shows the march of Arctic Sea ice melt for first ten years of the baseline data set only, and the bottom chart shows the last ten years of the same data set. This tells us that the two Standard…
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    Deric Bownds' MindBlog

  • Blue is warmer than red?

    22 Jul 2014 | 4:06 am
    Red colors are arousing, blue colors calming, so at first the results of Ho et al. seem counter-intuitive. A red object at the same temperature as a blue object feels colder, and they suggest that this is because our prior expectation from the red color that it should be warmer biases our perception to make it seem cooler than it is. It is commonly believed that reddish color induces warm feelings while bluish color induces cold feelings. We, however, demonstrate an opposite effect when the temperature information is acquired by direct touch. Experiment 1 found that a red object, relative to…
  • Ecstasy (MDMA) and LSD as therapeutic drugs

    21 Jul 2014 | 3:14 am
    Kupferschmidt offers two pieces in Science magazine on using two currently banned classes of drugs for therapeutic purposes: the party drug ecstacy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA), and hallucinogenic compounds derived from fungus or mushrooms (LSD and psilocybin).NDMA activates brain receptors for dopamine and noradrenaline and releases serotonin from nerve endings, leading to the characteristic feeling of euphoria that made it popular in clubs and at dance events. One study in which 10 out of 12 PTSD patients no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD after two months of…
  • Feeling the social touch being observed in others.

    18 Jul 2014 | 4:47 am
    Interesting work by Bolognini et al. on our mirroring of the emotions of others : Touch has an emotional and communicative meaning, and it plays a crucial role in social perception and empathy. The intuitive link between others’ somatosensations and our sense of touch becomes ostensible in mirror-touch synesthesia, a condition in which the view of a touch on another person’s body elicits conscious tactile sensations on the observer’s own body. This peculiar phenomenon may implicate normal social mirror mechanisms. Here, we show that mirror-touch interference effects, synesthesia-like…
  • Brain activity can reveal whom someone is thinking about.

    17 Jul 2014 | 4:04 am
    A collaboration between five different research centers shows that in predicting or imagining the behavior of others based on their personality the brain relys on the same network of regions that support other forms of mental simulation, such as remembering the past and planning for the future: The behaviors of other people are often central to envisioning the future. The ability to accurately predict the thoughts and actions of others is essential for successful social interactions, with far-reaching consequences. Despite its importance, little is known about how the brain represents people…
  • Response of large scale brain networks to acute stress.

    16 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    I pass on this interesting summary and graphic by Hermans et al. Exposure to acute stress prompts a reallocation of resources to a salience network, promoting fear and vigilance, at the cost of an executive control network. After stress subsides, resource allocation to these two networks reverses, which normalizes emotional reactivity and enhances higher-order cognitive processes important for long-term survival.Schematic anatomical overview of salience and executive control networks. The sphere sizes illustrate the relative sizes of the clusters that co-activate with the respective networks.
 
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    Brain Blogger

  • Memories Are Made of These

    Dario Dieguez, Jr, PhD
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Since the early 1900s, scientists have pondered an age old question: what are memories made of? In the 1920s, Karl Lashley embarked on his famous journey to find “the engram” – the place in the brain where memories are stored. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed his famous postulate of how memories could be formed, insisting that brain “cells that fire together, wire together” as part of a “cell assembly.” Since those early days of neuroscience, scientists have worked extensively to characterize brain mechanisms that could support memory formation. The first support for Hebb’s idea…
  • Self-Help for Schizophrenics

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    In spite of the existence of stigma, the first crucial step in dealing with schizophrenia is acceptance by that individual that he or she has a mental illness. This acceptance will allow him to deal more effectively with his life and move on with a lifestyle that is perhaps different from that of an ordinary person. Acceptance of one’s mental illness and the life task modifications that are involved in existing as a schizophrenic in the world are essential to dealing with schizophrenia with a modicum of success. Noteworthy is the fact that denial of having a mental illness is likely to be a…
  • The Pain Of Being A Redhead

    Sara Adaes, PhD (c)
    15 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Redheads comprise around 1% of the world’s population, having the least common hair color found in humans. Redheads can most easily be spotted in Scotland, England and Ireland. In Scotland, were the highest proportion is found, only 13% of the population has red hair. Red hair, as well as fair skin and freckles, is associated with genetic variations of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R). Melanocortin receptors (there are 5) bind melanocortin peptides, a group of peptide hormones that are produced in the pituitary gland and that are all derived from the same precursor,…
  • Psychological Factors Predict Soccer Injuries

    Lindsay Myers, MBA, MPHc
    12 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    As the World Cup continues in Brazil, several star players have been left out due to injuries: French winger Franck Ribery due to a back problem, Colombia’s striker Radamel Falcao out with a torn ACL, Germany’s Marco Reus’ ankle injury, Italy’s midfielder Riccardo Montolivo’s broken tibia, and Theo Walcott of England as the result of a knee issue. Awareness of psychological variables can be useful to health professions and coaches who work with players of various levels. An estimated 65 to 95 percent of elite players sustain a performance-limiting injury in a single season,…
  • Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease – What’s The Link?

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Diabetes mellitus is an emerging global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. This systemic disease affects the blood sugar level causing far-reaching consequences for the human body. Diabetes affects the blood vessels and nerves of the body and causes long-term complications. During the early stages of disease, the damage caused by the high blood sugar level is not very obvious but after several years of poorly controlled diabetes, every organ of the body starts to show the signs and symptoms of disease-related deterioration. Diabetes can lead to dementia Most of the…
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    Mind Hacks

  • Towards a scientifically unified therapy

    vaughanbell
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Today’s edition of Nature has an excellent article on the need to apply cognitive science to understanding how psychological therapies work. Psychological therapies are often called ‘talking treatments’ but this is often a misleading name. Talking is essential, but it’s not where most of the change happens. Like seeing a personal trainer in the gym, communication is key, but it’s the exercise which accounts for the changes. In the same way, psychological therapy is only as effective as the experience of putting changes into practice, but we still know relatively…
  • Why do we bite our nails?

    tomstafford
    15 Jul 2014 | 12:51 am
    It can ruin the appearance of your hands, could be unhygienic and can hurt if you take it too far. So why do people do it? Biter Tom Stafford investigates What do ex-British prime minster Gordon Brown, Jackie Onassis, Britney Spears and I all have in common? We all are (or were) nail biters. It’s not a habit I’m proud of. It’s pretty disgusting for other people to watch, ruins the appearance of my hands, is probably unhygienic and sometimes hurts if I take it too far. I’ve tried to quit many times, but have never managed to keep it up. Lately I’ve been wondering…
  • The concept of stress, sponsored by Big Tobacco

    vaughanbell
    14 Jul 2014 | 2:31 pm
    NPR has an excellent piece on how the scientific concept of stress was massively promoted by tobacco companies who wanted an angle to market ‘relaxing’ cigarettes and a way for them to argue that it was stress, not cigarettes, that was to blame for heart disease and cancer. They did this by funding, guiding and editing the work of renowned physiologist Hans Selye who essentially founded the modern concept of stress and whose links with Big Tobacco have been largely unknown. For the past decade or so, [Public Health Professor Mark] Petticrew and a group of colleagues in London have…
  • Spike activity 11-07-2014

    vaughanbell
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:05 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Your Brain Is On the Brink of Chaos. Nautilus has an interesting piece on chaos the and the brain. Neuroskeptic has a good Q&A with Zach Mainen, one of the originators of the NeuroFuture open letter demanding reform of the Human Brain Project. There’s an open-access special issue on epilepsy in the latest edition of Nature. The New York Times has a good piece on developments towards brain implants for cognitive enhancement. Phantom limb pain tortures amputees and puzzles scientists. A man in Cambodia cycles round the country and…
  • A thought lab in the sun

    vaughanbell
    12 Jul 2014 | 1:25 am
    Neuroscientist Karl Friston, being an absolute champ, in an interview in The Lancet Psychiatry “I get up very late, I go and smoke my pipe in the conservatory, hopefully in the sunshine with a nice cup of coffee, and have thoughts until I can raise the energy to have a bath. I don’t normally get to work until mid day.” I have to say, I have a very similar approach which is getting up very early, drinking Red Bull, not having any thoughts, and raising the energy to catch a bus to an inpatient ward. The man clearly doesn’t know the good life when he sees it. The Lancet…
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • PTSD Treatment and Large Scale Propranolol Trials

    Adam Kolber
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:10 am
    Emily Anthes discusses memory dampening here, including some helpful information about ongoing, large scale trials of propranolol to treat PTSD in those who already have it. Here's an excerpt (footnote omitted): Perhaps, researchers hypothesized, propranolol could weaken emotional memories if...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:39 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): The pill to banish painful memories—forget it!, Practical Ethics In The Popular Press: The Moral Hazards and Legal Conundrums of Our Robot-Filled Future, Wired The Trouble With Brain Science, New York Times Opinion Pages Scientists...
  • Tenure-Track Position at U. of Ottawa Faculty of Law

    Adam Kolber
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:43 am
    via Jennifer Chandler: The Common Law Section at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law invites applications for professorial positions. The Common Law Section invites applications for two tenure-track positions, commencing at the level of Assistant Professor. A more experienced...
  • Interdisciplinary Conference on Love and Human Agency

    Adam Kolber
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    via Agnieszka Jaworska and see the poster here: Download LHA Conference poster Love and Human Agency, an interdisciplinary research project supported by the John Templeton Foundation, is pleased to announce an interdisciplinary conference on Love and Human Agency, to be...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:55 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Is It Time To Redraw the Map of the Brain?, Neuroskeptic In The Popular Press: Discovery of new means to erase pain, Science Daily The pill to banish painful memories—forget it!, Practical Ethics Brain fog,...
 
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    Neuromarketing

  • A Super-Simple Way to Make Your Prices Seem Lower… With One Catch

    Roger Dooley
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:08 am
    Want to make your prices seem lower without actually changing them? Here's a research-based technique that will do exactly that, with one small catch... it doesn't work equally well for male and female customers!
  • Be Like Bond, Use Persuasion Psychology, and More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    18 Jul 2014 | 7:15 am
    We’re playing catchup after a rare vacation, so here’s the best of the best for the last couple of weeks! Who doesn’t want to be James Bond, at least when he isn’t being tortured by a sadistic villain? I’m sure some 007 movie buff will provide a counter-example, but I don’t recall the fictional secret [...]
  • A Totally Bizarre Way to To Get More Phone Leads

    Roger Dooley
    16 Jul 2014 | 4:14 am
    My recent podcast interview with Brian Massey (@bmassey), aka The Conversion Scientist, had plenty of practical takeaways, but one of my favorites was Brian’s description of a test he ran to boost phone leads. Brian’s firm was charged with trying to turn more visitors into phone inquiries. When they tested different combinations of web lead [...]
  • Neuromarketing, From Sydney to Stockholm

    Roger Dooley
    7 Jul 2014 | 6:05 am
    We’ve got some exciting and varied speaking engagements lined up in the next few months, and I hope to meet at least a few readers from around the globe. Sydney. Coming up very soon is my longest trip for 2014, the Creative Fuel conference in Sydney, Australia, on July 28. My topic is Neuromarketing and [...]
  • Giant Conversion Booster, Happy Design, More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    27 Jun 2014 | 2:17 pm
    Here’s our curated list of some great content we found this week! I’m a complete believer in A/B testing, and I’m always skeptical of sure-fire techniques. But a post by Brian Dean (@Backlinko) shows some dramatic results achieved without exhaustive testing. Read Case Study – How I Increased Conversions by 785% in One Day (Without [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • Debunking Myers-Briggs personality test: Can we pigeon­hole people?

    SharpBrains
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:16 am
    Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (Vox): “The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is probably the most widely used personality test in the world…The only problem? The test is completely meaningless… The test claims that, based on 93 questions, it can group all the people of the world into 16 different discrete “types”…Even Jung warned that his personality “types” were just rough tendencies he’d observed, rather than strict classifications. Several analyses have shown the test is totally ineffective at predicting people’s success in various jobs, and that about half…
  • Upgrading Education and Health in light of Neuroscience: The Frontier of Gaming?

    SharpBrains
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:20 am
    We had a great event last Thursday in London to discuss the future of applied neuroscience and gaming. Thank you, Brainbow/ Peak team, for hosting us, and Strategic North for helping promote it! Many insights were shared. Perhaps one of the main take-aways was the significant opportunity at hand to leverage big data in order to personalize and refine brain training methodologies, helping brain training transfer from the training itself into real-world benefits that enhance the user’s personal and professional life. To learn more: Book — The Sharp­Brains Guide to Brain Fit­ness:…
  • How to improve memory skills and remember what you read: Beyond phonics and “whole language”

    Dr. Bill Klemm
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:16 am
    Despite the increasing visual media we are increasingly exposed to, reading is still an important skill. Whether it is school textbooks, online newspapers or regular books, people still read, though not as much as they used to. One reason that many people don’t read much is that they don’t read well. For them, it is slow, hard work and they don’t remember as much as they should. Why? You would think that schools teach kids how to read well. Schools do try. I work with middle-school teachers and they tell me that many students are 2–3 years behind grade level in reading proficiency. No…
  • One more reason to improve education and cardiovascular health in developing countries: to delay (underestimated) Alzheimer’s Disease

    SharpBrains
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:29 am
    Alzheimer’s Cases Severely Underestimated in Developing Nations (Bloomberg): “Alzheimer’s cases are greatly underestimated in East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and Colombia, researchers said, which may lead to poor policy making and inadequate health-care services. Alzheimer’s Disease International revised their global estimate of people with dementia to 44 million people from 36 million, based on a review of studies presented today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen… In contrast, studies have shown that new cases of dementia are starting later in…
  • Alzheimer’s disease can be delayed through lifestyle: New, large study joins growing chorus

    SharpBrains
    15 Jul 2014 | 9:35 am
    Hard Evidence We Can Slow Alzheimer’s By Exercising The Body And The Mind (Forbes): “Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most feared diagnoses among patients…once the disease has been diagnosed, there is nothing modern medicine can do to stop it. But it can be slowed, and a new study presented by researchers at the Karolinska Institut in Sweden gives some of the strongest evidence yet as to how: through physical exercise, through mental exercises and social interaction, by eating a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and by monitoring the same risk factors that lead to…
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    Neuronarrative

  • Your Profile Photo Is a Liar

    David DiSalvo
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Psychology researchers want us to know something about our profile photo-centrism – it’s a lie, and it’s leading us to draw conclusions that likely have zero basis in reality.read more
  • Can Money Really Buy Happiness? Well, Maybe

    David DiSalvo
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:04 pm
    "Everyone has been told if you spend your money on life experiences, it will make you happier, but we found that isn't always the case," said Ryan Howell, an associate professor of psychology at SF State and co-author of the study. But "extremely material buyers, who represent about a third of the overall population, are sort of stuck." They aren't happy either way.read more
  • How Your Blood Sugar Could Be Wrecking Your Marriage

    David DiSalvo
    8 May 2014 | 5:19 pm
    We’ve all known people who should have to wear a flashing red DANGER! sign if they miss lunch, though even without the warning we instinctively know to steer clear if someone is running on empty. A grumbling stomach means dropping blood sugar, and most of us know that means trouble -- but could the glucose crash be crashing our relationships far more than we realize?read more
  • Which of Us Are the Most Trusting?

    David DiSalvo
    29 Apr 2014 | 8:14 am
    A new study is giving the mistrustful among us something to consider: intelligence strongly correlates with generalized trust. “Generalized trust” in this case refers to a belief that most people can be trusted—that, on average, your fellow man or woman is probably a good egg.read more
  • How Video Games Can Help Us Achieve Mindfulness

    David DiSalvo
    14 Mar 2014 | 7:25 am
    University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers see the new genre of video games as just the beginning of a focus-enhancing revolution in digital tech. Through an initiative called Games+Learning+Society (GLS), they are pioneering efforts that marry entertainment with enrichment, and building it all on a platform of solid science.read more
 
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Aliens are Sinners

    Steven Novella
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:21 am
    To paraphrase Carl Sagan: in one unremarkable galaxy among hundreds of billions, there is an unremarkable star among hundreds of billions of stars in that one galaxy. Around that star revolves a world with life. Some people who live on that world believe they are the center of the universe. Sagan nicely puts into perspective how absurd it is to believe, given our current knowledge of the cosmos, that we are the center of all things, either physically at the literal center, or metaphorically as in, we are the most important things in the universe. This is a childish view, held by our ancestors…
  • Moon Hoax Anomaly Hunting

    Steven Novella
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:21 am
    Yesterday, July 20th, was the 45th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the surface of the moon, and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin becoming the first and second humans to walk on the surface of another world. This is, to be sure, one of the greatest achievements of the human species. There are those, however, who claim that we never sent astronauts to the moon, that the entire thing was an elaborate hoax by the US, meant to intimidate our rivals with our spacefaring prowess. As is typical of most grand conspiracy theories, they have no actual evidence to support their claim. None of the many…
  • New Organic Farming Meta-analysis – What Does it Really Show?

    Steven Novella
    18 Jul 2014 | 5:26 am
    The Guardian’s headline reads: Clear differences between organic and non-organic food, study finds. While this article was better than most in including some caveats, it was clearly favorable to the conclusions in the study, and failed, in my opinion, to properly put the new study into an informative context. How does this new study add to the literature looking at the safety and health effect of organic produce vs conventional produce? First, the study is a meta-analysis of 343 prior studies looking at nutrient content, pesticide, and heavy metal contamination of produce. It is not a…
  • European Commission Human Brain Project Hubbub

    Steven Novella
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:16 am
    In 2013 the European Commission awarded $1.3 billion to a project to simulate the human brain in a supercomputer. While everyone is excited about this prospect, and welcomes the infusion of cash, recently the project has come under public criticism. More than 180 neuroscientists signed an open letter criticizing the way the project is being managed. The letter states: “We believe the HBP is not a well-conceived or implemented project and that it is ill suited to be the centerpiece of European neuroscience.” There appear to be two main points to the criticism – the first is that the…
  • BBC Fail on Acupuncture Documentary

    Steven Novella
    15 Jul 2014 | 5:26 am
    Alternative Medicine’s best friend, and in my opinion largely responsible for what popularity it has, is a gullible media. I had thought we were turning a corner, and the press were over the gushing maximally clueless approach to CAM, and were starting to at least ask some probing questions (like, you know, does it actually work), but a 2006 BBC documentary inspires a more pessimistic view. The documentary is part of a BBC series hosted by Kathy Sykes: Alternative Medicine, The Evidence. This episode is on acupuncture. The episode is from 2006, but was just posted on YouTube as a…
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • I've got a date with a neuroscientist

    Kate
    17 Jul 2014 | 8:37 am
    (from the neuroscientist who took my knitting class this week) Dear Kate, Thank you so much for introducing me to knitting! The class was a lot of fun and I’d love to come for a few more but I am leaving on holidays on August 4th so unfortunately I won’t be there for the scheduled part 2. I hope we will meet again for a session of knitting in the near future. Best wishes *** Oh that’s too bad! I mean, too bad that you won’t be there — holidays are always a good thing. But actually, if you’d like, I’d be happy to meet up with you before you leave for…
  • Oatmeal

    davisbrotherlylove
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    There are identity shifts and there are shifts in ways of thinking… not all for the better. As an example of this, let me walk you through a bit of what I’ve been thinking over the past day or so.  Those of you who have followed me for a while know that I am very much interested in the brain and how it works. I am sure that this has its origins in the fact that my older brother is autistic. He is also low functioning and nonverbal. It has been a dream of mine to actually be able to connect with him. This has not come to pass over my lifetime and I am now resigned to accept that.
  • New hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Healthinnovations
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Researchers from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University have discovered that a re
  • Alzheimer's Disease: Overview

    Indra
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:51 pm
    [Let me start by apologizing for the lack of posts for almost two months. As I am just getting this blog started, I've been trying to figure out the best way to explore research topics comprehensively without posts becoming so long that amateur readers become bored a quater of the way through. The best way to do that seems to be writing research focused articles in several instalments. For the next few weeks, we will be covering Alzheimer's disease, starting today with the overview. This idea was borrowed from the course formatting of Coursera, which is an incredible learning resource for…
  • How do talking therapies work? Leading scientists call for collaboration

    psychologymagpie
    16 Jul 2014 | 4:10 pm
    “How does one human talking to another, as occurs in psychological therapy, bring about changes in brain activity and cure or ease mental disorders? We don’t really know. We need to.” So begins a great article published in Nature today, calling for more collaboration between clinical psychology and neuroscience. It calls for a three-pronged approach: 1. Uncover the mechanisms for existing psychological treatments 2. Optimise psychological treatments and generate new ones 3. Forge links between clinical and lab researchers The article also echoes a trend in demanding parity…
 
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • A Hybrid Electrical/Chemical Circuit in the Spinal Cord Generates a Transient Embryonic Motor Behavior

    Knogler, L. D., Ryan, J., Saint-Amant, L., Drapeau, P.
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Spontaneous network activity is a highly stereotyped early feature of developing circuits throughout the nervous system, including in the spinal cord. Spinal locomotor circuits produce a series of behaviors during development before locomotion that reflect the continual integration of spinal neurons into a functional network, but how the circuitry is reconfigured is not understood. The first behavior of the zebrafish embryo (spontaneous coiling) is mediated by an electrical circuit that subsequently generates mature locomotion (swimming) as chemical neurotransmission develops. We describe…
  • Prolonged Adenosine A1 Receptor Activation in Hypoxia and Pial Vessel Disruption Focal Cortical Ischemia Facilitates Clathrin-Mediated AMPA Receptor Endocytosis and Long-Lasting Synaptic Inhibition in Rat Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapses: Differential Regulation of GluA2 and GluA1 Subunits by p38 MAPK and JNK

    Chen, Z., Xiong, C., Pancyr, C., Stockwell, J., Walz, W., Cayabyab, F. S.
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Activation of presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) causes substantial synaptic depression during hypoxia/cerebral ischemia, but postsynaptic actions of A1Rs are less clear. We found that A1Rs and GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs) form stable protein complexes from hippocampal brain homogenates and cultured hippocampal neurons from Sprague Dawley rats. In contrast, adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) did not coprecipitate or colocalize with GluA2-containing AMPARs. Prolonged stimulation of A1Rs with the agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) caused adenosine-induced persistent synaptic…
  • Sounds Activate Visual Cortex and Improve Visual Discrimination

    Feng, W., Stormer, V. S., Martinez, A., McDonald, J. J., Hillyard, S. A.
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    A recent study in humans (McDonald et al., 2013) found that peripheral, task-irrelevant sounds activated contralateral visual cortex automatically as revealed by an auditory-evoked contralateral occipital positivity (ACOP) recorded from the scalp. The present study investigated the functional significance of this cross-modal activation of visual cortex, in particular whether the sound-evoked ACOP is predictive of improved perceptual processing of a subsequent visual target. A trial-by-trial analysis showed that the ACOP amplitude was markedly larger preceding correct than incorrect pattern…
  • Emergence of Feature-Specific Connectivity in Cortical Microcircuits in the Absence of Visual Experience

    Ko, H., Mrsic-Flogel, T. D., Hofer, S. B.
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    In primary visual cortex (V1), connectivity between layer 2/3 (L2/3) excitatory neurons undergoes extensive reorganization after the onset of visual experience whereby neurons with similar feature selectivity form functional microcircuits (Ko et al., 2011, 2013). It remains unknown whether visual experience is required for the developmental refinement of intracortical circuitry or whether this maturation is guided intrinsically. Here, we correlated the connectivity between V1 L2/3 neurons assayed by simultaneous whole-cell recordings in vitro to their response properties measured by…
  • A New Pathway Mediating Social Effects on the Endocrine System: Female Presence Acting via Norepinephrine Release Stimulates Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone in the Paraventricular Nucleus and Suppresses Luteinizing Hormone in Quail

    Tobari, Y., Son, Y. L., Ubuka, T., Hasegawa, Y., Tsutsui, K.
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Rapid effects of social interactions on transient changes in hormonal levels are known in a wide variety of vertebrate taxa, ranging from fish to humans. Although these responses are mediated by the brain, neurochemical pathways that translate social signals into reproductive physiological changes are unclear. In this study, we analyzed how a female presence modifies synthesis and/or release of various neurochemicals, such as monoamines and neuropeptides, in the brain and downstream reproductive hormones in sexually active male Japanese quail. By viewing a female bird, sexually active males…
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    The Brain Understanding Itself

  • Full Access to inTime Video Series

    Alex Doman
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:58 pm
    During the launch of inTime earlier this year we were very honored to have The Rockefeller University host us in their Science and Lecture Series for inTime: Intercultural Rhythms, Music, Sound and Science. The event was a panel discussion with fellow inTime producers Sheila Allen, Nacho Arimany and me, moderated by neuroscientist Dr. Kamran Fallahpour. Following the panel inTime music composer and multi-instrumentalist Nacho Arimany treated us to an incredible concert of his original world-music compositions. Why am I sharing this with you now? Well, our friends at Ferro Productions and…
  • Forgive me

    Alex Doman
    15 May 2014 | 3:25 pm
      Forgive me, I can’t contain my excitement! After months of hard work by an amazing group of people today we launched the entirely new Sleep Genius app for iOS. And then the most amazing thing happened… It has been featured as a Best New App in the App Store! Personally, I have to  agree with Apple on that point. Can’t sleep like 25% of your family and friends? Check out the app and tell me what you think! Android users, the new app will be in Google play anytime now. Wearables anyone? Sleep Genius seamlessly integrates with Jawbone Up and Fitbit. Note you’ll…
  • Back At It

    Alex Doman
    13 May 2014 | 11:20 am
    Did you miss me? Perhaps you didn’t notice I was gone… Either way, I wanted to share that I’m back at it! Back at what you ask? Blogging… In November I decided to take a hiatus from writing posts so I could focus with a really awesome team of people to launch two exciting products for Advanced Brain Technologies and Sleep Genius. One of these launched in February. It is a rhythm-based music listening therapy called inTime and I must say it is incredible! I couldn’t be happier about the response to it and the stories I am already hearing about the lives it is…
  • On Hiatus

    Alex Doman
    20 Nov 2013 | 10:55 am
    There are periods in life when you are presented with such abundance of opportunity that you have to make difficult choices about where to spend your time. At the moment this is the case for me. The next 3 months will require my laser sharp focus to launch a significant new program from Advanced Brain Technologies while managing other initiatives through the holidays. For now I must let some things go, including posting to my blog, so this is my official notice that I’m on blogging hiatus. I hope you enjoy the holiday season and look forward to reconnecting with you after the…
  • 7 Tips for the Fall Sleep Transition

    Alex Doman
    29 Oct 2013 | 2:36 pm
    Alex Doman KUTV 2 News interview with anchor Ron Bird Are you ready for the time change? This Sunday, November 3rd at 2:00 am will mark the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST) for most of us in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. This is the time of year that our circadian clock becomes disrupted, similar to jet lag, as your body clocks adjust, resetting to a time one hour earlier than you’ve been used to since DST began in March. Some people find this time change difficult, so KUTV 2News This Morning in Salt Lake City invited me in the studio earlier today to discuss some strategies for…
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    Brain Posts

  • Cognitive Reserve Boosts Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    14 Jul 2014 | 7:44 am
    Cognitive reserve (high educational attainment, high IQ) is known to reduce or delay the risk for Alzheimer's disease.However, the effect of cognitive reserve on recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied.Two recent research studies support the beneficial effects of cognitive reserve on TBI.Schneider and colleagues examined a series of 769 adult TBI subjects using the TBI Model Systems Database.This cohort was followed during rehabilitation for a period of at least one year.The key outcome measure for this study was the Disability Rating Scale score (DFR).Subject…
  • Six Top Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    10 Jul 2014 | 7:38 am
    This month topic is traumatic brain injury (TBI). I have reviewed some recent research manuscript related to the epidemiology and brain imaging issues of TBI.Today I am posting links to clinical trials recently completed in the treatment of TBI. I was surprised at the low number of high-quality clinical trials in TBI. Given the public health burden of TBI, more rigorous randomized controlled trial efforts need to funded.After reviewing about 100 PubMed abstracts, these five stand out to me as important additions to our knowledge base. Clicking on the heading will take you to the…
  • Brain Hippocampus Atrophy in Traumatic Brain Injury

    9 Jul 2014 | 9:06 am
    Understanding the specific brain regions vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for assessment and intervention research.Two areas of active research include studies of brain white matter using diffusion tensor imaging and assessment of regional brain atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Two recent MRI studies have suggested the brain hippocampus may be a region of vulnerability to TBI.A Canadian study by Robin Green and colleagues used brain MRI to examine a cohort of 56 subjects 5 and 20 months following TBI.The majority of subjects in this study sustained their…
  • Millions Lack Level I Trauma Care Access in the U.S.

    8 Jul 2014 | 8:10 am
    Trauma results in 180,000 deaths per year in the U.S. and disproportionately affects children and young adults. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently published a review highlighting unintentional injury and violence as the leading cause of death in the U.S. for those in the one to 30 year old age group. Additionally, trauma produces significant disability through residual effects such as like that often seen following traumatic brain injuryTrauma centers are hospital-affiliated programs coordinating expert treatment of trauma injuries in children and adults. These centers…
  • The Geography of Traumatic Brain Injury Death in U.S.

    7 Jul 2014 | 7:50 am
    In the last post, I examined some recent research in the epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI).Two studies showed the top two causes of TBI to be motor vehicle crashes and falls.In this post, I will review some recent data on the geographic variability of TBI in the United States.The Centers for Disease Control provides an online tool called WISQARS that allows users to search for a variety of statistics related to unintentional injury by state in the U.S.They have recently added a iPad app for WISQARS and so I downloaded the app and ran a state analysis on rates of death by TBI.The…
 
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • Researchers Detect Love and Lust Through Eye Movements

    Google News - Health
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:53 am
    Source: Google News - HealthHave you ever experienced love at first sight? What about lust at first sight? Though these two different emotional and cognitive states are difficult to distinguish from each other, researchers studying eye patterns have found that where your date focuses their eyes on you could reveal whether he or she is romantically or sexually attracted.
  • Smoking During Pregnancy Linked to ADHD Risk in Child

    Google News - Health
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:53 am
    Source: Google News - HealthSmoking during pregnancy can boost ADHD risk in child The Westside Story A new study has linked smoking during pregnancy to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The study, which was led by Lin Liang Zhu of the Research Program for Children's Mental Health at Aarhus University in Denmark, found that ... Smoking while pregnant linked to ADHD in children 13abc Action News all 10 news articles ».
  • "Jews and Arabs Refuse to Be Enemies" Shows Power of Love

    Social Psychology Network News
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:52 am
    Source: Social Psychology Network NewsAmid unrest in the Middle East, some interfaith couples are determined to prove love is stronger than war.
  • Plus-Size Parking Spaces for Women in China Spark Charges of Sexism

    Time Magazine
    19 Jul 2014 | 9:37 am
    Source: Time MagazineMall managers said women had trouble with navigating standard width spots.
  • Obama Will Sign Order Barring Gay, Transgender Discrimination

    L.A. Times - National News
    19 Jul 2014 | 9:36 am
    Source: L.A. Times - National NewsPresident Obama has turned down a plea from religious groups that they be exempt from an executive order he plans to sign Monday prohibiting federal contractors from discriminating against gay or transgender workers, officials said Friday.
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    The Neurocritic

  • The Neurocritic Critiques Critical Neuroscience

    21 Jul 2014 | 2:46 am
    I wanted to submit a paper for the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Research Topic on Critical Neuroscience: The context and implications of human brain research, but I couldn't decide what I should write about.Could I just submit a blog post like Professor of Literary Neuroimaging that critiqued the entrée of fMRI into Literature Departments?“So literature is abandoning Marxism and psychoanalysis in favor of neuroimaging!! Meanwhile, key neuroimagers have taken up psychoanalysis (Carhart-Harris & Friston, 2010) and socialism (Tricomi et al., 2010).”Would they accept short humorous…
  • Scientology Tropes Enter Mainstream Neuroscience?

    13 Jul 2014 | 8:25 pm
    via @mallelisAt the literary/pop culture/feminist/humor blog known as The Toast, the hilarious Mallory Ortberg has skewered those ubiquitous ads from brain training behemoth Lumosity.The Five Stages Of LumosityStage I – Initiation. . .Friend, are you troubled by persistent waking blackouts? Do you tremble and shudder and flicker out of consciousness when asked to recall basic facts about your acquaintances? Does your right eye fill with blood whenever you have to try to remember your PIN? Let Lumosity patch over those mysterious missing blank spots in your sick and addled mind. “Lumosity:…
  • Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

    10 Jul 2014 | 3:58 am
    In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescribed for schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses.The tachykinin receptors (NK1, NK2,…
  • Welcome to Douglas Coupland's Brain

    22 Jun 2014 | 1:36 pm
    A retrospective of an artist's work gives the viewer insight into their creative process over an extended period of time. In some cases, a retrospective seems to allow access into the artist's mind.Canadian artist and writer Douglas Coupland adopted this stance more literally by creating a room filled with 5,000 objects he collected over 20 years and carefully arranged in a masterwork called The Brain. Coupland is best known (to Americans at least) as the author of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, but his prolific artistic output “over the past 12 years addresses the…
  • The Neuroscience of the Future

    16 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?In the utopian world of The Hedonistic Imperative, an ambitious, admirable (and unlikely) 1995 manifesto by philosopher David Pearce, the goal is to “eradicate suffering in all sentient life” through paradise engineering —  which involves sophisticated applications of nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and psychopharmacology. And going beyond the eradication of…
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    The Neurocritic

  • The Neurocritic Critiques Critical Neuroscience

    The Neurocritic
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:46 am
    I wanted to submit a paper for the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Research Topic on Critical Neuroscience: The context and implications of human brain research, but I couldn't decide what I should write about.Could I just submit a blog post like Professor of Literary Neuroimaging that critiqued the entrée of fMRI into Literature Departments?“So literature is abandoning Marxism and psychoanalysis in favor of neuroimaging!! Meanwhile, key neuroimagers have taken up psychoanalysis (Carhart-Harris & Friston, 2010) and socialism (Tricomi et al., 2010).”Would they accept short humorous…
  • Scientology Tropes Enter Mainstream Neuroscience?

    The Neurocritic
    13 Jul 2014 | 8:25 pm
    via @mallelisAt the literary/pop culture/feminist/humor blog known as The Toast, the hilarious Mallory Ortberg has skewered those ubiquitous ads from brain training behemoth Lumosity.The Five Stages Of LumosityStage I – Initiation. . .Friend, are you troubled by persistent waking blackouts? Do you tremble and shudder and flicker out of consciousness when asked to recall basic facts about your acquaintances? Does your right eye fill with blood whenever you have to try to remember your PIN? Let Lumosity patch over those mysterious missing blank spots in your sick and addled mind. “Lumosity:…
  • Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

    The Neurocritic
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:58 am
    In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescribed for schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses.The tachykinin receptors (NK1, NK2,…
  • Welcome to Douglas Coupland's Brain

    The Neurocritic
    22 Jun 2014 | 1:36 pm
    A retrospective of an artist's work gives the viewer insight into their creative process over an extended period of time. In some cases, a retrospective seems to allow access into the artist's mind.Canadian artist and writer Douglas Coupland adopted this stance more literally by creating a room filled with 5,000 objects he collected over 20 years and carefully arranged in a masterwork called The Brain. Coupland is best known (to Americans at least) as the author of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, but his prolific artistic output “over the past 12 years addresses the…
  • The Neuroscience of the Future

    The Neurocritic
    16 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?In the utopian world of The Hedonistic Imperative, an ambitious, admirable (and unlikely) 1995 manifesto by philosopher David Pearce, the goal is to “eradicate suffering in all sentient life” through paradise engineering —  which involves sophisticated applications of nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and psychopharmacology. And going beyond the eradication of…
 
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    Integrative Law Institute

  • Finding Center Among Chaos–an Integrative Law BFOQ

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    17 Jul 2014 | 11:11 am
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession My colleague Jennifer Tull, a collaborative lawyer from Austin, Texas, is blogging about how to keep your center and sense of purpose while working with clients going through major life transitions.  She writes beautifully and epitomizes the journey toward wholeness that is the hallmark of integrative law.    Here is her first post (we’ll be offering others from time to time): Roller Coaster of Joy Finding center among chaos When I was a kid we would sometimes go to AstroWorld, a now-defunct theme park in Houston.
  • Bad Relationships Can Kill You…

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    7 Jun 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession A study released recently found that stressful relationships directly correlate with high blood pressure in women. “What we observed was as the amount of negativity in relationships increased, risk of hypertension [in women] also increased,” reports  Rodlescia Sneed, co-author of the study.  She and  Sheldon Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University,  looked at data from  1,502 healthy adults over 50 contained in a longitudinal study of more than 26,000 Americans…
  • Men and Women: Our Brains Really Are Wired Differently

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    20 Jan 2014 | 1:24 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession Men from Mars, Women from Venus? Does it make you uncomfortable to think that there really are biological differences in the brains of men and women?  Not me; I’ve seen those differences play out over a lifetime in precisely the ways suggested by a new study  published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.        Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered many more neural connections running from the front of the brain to the back…
  • Why Integrative Law Matters for Divorcing Couples: A Conversation With A Psychotherapist

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    15 Nov 2013 | 3:26 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession   Kate Scharff,a  Washington D.C. psychotherapist, wrote this comment after reading a recent article of mine about Neuro-Literacy for Lawyers, published  in Family Lawyer Magazine: Kate Scharff on August 6, 2013 at 2:54 pm said: Pauline: I’m a mental health professional trained in Object Relations Theory (ORT), an outgrowth of classic analytic thinking. ORT holds with the common-sense notion that we are born with the inherent need to be in relationships, and that our early relational patterns form templates for later…
  • Your Tweets Reveal your Psychological Type to Big Business Advertisers

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    11 Nov 2013 | 3:44 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession   Your Social Media Posts May Soon Be  Setting You Up to  Buy More IBM to test people’s psychology through Twitter posts – The Times of India. We are just that much closer to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World with the announcement (first published today in the Times of India’s Social Media blog) that IBM is analyzing Twitter users’ posts to mine information about each writer’s personality typology so that ads can not only be targeted for content and location, but also be framed in terms…
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • Summer school in cognitive sciences 2014 : Web Science and the mind

    Bruno Dubuc
    1 Jul 2014 | 11:54 am
    Every two years, the Cognitive Sciences Institute of the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) holds a summer school on a selected topic in the cognitive sciences. In 2010, the topic was the origin of language, in 2012 it was the evolution and function of consciousness. This summer, from July 7 to 18, 2014, the school will be holding its 5th edition, and the topic will be web science and the mind. The school will be taught and attended by international specialists on the subject of distributed cognition in the brain, between brains, and between brains and computers. The speakers at this…
  • Making the Brain Transparent To Explore It More Easily

    Bruno Dubuc
    16 Jun 2014 | 1:00 pm
    A relatively new technique can now perform the amazing feat of making a mouse’s brain completely transparent (This same technique has been tried on human brains as well, but so far has succeeded in making only parts of them transparent.) But enabling scientists to see through the brain would be merely an interesting curiosity if this technique—dubbed “Clarity” by the team that developed it—did not also preserve the brain’s entire underlying cellular and molecular structure, so that existing methods of staining and tracing nerve bundles can be applied to the brain once it has been…
  • The Variety and Structural Complexity of Neurons

    Bruno Dubuc
    27 May 2014 | 6:53 am
    The purpose of most of the posts in this blog is to summarize recent studies in the cognitive sciences and attempt to make them more accessible—in particular by providing links to selected pages on this website. But the purpose of some of the other posts is simply to draw attention to existing resources on various aspects of neuroscience. Today’s post falls in the latter category. It deals with the neuron and the work by Kristen Harris and her colleagues to reveal it in all its complexity (see the first two links below). Neurons are like any other cells in the human body, except that they…
  • We May Be Able To Have Feelings Without an Insula

    Bruno Dubuc
    12 May 2014 | 2:11 pm
    The insula is a brain structure that lies deep inside the cerebral cortex and so is less accessible for examination. That is why so little was known about the insula for so long, until neurobiologists such as Antonio Damasio demonstrated its role in many human feelings. Because the insula receives so many signals from the strong internal bodily reactions associated with even our slightest emotions, it was seen as perfectly positioned to make us aware of these reactions. That is what Damasio says in a February 2013 article in the journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience, in which he goes on to say…
  • A “cyborg” which hears more than what we see

    Bruno Dubuc
    29 Apr 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Since 2004, Neil Harbisson has regarded himself as the first “cyborg” to be recognized as such by the government of a country—in his case, the United Kingdom, which has given him permission to appear in his passport photo with the small portable camera that he always wears on his forehead. This camera enables him not only to see colours, but also to hear them! Harbisson was born in 1982 with a rare congenital vision disorder called achromatopsia—the inability to see colours. This disorder can also arise following a brain injury, as neurologist Oliver Sacks reported in his…
 
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    Synaesthesia Discovery

  • Synaesthesia Marches into the Soccer World Cup

    Spring
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    The early exit of Australian socceroos at FIFA World Cup 2014 has not dampened the nation’s enthusiasm in soccer. Soccer is on the rise to become more and more popular in Australia. Both Skye and Thomas participate in soccer training and soccer games at school. Before the end of last term, Skye’s team represented his school to compete at a regional tournament. Skye’s interest in soccer was developed through his love of an iPad game called Head Soccer. The game involves players from many countries. His synaesthesia very quickly made him see country flags in synaesthetic…
  • Does Synaesthesia Provide Benefits at a Workplace?

    Spring
    24 Jun 2014 | 6:40 am
    Synaesthesia has been commonly recognised as an asset for musicians and writers, but does synaesthesia provide benefits to ordinary people like myself at a workplace? I have been wondering about this question for a while. My work is hectic. Every day, I rush from one meeting to another. Five to six meetings a day is normal. 5pm is the time that I can finally sit at my desk, and start doing my work without much interruption. In the old days, I used to notice my colleagues taking their notepads to meetings, and writing down meeting notes page after page. I felt embarrassed that I hardly ever…
  • Holograms – Smell to Vision and Vision to Smell Synaesthesia

    Spring
    10 Jun 2014 | 5:27 am
    “Vision is the art of seeing things invisible.” ― Jonathan Swift Synaesthetic vision is holographic like vision, according to Skye. Images are multidimensional which can be seen clearly, but are not touchable. While Skye was learning aboriginal history, he always saw a synaesthetic boomerang going around him. It did distract him a bit as he was too busy looking at the boomerang rather than his classroom teacher. On the weekends, children like coming to our bed after they wake up. The smell of our bed triggers off a lime green colour for Thomas. It makes Skye see fire on the bed like…
  • Does the Imagination Age Make Synaesthesia More Attractive?

    Spring
    23 May 2014 | 6:20 am
    The term “Imagination Age” has captured my attention at a technology conference I attended last two days. Some people believe that the period of economy has gone from the Agricultural Age, to the Industrial Age, to now the Information Age, and is transitioning into the Imagination Age. With so much information readily available, the primary creator of economic value for the next period will be Imagination. I think imagination has been a driving force behind the progression of every period in the human history. By calling the next period the Imagination Age will give more focus on…
  • Synaesthesia A to Z

    Spring
    18 May 2014 | 1:25 am
    “There was no road existed in the world at the beginning, but because there were many people walking on it, it turned into a road…” This was a famous quote by Chinese scholar Lu Xun. Human knowledge in Synaesthesia is like building a road. It started with virtually nothing, then more and more people started noticing and got interested in this field, and more and more knowledge was built. Synaesthesia, through this knowledge building journey, was turned from a description like Disorder or Disease, to Condition, to Phenomenon, and even Gift. This positive change in how…
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    Your Brain Health

  • Are music lessons the key to smarter kids?

    Sarah McKay
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:30 pm
    My 4 year-old son Jamie started piano lessons last year. This might seem a little young, but the classes are designed to make learning music fun. Jamie’s teachers use an unique multi-sensory approach that engages the different senses: auditory, visual and kinaesthetic (movement). The kids learn the notes as: do, re, mi, fa, so, etc, and each note has […]The post Are music lessons the key to smarter kids? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic]

    Sarah McKay
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:36 pm
    › With BIG thanks to EyeWire and Visually.  The post Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience

    Sarah McKay
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Neuroscience seems to offer daily insights into the very core of what it means to be human. But caution is advised. I’m the first to admit its easy to fall into the trap of ‘pop’ neuroscience, neuro-hype, neuro-mania, or ‘mindless neuroscience’. Writing and communicating the complexities and nuances of neuroscience and the brain is hard. There […]The post July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • 7 principles of neuroscience every coach should know

    Sarah McKay
    21 Jun 2014 | 5:51 pm
    Kandel’s Principles of Neuroscience Back in the mid 1990s when I was an undergrad, the core text of my neuroscience curriculum was ‘Principles of Neural Science’ by Eric Kandel, James Schwartz and Thomas Jessell. Eric Kandel went on to win the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on memory storage in […]The post 7 principles of neuroscience every coach should know appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • How to build good habits, make them stick & the awesome power of being boring

    Sarah McKay
    5 Jun 2014 | 2:58 am
    Todays blog post is comes to you from Gregory Ciotti who writes at SparringMind.com where he explores creative work, productivity, habits, and human behaviour. To get his weekly essay on being a little better than you were yesterday, join his free newsletter. And while you’re in sign-up mode and if you want to read MY newsletter, then join […]The post How to build good habits, make them stick & the awesome power of being boring appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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