Neuroscience

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Dietary Prophylaxis Against Diabetes & Heart Disease

    Brain Protips
    brainprotips@gmail.com
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:01 am
    Brain health is intimately linked to heart health and glucose homeostasis (regulation of blood sugar). Brain Health and Cardiovascular Disease The brain is extremely vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chronic hypertension. The most extreme manifestation of this link is hypertensive encephalopathy. High blood pressure causes the cerebral circulation (blood flow in the brain) to […] The post Dietary Prophylaxis Against Diabetes & Heart Disease appeared first on Brain Protips.
  • Microscopic Synapses and Giant Microscopes

    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level
    Bruno Dubuc
    18 Jul 2015 | 8:36 am
    More and more courses are being offered for free online by prestigious universities. Many of these courses deal with various aspects of the cognitive sciences. One such course is “The Fundamentals of Neuroscience”, from Harvard University (see first link below). This course includes various multimedia features, including an excellent 30-minute documentary video entitled “Connectomics: Big Microscopes & Tiny Synapses” (second link below). This video presents the research being done by Professor Jeff Lichtman and his colleagues in his laboratory, who are using images of real human…
  • Over-Active Glutamate Receptor Gene in Females with Depression

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:38 pm
    According to a new study, postmortem brain tissue from females who suffered from depression had abnormally high expression levels of a number of genes which regulate the glutamate system.
  • Potential target for future Huntington's disease treatment discovered

    Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today
    31 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    Scientists have discovered that the way DNA sequences are repaired could be critical to the development of Huntington's disease, potentially offering a target for treatment.
  • Discovery about brain protein causes rethink on development of Alzheimer's disease

    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:37 am
    A protein involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease also has properties that could be helpful for human health, a research study has found. The discovery helps researchers better understand the complicated brain chemistry behind the development of Alzheimer's disease.
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Discovery about brain protein causes rethink on development of Alzheimer's disease

    31 Jul 2015 | 7:37 am
    A protein involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease also has properties that could be helpful for human health, a research study has found. The discovery helps researchers better understand the complicated brain chemistry behind the development of Alzheimer's disease.
  • Depressed females have over-active glutamate receptor gene

    30 Jul 2015 | 2:23 pm
    Numerous genes that regulate the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain have been found to be abundant in brain tissue of depressed females. This could be an underlying cause of the higher incidence of suicide among women, according to research.
  • The body and the brain: Impact of mental, physical exertion on fatigue development

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Do you ever notice how stress and mental frustration can affect your physical abilities? When you are worried about something at work, do you find yourself more exhausted at the end of the day? This phenomenon is a result of the activation of a specific area of the brain when we attempt to participate in both physical and mental tasks simultaneously.
  • Positive reinforcement plays key role in cognitive task performance in ADHD kids

    30 Jul 2015 | 10:12 am
    A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder -- more so than it would for typically developing kids.
  • Take a Trip Through the Brain: New Imaging Tool

    30 Jul 2015 | 10:07 am
    A new imaging tool could do for the brain what the telescope did for space exploration. In the first demonstration of how the technology works, the researchers look inside the brain of an adult mouse at a scale previously unachievable, generating images at a nanoscale resolution. The inventors' goal is to make the resource available to the scientific community in the form of a national brain observatory.
 
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    MIT News - Neuroscience

  • George Adelman, noted neuroscience editor, dies at 89

    David Cohen | Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory
    31 Jul 2015 | 1:37 pm
    George Adelman, noted neuroscience editor, died June 26 due to complications of an injury after a fall. He was 89 years old. Adelman joined MIT in 1963 as the managing editor for the Neurosciences Research Program (NRP), developed by MIT professor of biology Francis Schmitt, bringing together the top scientists in related fields to focus on the new discipline of neuroscience. The new organization, a kind of think tank of resident and visiting scientists, had as its core 36 associates, world-class scientists representing the life sciences as well as physics, mathematics,…
  • MRIs for a more peaceful world

    Liz Karagianis | MIT Spectrum
    9 Jul 2015 | 2:14 pm
    An MRI scanner is an unusual tool for resolving war and conflict, but an MIT collaboration now underway is deploying MRIs as an instrument for peace. The goal of the collaboration — among the Social Cognitive Neuroscience Lab; the Department of Political Science; and Beyond Conflict, an international nongovernmental organization dedicated to global challenges to peace and reconciliation — is to use knowledge of neuroscience to develop innovative, more effective conflict-resolution strategies. Already the groups are putting into practice what they are learning in instances of extreme…
  • Uncovering the mechanism of our oldest anesthetic

    News Office
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Nitrous oxide, commonly known as “laughing gas,” has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood. In a study published this week in Clinical Neurophysiology, MIT researchers reveal some key brainwave changes among patients receiving the drug. For a period of about three minutes after the administration of nitrous oxide at anesthetic doses, electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings show large-amplitude slow-delta waves, a powerful pattern of electrical firing that sweeps across the front of the brain as slowly as…
  • Uncovering a dynamic cortex

    Rob Matheson | MIT News Office
    18 Jun 2015 | 10:59 am
    Researchers at MIT have proven that the brain’s cortex doesn’t process specific tasks in highly specialized modules — showing that the cortex is, in fact, quite dynamic when sharing information. Previous studies of the brain have depicted the cortex as a patchwork of function-specific regions. Parts of the visual cortex at the back of the brain, for instance, encode color and motion, while specific frontal and middle regions control more complex functions, such as decision-making. Neuroscientists have long criticized this view as too compartmentalized. In a paper published today in…
  • Recalling happier memories can reverse depression

    Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
    17 Jun 2015 | 9:59 am
    MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can cure the symptoms of depression in mice by artificially reactivating happy memories that were formed before the onset of depression. The findings, described in the June 18 issue of Nature, offer a possible explanation for the success of psychotherapies in which depression patients are encouraged to recall pleasant experiences. They also suggest new ways to treat depression by manipulating the brain cells where memories are stored. The researchers believe this kind of targeted approach could have fewer side effects than most existing antidepressant…
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Bill Nye Reading Mean Tweets [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    1 Aug 2015 | 10:28 am
  • Comments of the Week #70: From the ultimate darkness to variable stars [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    1 Aug 2015 | 7:34 am
    “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.” -Neil Armstrong This past week saw a whole lot of interesting things happen, including tonight’s second full moon of the month: a rare blue moon. In my life, I saw the International Space Station for the first time, but here at Starts With A Bang, there was so much to learn about and share, including: When will the stars go dark? (for Ask Ethan), Advertising vs. art (for…
  • Years after Superstorm Sandy, residents still struggle with stress, recovery efforts [The Pump Handle]

    Kim Krisberg
    31 Jul 2015 | 4:50 pm
    Superstorm Sandy came ashore nearly three years ago, pummeling the New England and Mid-Atlantic coast and becoming one of the deadliest and costliest storms to ever hit the U.S. This week, the Sandy Child and Family Health Study released two new reports finding that the health impacts of Sandy continue to linger, illustrating the deep mental footprint left by catastrophic disasters and the challenges of long-term recovery. Led by researchers at Rutgers University and New York University, the Sandy Child and Family Health Study is based on 1,000 face-to-face interviews with adults in the nine…
  • Ask Ethan #99: How do we know the age of the Universe? (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:06 pm
    “Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.” –Stanislaw Jerzy Lec You’ve heard it said many times here: the Universe, since the Big Bang, is 13.8 billion years old. But how do we know this to be true? Image credit: Bock et al. (2006, astro-ph/0604101); modifications by me. Moreover, how many different lines of evidence do we have that leads us to this conclusion? Is it like it is for dark matter, where we have a whole slew of them? Or are there only one or two different things we can look at in order to know? Image credit: Joel D. Hartman, Princeton University,…
  • A portrait of quackademia triumphant: Georgetown University [Respectful Insolence]

    Orac
    31 Jul 2015 | 6:40 am
    I frequently discuss a disturbing phenomenon known as “quackademic medicine.” Basically, quackademic medicine is a phenomenon that has taken hold over the last two decades in medical academia in which once ostensibly science-based medical schools and academic medical centers embrace quackery. This embrace was once called “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM) but among quackademics the preferred term is now “integrative medicine.” Of course, when looked at objectively, integrative medicine is far more a brand than a specialty. Specifically,…
 
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    Deric's MindBlog

  • Unlearning social biases during sleep

    31 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    Feld and Born note that tenacious implicit prejudices of race or gender drive discrimination seen in the rise of nationalistic groups, excessive police violence against minority group members, persisting unequal pay for women, and sexual harassment all across the developed world. They point to work by Hu et al. that shows how such unwanted attitudes may be persistently changed by a social counterbias training when the fresh memories of this training are systematically reactivated during sleep after training. Here is part of their summary: Sleep, and specifically deep or slow-wave sleep…
  • The danger of artificial intelligence is artificial stupidity.

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    Here are some clips from an interesting Op-Ed piece by Quentin Hardy on artificial intelligence. (And, by the way, a recent issue of Science Magazine has a special section on A.I. with a series of related articles.): ...the real worry...is a computer program rapidly overdoing a single task, with no context. A machine that makes paper clips proceeds unfettered, one example goes, and becomes so proficient that overnight we are drowning in paper clips. There is little sense among practitioners in the field of artificial intelligence that machines are anywhere close to acquiring the kind of…
  • Placebo analgesia reduces empathy for pain.

    29 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    Fascinating observations from Rütgen et al.. They show that experimental modulation of a first-hand emotion experience also modulates empathy for that emotion experience. This confirms that overlapping neural circuitry for a representation of another's emotion is specifically grounded in neural mechanisms that are also subserving the corresponding first-hand emotion experience, as opposed to unspecific or domain-general neural processes associated with emotion experiences: Previous research in social neuroscience has consistently shown that empathy for pain recruits brain areas that are also…
  • Dopamine and subjective well-being

    28 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    Dolan and collaborators note influences of dopamine on emotion and decision making that are distinct from its known role in learning.: The neuromodulator dopamine has a well established role in reporting appetitive prediction errors that are widely considered in terms of learning. However, across a wide variety of contexts, both phasic and tonic aspects of dopamine are likely to exert more immediate effects that have been less well characterized. Of particular interest is dopamine's influence on economic risk taking and on subjective well-being, a quantity known to be substantially affected…
  • Brain markers of individual differences in human prosociality.

    27 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    Sul et al. make the fascinating observation that self-regarding and other-regarding regions of the medial prefrontal cortex show greater segregation in selfish individuals and more overlap in prosocial individuals. Despite the importance of valuing another person’s welfare for prosocial behavior, currently we have only a limited understanding of how these values are represented in the brain and, more importantly, how they give rise to individual variability in prosociality. In the present study, participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a prosocial…
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    Brain Blogger

  • Novel Breakthroughs in Parkinson’s Disease Treatment

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    Around 7 million people around the world are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease every year. This is a progressively degenerative disease that has no cure. There have been, however, a number of very encouraging findings published in the last few weeks, some of which are briefly reviewed in this article. Drugs to manage the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are available, but they become ineffective after the patient has taken them for a few years. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure for patients in the advanced stages of the disease. It involves implanting electrodes in the…
  • Tell Me Sweet Little Lies

    Jennifer Gibson, PharmD
    27 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    We all know that telling lies is wrong. But, we still do it. Now, some researchers think that lying may not be all bad. New reports claim that children who tell lies have better memory than those who don’t. In an experiment designed to tempt kids to cheat, researchers invited 114 children to a lab to play a trivia game. The 6- and 7-year-old children were asked if they had, in fact, cheated and they were asked about the details of their lie. Separately, the same children underwent tests of verbal and spatial working memory. In the end, the children who lied had better verbal memory…
  • Practice Being Grateful and Reap the Benefits

    Carla Clark, PhD
    26 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    The benefits of gratitude are many and profound. Being grateful is shown to improve both physical and mental health, psychological wellbeing and attitude, and our relationships with others. Practicing gratitude has even been shown to rewire our brains for the better—it is a truly powerful life-changing tool. Reducing physiological stress and improving sleep Just this year, one study reports that a short, two-week daily gratitude writing intervention completed by 119 women that were either working or studying at University College London increased the women’s perceived wellbeing. The…
  • Our Mental Abilities Are Not Entirely Exceptional

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    25 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    We rightfully consider ourselves the smartest species on Earth. Our smartness, however, is not entirely unique. Our mental abilities have not suddenly appeared from nowhere – they must have gradually evolved. So it does not come as a really big surprise to find out that many animals possess certain mental abilities that we traditionally considered uniquely human. Scientists had been probing into the mental abilities of birds and animals for many years. Now we are certain that we share neuronal abilities – especially those related to language and communication – with animals.
  • Fittening App

    Lorena Nessi, PhD, MA
    24 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    It is well established that regulations in the weight loss industry are slack enough to allow potential harm to consumers, and many advocate for the government to strengthen existing laws. The vested interests in the market are a serious concern, with the weight loss industry in the US alone generating around $60.5 billion in revenue across 2014, according to Marketdata Enterprises. One might imagine that the wealth of information now online might help individuals to become more informed, but in such an unregulated industry the abundance of both crafted and ignorant misinformation available…
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    Mind Hacks

  • Laughter as a window on the infant mind

    tomstafford
    31 Jul 2015 | 1:25 am
    What makes a baby laugh? The answer might reveal a lot about the making of our minds, says Tom Stafford. What makes babies laugh? It sounds like one of the most fun questions a researcher could investigate, but there’s a serious scientific reason why Caspar Addyman wants to find out. He’s not the first to ask this question. Darwin studied laughter in his infant son, and Freud formed a theory that our tendency to laugh originates in a sense of superiority. So we take pleasure at seeing another’s suffering – slapstick style pratfalls and accidents being good examples –…
  • Spike activity 24-07-2015

    vaughanbell
    26 Jul 2015 | 2:36 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Why does the concept of ‘schizophrenia’ still persist? Great post from Psychodiagnosticator. Nature reviews two new movies on notorious psychology experiments: the Stanford Prison Experiment and Milgram’s conformity experiments. Can the thought of money make people more conservative? Another social priming effect bites the dust Neuroskeptic with a great analysis. The Psychologist has a transcript of a recent ‘teenagers debunked’ talk at the Latitude Festival. Oliver Sack’s excellent biography On The…
  • Are online experiment participants paying attention?

    tomstafford
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:51 pm
    Online testing is sure to play a large part in the future of Psychology. Using Mechanical Turk or other crowdsourcing sites for research, psychologists can quickly and easily gather data for any study where the responses can be provided online. One concern, however, is that online samples may be less motivated to pay attention to the tasks they are participating in. Not only is nobody watching how they do these online experiments, they whole experience is framed as a work-for-cash gig, so there is pressure to complete any activity as quickly and with as low effort as possible. To the extent…
  • Conspiracy theory as character flaw

    tomstafford
    21 Jul 2015 | 2:24 am
    Philosophy professor Quassim Cassam has a piece in Aeon arguing that conspiracy theorists should be understood in terms of the intellectual vices. It is a dead-end, he says, to try to understand the reasons someone gives for believing a conspiracy theory. Consider someone called Oliver who believes that 9/11 was an inside job: Usually, when philosophers try to explain why someone believes things (weird or otherwise), they focus on that person’s reasons rather than their character traits. On this view, the way to explain why Oliver believes that 9/11 was an inside job is to identify his…
  • Spike activity 13-07-2015

    vaughanbell
    13 Jul 2015 | 1:32 pm
    A slightly belated Spike Activity to capture some of the responses to the APA report plus quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: APA makes a non-apology on Twitter and gets panned in response. “the organization’s long-standing ethics director, Stephen Behnke, had been removed from his position as a result of the report and signaled that other firings or sanctions could follow” according to the Washington Post. Psychologist accused of enabling US torture backed by former FBI chief, reports The Guardian. The wrangling begins. PsychCentral editor John Grohol resigns…
 
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • "Race and the Law in the Genomic Age: A Problem for Equal Treatment Under the Law"

    NELB Staff
    1 Aug 2015 | 8:45 am
    Recently published in SSRN (and forthcoming in The Oxford Handbook on Law and Technology): "Race and the Law in the Genomic Age: A Problem for Equal Treatment Under the Law" ROBIN BRADLEY KAR, University of Illinois College of Law JOHN...
  • "No Pain, No Gain: How 'Objective' is Neuroimaging for Women and Minorities?"

    NELB Staff
    26 Jul 2015 | 8:06 pm
    Recently published in SSRN (and forthcoming the Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy): "No Pain, No Gain: How 'Objective' is Neuroimaging for Women and Minorities?" SEEMA MOHAPATRA, Barry University - Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law Approximately 100 million...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    24 Jul 2015 | 8:03 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist, The Atlantic In The Popular Press: Brain Area Found That May Make Humans Unique, Nature News The Desserts Looked Delicious. Then Scientists Rewired Their Brains To Stifle Temptation., Washington Post...
  • "Legal Indeterminacy in the Spoken Word"

    NELB Staff
    22 Jul 2015 | 5:42 pm
    Recently published in SSRN (and Brooklyn Law School Legal Studies Paper No. 418): "Legal Indeterminacy in the Spoken Word" LAWRENCE M. SOLAN, Brooklyn Law School SILVIA DAHMEN, University of Cologne A great deal is written about difficulties in construing legal...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    20 Jul 2015 | 6:42 am
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Screen Addiction Is Taking a Toll on Children, New York Times In The Popular Press: The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist, The Atlantic Naps May Improve Our Frustration Tolerance, New York Times: Well Blog Screaming For...
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    Neuromarketing

  • How the TMI Effect Cuts Your Sales, and 4 Ways to Avoid It

    Liraz Margalit
    30 Jul 2015 | 5:10 am
    Split testing shows too much product information can actually reduce sales - here are four ways to avoid the TMI Effect.
  • How To Use Positive Framing to Persuade and Sell

    Roger Dooley
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:18 am
    Both apes and humans prefer positive framing. Learn how to use that innate bias to sell more effectively.
  • Get Smarter Instantly With This Fishy Technique

    Roger Dooley
    15 Jul 2015 | 11:04 am
    Can inhaling a few times make you far more likely to spot erroneous statements? A new study says "yes."
  • Print vs. Digital: Another Emotional Win for Paper

    Roger Dooley
    8 Jul 2015 | 5:42 am
    Every year, consumers spend more time using digital devices. Every year, more media is consumed digitally. Naturally, advertising dollars are increasingly flowing to digital as well. But, don’t pull the plug on that direct mail campaign just yet. New research [...]
  • Your Brain on Porsche: Neuro-Nonsense

    Roger Dooley
    29 Jun 2015 | 6:11 am
    The last few months have been mostly good news for neuromarketers. From major university research to corporate investment, credibility is on the rise. But, completely dismissing the sketchy science perception won’t be possible as long as people use and abuse [...]
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • "How Do you Feel?" with Dr. Bud Craig

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    28 Jul 2015 | 1:00 am
    AD (Bud) Craig (click photo to play interview) Dr. AD (Bud) Craig has spent his career as a functional neuroanatomist tracing the path of the interoceptive (homeostatic) signals from both the skin and deep tissues to the insular cortex. After over 30 years in the field he has published a comprehensive description of his work called  How Do You Feel?: An Interoceptive Moment with Your Neurobiological Self. In BSP 121 we talk about some of his key discoveries. Although the book is must-read for students and scientists, the goal of our discussion was to make this material accessible to…
  • More on CI Therapy with Ed Taub (BSP 120)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:25 pm
    Ed Taub, PhD: Click image to play interview I have just posted the second half of my recent interview with Dr. Ed Taub the pioneer of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CI Therapy), which is a revolutionary approach to rehabilitation for stroke and other central nervous system injuries. In BSP 119 Dr. Taub explained the principles behind CI Therapy, which is probably the first rehab technique that explicitly harnesses brain plasticity. In BSP 120 we explore the crucial role of learned non-use (lose it or lose it) and how CI Therapy overcomes this obstacle to recovery.We also talked about…
  • Dr. Ed Taub revolutionizes Stroke Rehab (BSP 119)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    25 May 2015 | 2:51 pm
    Ginger Campbell, Md and Edward Taub, Phd (click image to play audio) I first talked with with Dr. Edward Taub the inventor of Constraint Induced (CI) Movement Therapy back in early 2008 (BSP 28). CI Therapy is a revolutionary rehabilitation method based on the principles of brain plasticity. Evidence supporting its effectiveness has mounted since we last talked. Unfortunately, because it is so different from traditional physical therapy, it requires special training and it is still not covered by many major insurance companies. The Veteran's Administration recognizes it as the preferred…
  • Brain Anatomy Revealed (BSP 118)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    28 Apr 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Episode 118 of the Brain Science Podcast gives listeners a worldwind tour of neuroanatomy based on Beyond the Zonules of Zinn: A Fantastic Journey Through Your Brain (2008) by David Bainbridge. The book is a wonderful introduction to brain anatomy that makes this challenging topic accessible to people of all backgrounds. If you are new to neuroanatomy it will give you a new appreciation of how the brain's structure helps us understand how it works. More experienced readers/listeners will enjoy this well-organized review that puts brain anatomy into its evolutionary context. How to get…
  • BSP 117: Michael Gazzaniga "Father"of Cognitive Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    Dr. Michael Gazzinga (click photo to listen to his interview) Pioneering neuroscientist Dr. Michael Gazzaniga has written many wonderful books that share neuroscience with a general audience. In his latest book Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience he looks back on his 50+ year career from a uniquely personally vantage point. He shares the people and collaborations that have enriched his life and when I interviewed him for BSP 117  he said “My pitch to the young person is that there is nothing on this planet that compares to the pleasures of…
 
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    Neuronarrative

  • The Curious Connection Between Distraction and Impulsivity

    David DiSalvo
    1 Aug 2015 | 10:38 am
    Science is steadily uncovering a link between handicapped working memory resources and handicapped impulse control, with all its unfortunate shortcomings.
  • Why Jobs That Make You Think Are Good Brain Medicine

    David DiSalvo
    28 Jun 2015 | 12:09 pm
    Adding to an already robust catalog of research showing that thinking-related challenges are like exercise for the brain, the latest study shows that jobs involving high levels of “executive, verbal and fluid” tasks enhance memory and thinking abilities for years to come.
  • Your Brain Never Stops Playing the Confidence Game

    David DiSalvo
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:39 pm
    We seem to be equipped with a way to detect the level of confidence embedded in others’ voices, and even a loud tone—if lacking the confidence intangible—isn’t likely to cause much more than irritation.
  • Simple Life Hacks to Lose Weight and Improve Your Health

    David DiSalvo
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:51 pm
    Much of the self-improvement industry is focused on ways to cattle prod our willpower into healthier habits. Behavioral psychologists, on the other hand, have conducted a wealth of research showing that skillful hacks to our homes and offices can produce results that tweaks to willpower, however forceful, rarely make stick.
  • Why Stress Can Make You Do Some Unusual Things

    David DiSalvo
    7 Feb 2015 | 11:36 am
    Researchers have shown that not only does stress predispose us to wanting pleasure, it makes our desire for it drastically out of proportion to our enjoyment. The reward never reaches the level of our want.
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • GMOs and Making Up Your Own Science

    Steven Novella
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:03 am
    Dedicated anti-science groups engage in a number of methods to maintain their propaganda upstream against the scientific evidence. It’s actually not difficult- people are generally very good at motivated reasoning. We can demonize or lionize anything. Methods include dismissing scientific studies whose conclusions you don’t like, supporting low quality studies you do like, misinterpreting and distorting other studies, and of course cherry picking. Sometimes, however, dedicated activists seem to literally make up studies out of whole cloth, or ideological scientists perform dubious…
  • Big Data and Personalized Medicine

    Steven Novella
    30 Jul 2015 | 4:39 am
    Jun Wang, a famous Chinese geneticist, announced that he is going to shift his career into developing an AI (artificial intelligence) system that correlates genetics, behavior, and environmental factors with personal health. The goal is to provide individual recommendations about health and lifestyle based upon those factors. In this case AI does not refer necessarily to a self-aware computer but just an intelligent system, like the AI that determines the behavior of characters in video games, or that won Jeopardy against human champions. The real centerpiece of Wang’s vision is the…
  • Despite Headlines, the EM Drive Is Still Bullshit

    Steven Novella
    29 Jul 2015 | 7:58 am
    Headlines declare, “To the Moon in Four Hours,” and “Star Trek Impulse Drive,” even from mainstream outlets like the Telegraph. This is an old story that will likely rear its head for years to come. It’s the free energy of space travel. The allure is simply too great for the cranks to ignore. At issue is the EM Drive, which I wrote about here. The makers of the drive claim that it produces thrust without propellant. Physicists say that such a thing would violate the law of conservation of momemntum. Devices that claim to break a well-established law of physics…
  • Anecdotes and Cannabis Oil

    Steven Novella
    28 Jul 2015 | 4:59 am
    An article making the rounds has this claim in the headline: This Man Was Given 18 Months To Live. Here’s How He Illegally Cured His Cancer. The article further explains that he “cured” his cancer with cannabis oil. This is highly misleading for multiple reasons. This and other articles tell the story of David Hibbit, a 32 year old man who was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2012. First, let me say that of course I wish nothing but the best for Mr. Hibbit. I hope his cancer is completely gone and he lives a long life with his family. Cancer is a serious and scary disease. It has…
  • Artificially Selected Organisms

    Steven Novella
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:15 am
    A new petition to Whitehouse.gov demands mandatory labeling for all “artificially selected organisms.” The petition says: ASO plants or animals have had their genetic makeup altered to exhibit traits that are not naturally theirs. Artificial selection (or selective breeding) involves the selection of traits that are beneficial to humans, not what helps the organism survive in nature. And concludes: 80% of Americans support mandatory labels on food containing DNA. That last bit is true. A survey performed by Oklahoma State University Department of Agricultural Economics found that…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • By Way of Introduction

    Richard Kollmar
    1 Aug 2015 | 1:53 pm
    This is a blog about the (mostly Buddhist) methods of self-examination and self-management that are collectively known as [mental or spiritual] cultivation (bhavanā). The title, “Mindfields,” suggested to me the several vantage points from which consciousness can attempt to view itself, and the variety of maps of the territory that can be drawn from the perspectives of religious tradition, cognitive psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience respectively. The word is attractive also because of its similarity to “minefields.” Any investigation of the related topics of mind, self, and…
  • Is there a Cure for Alzhiemer’s? - Bang Goes The...

    scientiflix
    1 Aug 2015 | 12:46 pm
    Is there a Cure for Alzhiemer’s? – Bang Goes The Theory After looking at some of the terrifying stats, Terry Wogan looks into future treatments to preventing Alzhiemer’s. By: Brit Lab.
  • Can Yoga Treat Depression or Anxiety?

    Scott L Costello
    1 Aug 2015 | 10:40 am
    Yoga continues to increase in popularity and many claim that Yoga can treat clinical depression or anxiety, but, are these claims true? Listen to the answer to this question, at The Mental Health Review podcast. With Scott Costello, LCSW, author of The Mental Health Review, hosted by Mark Paye, MA. https://thementalhealthreview.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/tmhrpodcastep1.mp3
  • Where Do Nightmares Come From? Nightmares can be extremely...

    scientiflix
    1 Aug 2015 | 10:01 am
    Where Do Nightmares Come From? Nightmares can be extremely distressful to have but they actually may be helping you to deal with issues in your life that may be causing you actual stress in your waking life. By: TestTube Plus.
  • psych2go: 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking (Cognitive...

    scientiflix
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:16 am
    psych2go: 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking (Cognitive Distortions) 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking (Cognitive Distortions) Ashleigh’s going through the 15 common styles of distorted thinking, also known as cognitive distortions! Based on a post by Neurolove – 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking Sources: Cognition Psychology Tools: What are Cognitive Distortions? Cognitive distortion 15 Common Cognitive Distortions By: Psych2Go.Support Ashleigh’s Indiegogo campaign for a new camera
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    Alex Doman

  • Can Structure and Creativity Coexist?

    Alex Doman
    30 Jul 2015 | 9:54 am
    Innovation surrounds us, and we can each be engaged in creative expression within organizations, bolstered by rather than being crushed by structure and systems. Being given the freedom to ideate, try new ideas, and fail within a safe and flexible system fosters an environment built for innovation. People will unleash their creativity when empowered to do so. Can structure and creativity coexist? Workfront asked me and 10 marketing thought leaders this question.  See what I say…  Can Structure and Creativity Coexist? And, check out Chris Brogan, Rachel Herrscher, Ted Rubin and the…
  • Music Does Profound Things to Your Brain

    Alex Doman
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:35 am
    My friend Max Lugavere joined us in Utah this past weekend to speak about brain health and his film BREADHEAD at The Listening Program® Conference 2015. We had a few minutes to film a quick chat about the power of music to change your brain. In the interview I introduce Max to inTime and our Waves multisensory headphone system where he experiences bone conducted listening for the first time. I loved his reaction! And be sure to listen to podcast we did on The Listening Program Radio & Podcast a while back.Filed under: Interviews Tagged: Alex Doman, bone conduction, brain, headphones,…
  • Bloom, Brain-Based Parenting

    Alex Doman
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:48 am
    I’ve come to know some truly exceptional people via social media over the years and Dr. Lynne Kenney is one of the stand outs. A mother of two, practicing pediatric psychologist, and the author of The  Family Coach Method, Dr.Kenney has just published the first multi-media book on parenting. Taking its lead from neuroscience and best practices in early childhood mental health, Bloom, the latest book from Dr. Lynne Kenney and Wendy Young offers parents, teachers and care providers the words, thoughts and actions to raise calm, confident children, while reducing the need for consequences…
  • Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain- For Life

    Alex Doman
    5 May 2015 | 9:26 am
    Debilitating brain disorders are on the rise-from children diagnosed with autism and ADHD to adults developing dementia at younger ages than ever before. But a medical revolution is underway that can solve this problem: Astonishing new research is revealing that the health of your brain is, to an extraordinary degree, dictated by the state of your microbiome – the vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your own cells ten to one. What’s taking place in your intestines today is determining your risk for any number of brain-related conditions. In his latest…
  • Autism: Identifying the Biochemical Fingerprint

    Alex Doman
    31 Mar 2015 | 11:13 am
      A few years back I was introduced to a physician by a mutual friend, Kristin Selby Gonzales. Kristin is mom to Jaxson who is diagnosed with autism, and Chairman of Autism Hope Alliance , a non-profit doing great work in the field, and whose advisory board I proudly serve on. The three of us shared a panel discussion on autism treatment and recovery at the Natural Product Expo West. That doctor was Dan Rossignol, MD, FAAFP, FMAP. After hearing his personal story as a father with two children with autism, who switched from a family medical practice to biomedical research and treatment to…
 
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    Brain Posts

  • Mediterranean Diet and Alzheimer's Disease Prevention

    21 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    There is an urgent need to identify strategies to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.The role of diet as a prevention strategy is controversial. Some research evidence supports a role for a Mediterranean diet in cognitive health and dementia prevention.A recent brain imaging study adds to this evidence. Dr. Lisa Mosconi and colleagues at New York University School of Medicine completed a cross-sectional study of brain magnetic resonance imaging and diet was completed in 52 older cognitively normal individuals.The key elements of the design of this…
  • Fitness Linked to Brain White Matter Integrity in Aging

    15 Jul 2015 | 9:32 am
    Cardiovascular fitness has been correlated with a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and cognition.These correlations have not proven causality but they do support continued imaging and brain function studies.Scott Hayes from the VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston School of Medicine recently published an information study on this topic.Brain white matter integrity is now open for study using diffusion tensor imaging, available from high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).In the current study, the research team used the following key elements in their study…
  • Alzheimer's Disease: The Promise of Diabetes Drugs

    13 Jul 2015 | 9:27 am
    Current pharmacologic interventions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have limited effectiveness.Most of the current AD drugs available promise to slow the rate of progression but fail to reverse or prevent the disease.Novel strategies for AD drug treatment are desperately needed and one promising class of agents are the newer drugs for treatment of diabetes. How might a diabetes treatment drug potentially treat a brain disease like AD?A recent review article in World Journal of Diabetes summarizes what is known about the neuroprotective effect of the anti-diabetic drug liraglutide (trade name…
  • Brain Posts Hits 3 Million Pageviews

    9 Jul 2015 | 7:35 am
    Dear Brain Posts Reader:This week has been a fireworks experience for me as Brain Posts passed the 3 million pageview mark.I started the blog in 2009 and have posted 676 posts over the last six years.I started the blog primarily as a note-taking forum for my scientific reading. I select neuroscience research I feel is noteworthy and important from PubMed. Selecting a single study for more detailed notes has been a helpful focus and memory tool.Over 400,000 Brain Posts pageviews have come via the research blogging aggregation website ResearchBlogging.org. They have a very helpful tool for…
  • Brain Imaging and Alzheimer's Disease Prediction

    8 Jul 2015 | 9:54 am
    Enhanced early detection of risk for Alzheimer's dementia and other forms of dementia is key to prevention and early intervention.Brain imaging holds promise as a pre-clinical disease risk assessment tool in Alzeimer's dementia.Dementia risk has been linked to several brain imaging abnormalities found with magnetic resonance imaging. These abnormalities have included atrophy of the brain hippocampus, medial temporal lobe as well as white matter hyperintensities.A recent study from France examined whether brain MRI findings can improve Alzheimer's and other dementia prediction over…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • Obama in Kenya: Female Genital Mutilation Is Indefensible

    Social Psychology Network News
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:44 am
    Source: Social Psychology Network NewsAs the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya, Barack Obama used the opportunity to call out the country for practices that harm women and girls. “There’s no excuse for sexual assault or domestic violence, there’s no reason that young girls should suffer genital mutilation, there’s no place in a civilised society for the early or forced marriage of children. These traditions may go back centuries; they have no place in the 21st century.”
  • Illuminating Mechanisms of Repetitive Thinking

    ScienceDaily
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:43 am
    Source: ScienceDailyThe ability to engage in mental time travel is a unique and central part of the human experience. And yet this very ability can have detrimental consequences for both physical and mental well-being when it becomes repetitive and uncontrolled. New research investigates this kind of repetitive thinking, exploring the core psychological processes that underlie maladaptive thought processes like worry and rumination.
  • ​Google Reveals How It Crams a Neural Network into Your Smart Phone

    Yahoo News - Business
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:43 am
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessGoogle has developed a miniature neural network so that its Translate app can do live translations without being connected to the internet.
  • How Do Body Cameras Affect Police Officers?

    Yahoo News - Health
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:43 am
    Source: Yahoo News - HealthBody camera footage made headlines again this week after Officer Ray Tensing was indicited for murder after he allegedly shot a man in the head during a traffic stop. Michael Broder, a therapist who worked with the Philadelphia police department for five years providing psychological counseling, said the big question among experts is if the body cameras will make police afraid to act or if they will just not act inappropriately. There are not...
  • Dentist Who Killed Popular Lion Faces Online Shaming

    Time Magazine
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:42 am
    Source: Time MagazineWhat the online hate directed at a U.S. dentist, who shot and killed a lion in Zimbabwe, says about us.
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    The Neurocritic

  • Scary Brains and the Garden of Earthly Deep Dreams

    19 Jul 2015 | 2:38 pm
    In case you've been living under a rock the past few weeks, Google's foray into artificial neural networks has yielded hundreds of thousands of phantasmagoric images. The company has an obvious interest in image classification, and here's how they explain the DeepDream process in their Research Blog:Inceptionism: Going Deeper into Neural Networks . . .We train an artificial neural network by showing it millions of training examples [of dogs and eyes and pagodas, let's say] and gradually adjusting the network parameters until it gives the classifications we want. The network typically consists…
  • Can Tetris Reduce Intrusive Memories of a Trauma Film?

    14 Jul 2015 | 5:23 pm
    For some inexplicable reason, you watched the torture gore horror film Hostel over the weekend. On Monday, you're having trouble concentrating at work. Images of severed limbs and bludgeoned heads keep intruding on your attempts to code or write a paper. So you decide to read about the making of Hostel.You end up seeing pictures of the most horrifying scenes from the movie. It's all way too way much to simply shake off so then you decide to play Tetris. But a funny thing happens. The unwelcome images start to become less frequent. By Friday, the gory mental snapshots are no longer forcing…
  • Who Will Pay for All the New DBS Implants?

    27 Jun 2015 | 11:47 pm
    Recently, Science and Nature had news features on big BRAIN funding for the development of deep brain stimulation technologies. The ultimate aim of this research is to treat and correct malfunctioning neural circuits in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Both pieces raised ethical issues, focused on device manufacturers and potential military applications, respectively.A different ethical concern, not mentioned in either article, is who will have access to these new devices, and who is going to pay the medical costs once they hit the market. DBS for movement disorders is a test case,…
  • The Future of Depression Treatment

    21 Jun 2015 | 2:53 am
    2014Jessica is depressed again. After six straight weeks of overtime, her boss blandly praised her teamwork at the product launch party. And the following week she was passed over for a promotion in favor of Jason, her junior co-worker. "It's always that way, I'll never get ahead..." She arrives at her therapist's office late, looking stressed, disheveled, and dejected. The same old feelings of worthlessness and despair prompted her to resume her medication and CBT routine."You deserve to be recognized for your work," said Dr. Harrison. "The things you're telling yourself right now are…
  • 8 1/2 Reward Prediction Errors: #MovieDirectorNeuroscientistMashup

    14 Jun 2015 | 8:57 pm
    Fellini/Schultz: 8½ Reward Prediction ErrorsOn Twitter, movie/brain buff My Cousin Amygdala issued the #MovieDirectorNeuroscientistMashup challenge using the following selections:I made a few movie posters to go along with my suggestions...Kurosawa/Tonegawa: Rashomon and the Memory EngramDavid Lynch/Eric Kandel: Blue Velvet AplysiaWrite-in nominations were allowed, too.@CousinAmygdala or an action movie by Woo/Kanwisher: 'Fusiform Face Off'— rogier kievit (@rogierK) June 14, 2015@CousinAmygdala Write-in: Scorsese / Eleanor Maguire - Taxi Driver's Hippocampus— Mariam Aly (@mariam_s_aly)…
 
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    The Beautiful Brain

  • A Review of Inside Out

    Ben Ehrlich
    19 Jul 2015 | 8:01 am
    via Forbes The Los Angeles Review of Books has a terrific short review of the new Pixar film Inside Out by Yale Professor of English and American Studies Wai Chee Dimock. Dimock points out that although the film employs the “greatest hits of mind theory,” according to the producer, it leaves thinking out. Berkeley professor of psychology Dacher Keltner, who was consulted on the film, argues that emotions are important for our evolution. The film tries to leave us with empathy for the confusion and anxiety within our own heads and the heads of others, that which thought can…
  • The Science Delusion

    Ben Ehrlich
    11 Jul 2015 | 5:11 am
    Tricycle Magazine: The Buddhist Review offers wisdom, meditation, and practices from an ancient tradition for contemporary life. In Spring 2014, it featured an interview with the cultural critic Curtis White, whose book The Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers, a follow-up to his 2003 international bestseller The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don’t Think For Themselves, attacks the ideology of scientism, or “the claim that science has got the world nailed down (or soon will, anyway), that the answer to all of our human problems lies in the…
  • Neuroscience in Photography

    Ben Ehrlich
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:53 pm
    “Empire Falling.” Copyright Elena Dorfman. Over at Nautilus, there is a long piece by Jonathon Keats titled “When Photographers are Neuroscientists.” Keats, the experimental philosopher and conceptual artist, author of the book Forged: Why the Fakes are the Great Art of Our Age, tells the story of the photographers Elena Dorfman, David Hockney, and Weegee, whose work illustrates contradiction and uncertainty in how the brain handles visual information. Citing an influential 2004 neuroaesthetics paper by Semir Zeki, which defines the experience of ambiguity in the…
  • Brain Science Podcast

    Ben Ehrlich
    1 Jul 2015 | 3:06 am
    Waking, Dreaming, Being. Columbia University Press, 2015                       The Brain Science Podcast is a great resource for conversations about philosophy of mind. Recently, I listened to a podcast with Evan Thompson, whose book Waking, Dreaming, Being weaves neuroscience, meditation, and Indian and Western intellectual traditions to investigate consciousness and the sense of self. Previous episodes have featured Patricia Churchland on neurophilosophy, Thomas Metzinger on the ego tunnel, and Alva Noë on his book Out of Our…
  • Things As They Are

    Ben Ehrlich
    22 Jun 2015 | 8:21 am
                        The Los Angeles Review of Books has a review of the new book by philosopher of mind John Searle. Building on his 1983 classic Intentionality, Seeing Things As They Are, argues for perception as a form of direct realism. “The central claim of direct realism,” the critic John Armstrong writes, “is that perception puts the external world into contact with the subjective one.” Searle looks to visual science for his theoretical process; our sensory receptors sense light rays, which are processed by…
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    The Neurocritic

  • Scary Brains and the Garden of Earthly Deep Dreams

    The Neurocritic
    19 Jul 2015 | 2:38 pm
    In case you've been living under a rock the past few weeks, Google's foray into artificial neural networks has yielded hundreds of thousands of phantasmagoric images. The company has an obvious interest in image classification, and here's how they explain the DeepDream process in their Research Blog:Inceptionism: Going Deeper into Neural Networks . . .We train an artificial neural network by showing it millions of training examples [of dogs and eyes and pagodas, let's say] and gradually adjusting the network parameters until it gives the classifications we want. The network typically consists…
  • Can Tetris Reduce Intrusive Memories of a Trauma Film?

    The Neurocritic
    14 Jul 2015 | 5:23 pm
    For some inexplicable reason, you watched the torture gore horror film Hostel over the weekend. On Monday, you're having trouble concentrating at work. Images of severed limbs and bludgeoned heads keep intruding on your attempts to code or write a paper. So you decide to read about the making of Hostel.You end up seeing pictures of the most horrifying scenes from the movie. It's all way too way much to simply shake off so then you decide to play Tetris. But a funny thing happens. The unwelcome images start to become less frequent. By Friday, the gory mental snapshots are no longer forcing…
  • Who Will Pay for All the New DBS Implants?

    The Neurocritic
    27 Jun 2015 | 11:47 pm
    Recently, Science and Nature had news features on big BRAIN funding for the development of deep brain stimulation technologies. The ultimate aim of this research is to treat and correct malfunctioning neural circuits in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Both pieces raised ethical issues, focused on device manufacturers and potential military applications, respectively.A different ethical concern, not mentioned in either article, is who will have access to these new devices, and who is going to pay the medical costs once they hit the market. DBS for movement disorders is a test case,…
  • The Future of Depression Treatment

    The Neurocritic
    21 Jun 2015 | 2:53 am
    2014Jessica is depressed again. After six straight weeks of overtime, her boss blandly praised her teamwork at the product launch party. And the following week she was passed over for a promotion in favor of Jason, her junior co-worker. "It's always that way, I'll never get ahead..." She arrives at her therapist's office late, looking stressed, disheveled, and dejected. The same old feelings of worthlessness and despair prompted her to resume her medication and CBT routine."You deserve to be recognized for your work," said Dr. Harrison. "The things you're telling yourself right now are…
  • 8 1/2 Reward Prediction Errors: #MovieDirectorNeuroscientistMashup

    The Neurocritic
    14 Jun 2015 | 8:57 pm
    Fellini/Schultz: 8½ Reward Prediction ErrorsOn Twitter, movie/brain buff My Cousin Amygdala issued the #MovieDirectorNeuroscientistMashup challenge using the following selections:I made a few movie posters to go along with my suggestions...Kurosawa/Tonegawa: Rashomon and the Memory EngramDavid Lynch/Eric Kandel: Blue Velvet AplysiaWrite-in nominations were allowed, too.@CousinAmygdala or an action movie by Woo/Kanwisher: 'Fusiform Face Off'— rogier kievit (@rogierK) June 14, 2015@CousinAmygdala Write-in: Scorsese / Eleanor Maguire - Taxi Driver's Hippocampus— Mariam Aly (@mariam_s_aly)…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • Microscopic Synapses and Giant Microscopes

    Bruno Dubuc
    18 Jul 2015 | 8:36 am
    More and more courses are being offered for free online by prestigious universities. Many of these courses deal with various aspects of the cognitive sciences. One such course is “The Fundamentals of Neuroscience”, from Harvard University (see first link below). This course includes various multimedia features, including an excellent 30-minute documentary video entitled “Connectomics: Big Microscopes & Tiny Synapses” (second link below). This video presents the research being done by Professor Jeff Lichtman and his colleagues in his laboratory, who are using images of real human…
  • The Physiology of Expanded Consciousness

    Bruno Dubuc
    30 Jun 2015 | 1:02 pm
    The results of some studies are exactly what you would have predicted, but that doesn’t make them any less interesting. For example, the study reported in the link below found that taking psilocybin (the psychoactive substance in “magic mushrooms”) puts the brain in a state that is conducive to freer associations, somewhat as in dreams. So no big surprise there. But the researchers still had to use some ingenious methods to demonstrate this finding: a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging with an original technique for measuring entropy in the activity of various networks…
  • The McGurk Effect: An Auditory Illusion

    Bruno Dubuc
    9 Jun 2015 | 8:51 am
    This week’s post will be brief, so that you can get out and enjoy the start of summer and the restoratjve effects of nature, but the subject is very intriguing. Have you ever heard of the McGurk effect? It’s an auditory illusion that shows just how much our brains construct our auditory perceptions not only from what we hear but also from what we see. In the case of spoken words, what we see is the mouth of the person who is talking to us. If you watch a video where, on the audio track, someone is actually saying “ba”, but in the image, their mouth is pronouncing the sound “fa”,…
  • The Evolution of Language, From Animals to Analogy

    Bruno Dubuc
    27 May 2015 | 7:18 am
    Language is a communication tool that relies very heavily on analogy. In fact, according to Douglas Hofstadter and Emmanuel Sander, authors of Surfaces and Essences: Analogy As the Fuel and Fire of Thinking (2013), analogy plays a fundamental role in the very way we think. Hofstadter now admits that when he wrote his book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, which is full of daring analogies and became something of a cult in the 1980s, he had not really explored all the implications of analogy as a way of transferring knowledge from one field to another. Today, however, he regards…
  • Preserving Our Bodies and Minds from the Ills of Civilization

    Bruno Dubuc
    13 May 2015 | 6:22 am
    For several hundreds of thousands of years, human beings lived and evolved in small groups of hunter-gatherers whose environment was the natural world. It is only for the past 10,000 years or so that we have lived first in villages, and then in cities. Today, a large proportion of us live in megalopolises and work in factories or offices where we have little contact with nature. And what is worse, our contacts with one another are becoming more and more virtual, and our emotional bonds weaker and weaker. Thus, over what is a very short timespan from an evolutionary standpoint, the human body…
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    Your Brain Health

  • How to: Scientist to Communicator

    Sarah McKay
    11 Jul 2015 | 10:44 pm
    Ready to hang up your lab coat and enter the world of science, health and medical communications? But not really sure what the options are and what steps you should take next? I’m thrilled to offer my one-to-one ‘Scientist to Communicator’ training days for scientists, academics, PhDs, postdocs or health professionals interested in a career in health, medical or science […] The post How to: Scientist to Communicator appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Smartphone app shows a wandering mind is an unhappy mind.

    Sarah McKay
    2 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    An intriguing paper called ‘A wandering mind is an unhappy mind,’ was published in the journal Science a couple of years ago, and I stumbled upon it this week. It describes a smartphone app that samples people’s ongoing thoughts, feelings, and actions during the course of the day. If you’re curious how an app can be used […] The post Smartphone app shows a wandering mind is an unhappy mind. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Healthy Brain, Happy Life – June Walking Book Club

    Sarah McKay
    4 Jun 2015 | 1:00 pm
    I’m obsessed with podcasts and listen to numerous episodes a week – whenever I’m exercising, walking the dog, driving, cooking dinner, folding clothes, watching my boys’ swimming lessons…. you get the picture. Top of my list each week Jonathan Fields’ ‘The Good Life Project’. Last week Jonathan interviewed a neuro-rockstar — Dr. Wendy A. Suzuki […] The post Healthy Brain, Happy Life – June Walking Book Club appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • My TEDx talk ‘Indulge Your Neurobiology’

    Sarah McKay
    2 Jun 2015 | 6:25 pm
    Here it is: My TEDxNorthernSydneyInstitute talk ‘Indulge Your Neurobiology‘. In my talk I share my brain hack to improve memory, spark creativity, and regulate emotions. I discovered this life-changing tool when I left the neuroscience research lab behind and starting focussing on brain health and wellbeing in everyday life. You won’t need an app, course […] The post My TEDx talk ‘Indulge Your Neurobiology’ appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Guess what? You’re not your job.

    Sarah McKay
    30 May 2015 | 11:13 pm
    Thanks to Bek Lambert from Hacking Happiness for another savvy reminder of the blurring of the lines between work, home and self.  When you spend upwards of 50 hours a week at work, the separation between who we are as people and who we are as workers becomes difficult. This is not surprising on paper. After all, it […] The post Guess what? You’re not your job. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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    Brain Protips

  • Dietary Prophylaxis Against Diabetes & Heart Disease

    brainprotips@gmail.com
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:01 am
    Brain health is intimately linked to heart health and glucose homeostasis (regulation of blood sugar). Brain Health and Cardiovascular Disease The brain is extremely vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chronic hypertension. The most extreme manifestation of this link is hypertensive encephalopathy. High blood pressure causes the cerebral circulation (blood flow in the brain) to […] The post Dietary Prophylaxis Against Diabetes & Heart Disease appeared first on Brain Protips.
  • Lifestyle Factors That Affect Brain Health: Exercise

    brainprotips@gmail.com
    1 Aug 2015 | 8:49 am
    The impact of lifestyle factors on brain health is significant. Such factors include diet, exercise, social activity, environmental enrichment, educational attainment, occupation, psychosocial stress, and exposure to adverse life circumstances. Recent evidence has emerged that Alzheimer’s disease may a exist on a continuum with normal brain aging. The Brain Health Spectrum   This model suggests that t The post Lifestyle Factors That Affect Brain Health: Exercise appeared first on Brain Protips.
  • What To Do About Adderall Headaches

    brainprotips@gmail.com
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:16 am
    Adderall Headaches are Common Headaches are listed as a common side effect  of Adderall use, with an incidence greater than 10%. In most  cases, there is no immediate danger associated with an Adderall headache, though chronic headaches can be very uncomfortable or even debilitating. However, you should seek immediate medical attention if your headache (1) comes […] The post What To Do About Adderall Headaches appeared first on Brain Protips.
  • Adderall and Klonopin: Interactions, Adverse Effects, and Dosage

    brainprotips@gmail.com
    22 Jul 2015 | 1:04 pm
    How Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) Affects the Brain Adderall is comprised of four amphetamine salts and is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Adderall is also sometimes used off-label in the treatment of depression or obesity. Adderall works by promoting catecholamine release (dopamine, norepinephrine) at synapses (brain connections).  How […] The post Adderall and Klonopin: Interactions, Adverse Effects, and Dosage appeared first on Brain Protips.
  • Bounce Back After The Infamous Adderall Comedown

    brainprotips@gmail.com
    19 Jul 2015 | 5:53 pm
    The Adderall Comedown For the purposes of this guide, let’s say that you use Adderall recreationally (and don’t have ADHD). Or maybe you use Adderall on an as needed basis to improve the efficiency of your studying regimen before exams. During an Adderall comedown, you’re probably sleep deprived and physically exhausted but mentally hyperactive. You wish […] The post Bounce Back After The Infamous Adderall Comedown appeared first on Brain Protips.
 
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