Neuroscience

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  • How do we hear time within sound?

    Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    How does our auditory system represent time within a sound? A new study published in PLOS Computational Biology investigates how temporal acoustic patterns can be represented by neural activity...
  • New strategies for anesthesia

    MIT News - Neuroscience
    Elizabeth Dougherty | MIT Spectrum
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:33 pm
    In operating rooms around the world, machines attached to anesthetized patients blip and bleep, reporting second-by-second accounts of vital organs. Blood circulation and respiration are closely monitored, but the one organ that is drugged, the brain, has no readout. Anesthesiologists simply watch for signs of wakening, says Emery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at MIT. Brown, who won a 2007 National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award to study how anesthesia drugs work, hopes to change that. Stat. Anesthesia drugs have…
  • Spike activity 17-04-2015

    Mind Hacks
    vaughanbell
    18 Apr 2015 | 2:26 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The latest instalment of ‘the seductive allure of neuroscience’ has been released (aka the force awakens) – a solid study suggest spurious neuroscience adds weight to explanations. Great coverage from the BPS Research Digest. Aeon asks an interesting question: throughout evolutionary history, we never saw anything like a montage. So why do we hardly notice the cuts in movies? There’s an excellent Motherboard documentary on the contested future of autonomous military robots you can watch online. To the bunkers!
  • Want to Be More Attractive? Science Says Have a Drink.

    Neuromarketing
    Roger Dooley
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Getting your business portrait photo taken? Meeting new people at a networking event? Here's some counter-intuitive advice...
  • Your friends know how long you will live.

    Deric's MindBlog
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    An interesting study from Jackson et al. analyzing data from an east coast cohort of 600 people observed in the 1930s through 2013: Although self-rated personality traits predict mortality risk, no study has examined whether one’s friends can perceive personality characteristics that predict one’s mortality risk. Moreover, it is unclear whether observers’ reports (compared with self-reports) provide better or unique information concerning the personal characteristics that result in longer and healthier lives. To test whether friends’ reports of personality predict mortality risk, we…
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Kids with ADHD must squirm to learn, study says

    17 Apr 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Excessive movement common among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, a new study shows. The findings show the longtime prevailing methods for helping children with ADHD may be misguided.
  • Telling the time of day by color

    17 Apr 2015 | 11:52 am
    New research has revealed that the color of light has a major impact on how the brain clock measures time of day and on how the animals' physiology and behavior adjust accordingly. The study, for the first time, provides a neuronal mechanism for how our internal clock can measure changes in light color that accompany dawn and dusk.
  • Artificial blood vessel lets researchers better assess clot removal devices

    17 Apr 2015 | 11:50 am
    An in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel has been created that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models to test new devices or approaches.
  • Study links brain anatomy, academic achievement, and family income

    17 Apr 2015 | 9:19 am
    Many years of research have shown that for students from lower-income families, standardized test scores and other measures of academic success tend to lag behind those of wealthier students. A new study offers another dimension to this so-called "achievement gap": After imaging the brains of high- and low-income students, they found that the higher-income students had thicker brain cortex in areas associated with visual perception and knowledge accumulation. Furthermore, these differences also correlated with one measure of academic achievement -- performance on standardized tests.
  • New studies about endovascular therapy for stroke represent paradigm shift

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
    An expert who writes an accompanying editorial for five studies about endovascular stroke therapy published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine says these randomized clinical trials represent a breakthrough in showing the benefits of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic strokes.
 
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    MIT News - Neuroscience

  • Biologists identify brain tumor weakness

    Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
    8 Apr 2015 | 10:00 am
    Biologists at MIT and the Whitehead Institute have discovered a vulnerability of brain cancer cells that could be exploited to develop more-effective drugs against brain tumors. The study, led by researchers from the Whitehead Institute and MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, found that a subset of glioblastoma tumor cells is dependent on a particular enzyme that breaks down the amino acid glycine. Without this enzyme, toxic metabolic byproducts build up inside the tumor cells, and they die. Blocking this enzyme in glioblastoma cells could offer a new way to combat such…
  • New strategies for anesthesia

    Elizabeth Dougherty | MIT Spectrum
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:33 pm
    In operating rooms around the world, machines attached to anesthetized patients blip and bleep, reporting second-by-second accounts of vital organs. Blood circulation and respiration are closely monitored, but the one organ that is drugged, the brain, has no readout. Anesthesiologists simply watch for signs of wakening, says Emery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at MIT. Brown, who won a 2007 National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award to study how anesthesia drugs work, hopes to change that. Stat. Anesthesia drugs have…
  • Decoding sugar addiction

    Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    29 Jan 2015 | 9:00 am
    Together, obesity and Type 2 diabetes rank among our nation’s greatest health problem, and they largely result from what many call an “addiction” to sugar. But solving this problem is more complicated than solving drug addiction, because it requires reducing the drive to eat unhealthy foods without affecting the desire to eat healthy foods when hungry. In a new paper in Cell, neuroscientists at MIT have untangled these two processes in mice and shown that inhibiting a previously unknown brain circuit that regulates compulsive sugar consumption does not interfere with healthy eating.
  • MIT researchers find where visual memories are made

    Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    20 Jan 2015 | 11:09 am
    In findings that may lead to new treatments for cognitive disorders, researchers at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory zero in on how the brain forms memories of what has been seen. In a paper appearing this week in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience, a research team led by Mark Bear, the Picower Professor of Neuroscience, showed that dramatic changes occur in the primary visual cortex when mice learn to distinguish novel from familiar visual stimuli. Manipulations that prevented the changes in visual cortex also blocked memory formation. Impairments in detecting and…
  • New fibers can deliver many simultaneous stimuli

    David L. Chandler | MIT News Office
    19 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study — not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously. Conventional neural probes are designed to record a single type of signaling, limiting the information that can be derived from the brain at any point in time. Now researchers at MIT may have found a way to change that. By producing complex multimodal fibers that could be less than the width of a hair, they have created a system that could deliver optical signals and drugs directly into the brain, along with…
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Comments of the Week #56: From dark energy’s existence to fine-tuning [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    18 Apr 2015 | 8:47 am
    “Originality is the fine art of remembering what you hear but forgetting where you heard it.” -Laurence J. Peter This past week was a super busy one on Starts With A Bang, from dark energy to stars to a fabulous book review and more! Just in the last seven days, we’ve looked at: What if dark energy isn’t real? (for Ask Ethan), The great yogurt tragedy (for our Weekend Diversion), The cosmic sombrero (for Mostly Mute Monday), Einstein, Schrödinger, and the story you never heard (a review of Paul Halpern’s new book), What the hell are baryon acoustic oscillations?, and…
  • Sketches of Boz [Aardvarchaeology]

    Martin R
    18 Apr 2015 | 5:20 am
    In the second novel-length third of Stephen Jarvis’s hefty Death and Mr Pickwick, artist and caricaturist Robert Seymour starts in earnest to put ideas together for the Pickwick Papers. Yes, that’s right: here (as maybe in reality) it is the illustrator who comes up with the concept for the book, but being dyslexic and proud he doesn’t want to write it himself. Narrative pictures with brief “letterpress” text added by someone else afterwards is an established form at the time. Charles Dickens finally makes his entrance on the novel’s stage, first as as “Chatham…
  • The Real Access Problem with the Hugos [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    18 Apr 2015 | 5:20 am
    There has been a lot of stuff written in response to the Hugo award nomination mess, most of it stupid. Some of it is stupid to such an impressive degree that it actually makes me feel sympathetic toward people who I know are wrong about everything. One of the few exceptions is the long essay by Eric Flint. This comes as a mild surprise, as I’ve always mentally lumped him in with the folks whose incessant political wrangling was a blight on Usenet’s rec.arts.sf.written back in the day; now I can’t remember if he was actually one of the annoying idiots, or if I’ve…
  • Friday Cephalopod: Another step in the fusion of cephalopod and technology [Pharyngula]

    PZ Myers
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:24 pm
    They know how to use gadgets!
  • Ask Ethan #84: Where did light first come from? (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:50 pm
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.” -Terry Pratchett If you want, you can imagine back in the Universe to a time before it looked anything like ours did. Before there was life, before there were planets, galaxies, stars, or even neutral atoms. Yet going back even to those times, there was still light, and there were still photons. Image credit: the Cosmic Microwave Background of Penzias and Wilson, via…
 
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    Deric's MindBlog

  • Your friends know how long you will live.

    17 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    An interesting study from Jackson et al. analyzing data from an east coast cohort of 600 people observed in the 1930s through 2013: Although self-rated personality traits predict mortality risk, no study has examined whether one’s friends can perceive personality characteristics that predict one’s mortality risk. Moreover, it is unclear whether observers’ reports (compared with self-reports) provide better or unique information concerning the personal characteristics that result in longer and healthier lives. To test whether friends’ reports of personality predict mortality risk, we…
  • Positive and negative emotions - valence is not value

    16 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    Having done several recent posts on positive emotions,  and given the continuing rise of the "Be Happy" industry with its Be Happy Apps, I thought it appropriate to pass on this pithy and appropriate critique by June Gruber, of the idea that happiness is always good, sadness is always bad: One idea in the study of emotion and its impact on psychological health is overdue for retirement: that negative emotions (like sadness or fear) are inherently bad or maladaptive for our psychological well-being, and positive emotions (like happiness or joy) are inherently good or adaptive. Such…
  • What happens in Vagus - compassion, positive emotion, vagal tone, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia,

    15 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    The 10th cranial nerve, the vagus nerve, is distinctive to mammals and supports social engagement and nurturing behaviors as well as feeding, digesting, resting, breeding, etc. Its level of activity (tonus, or tension) is reflected in its inhibitory regulation of heartbeat, slowing it during exhalation and increasing it during inhalation. This change is heart rate is called respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Thus RSA serves as a measure of vagal tone. Dacher Keltner and collaborators have studied the relationship of vagal activity, reflected by RSA, to compassion and other prosocial…
  • The science of mind wandering.

    14 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    I want to pass on this reference to an Ann. Rev. of Psychology article by Smallwood and Schooler, an extensive review and description of mind wandering, its disengagement from external input, its costs and benefits, its association with medial brain structures of the default mode network, its regulation by more lateral frontal executive control and external attention networks, etc. Here is the abstract, followed by a useful summary graphic: Conscious experience is fluid; it rarely remains on one topic for an extended period without deviation. Its dynamic nature is illustrated by the…
  • Manipulating moral decisions by exploiting eye gaze.

    13 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    Here is a fascinating piece of work from Pärnamets et al.: Eye gaze is a window onto cognitive processing in tasks such as spatial memory, linguistic processing, and decision making. We present evidence that information derived from eye gaze can be used to change the course of individuals’ decisions, even when they are reasoning about high-level, moral issues. Previous studies have shown that when an experimenter actively controls what an individual sees the experimenter can affect simple decisions with alternatives of almost equal valence. Here we show that if an experimenter passively…
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    Brain Blogger

  • Deciphering Troubled Teens’ Risk-Taking Behavior

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    The rebellious teenager makes everyone edgy. Their parents are an anxious lot. Their teachers are at their wit’s end trying to figure out ways to rein them in. The traffic sergeants roll their eyes in exasperation when they land up drunk behind the wheel. Sociologists are intrigued and want to know what is it that makes them act the way they do — is it genes, hormones, a rite of passage, peer pressure, or an entirely unknown reason? Risk-taking behavior in adolescents is also a cause for concern. These kids are not only exposing themselves to danger with their penchant for speed,…
  • Opening the Classroom Door for Children with Autism

    Lisa Combs, MA
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:16 am
    We can all probably remember how we were taught to swim. Some of us had parents who took us to swimming lessons in a safely constructed pool at the local YMCA, with numerous, trained adults right next to us in the pool and floaties on our arms, while we paddled on a kickboard for as long as necessary until we were ready to swim independently. Others had the parents who just surprised them one day on summer vacation by sneaking up on them on the dock, hoisting them into the air, and jettisoning them into the dark and unknown depths of a lake, figuring they would jump in and help if they…
  • Learning Skills and Psychosis

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    14 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    As a doctor of clinical psychology, I address differently the problem of psychosis. I approach psychosis as a result of trauma and mental phenomena as opposed focusing on the brain, the empirical and the medical model of mental illness. I was very recently reading an article on the subject of new advances in medications to treat disorders that implicate the biochemistry of the brain. This article was entitled “Brain Boom”, and it was written by Mathew Herper. In this article it was stated that, in treating schizophrenia: “Currently, drugs can be effective at treating hallucinations and…
  • Microglia – Part 1, Definitions and Developmental Progression

    Matthew Zabel, PhD
    12 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    One of the more remarkable advances in neuroscience, perhaps on par with Santiago Ramon y Cajal’s Neuron Doctrine (the theory that distinct neurons are the functional units of the brain), is the discovery of microglia — appropriately by Cajal’s student Pio del Rio Hortega. Since their discovery, microglia have been the center of controversy in many contexts (i.e. ontogeny, neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, disease, etc.). This is not an overstatement. For example, Hortega surmised (correctly), back in the 1920s, that these cells hailed from the mesoderm, rather than the…
  • Nurturing The Brain – Part 3, Red Wine

    Sara Adaes, PhD (c)
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Have you ever heard of the “French paradox”? This concept originated in the 1980s and refers to the epidemiological observation that French people have a relatively low incidence of cardiovascular diseases despite having a diet rich in saturated fats. Although it has been argued that the French paradox may be an illusion due to statistical distortions and the way health statistics are collected in France, it did promote a lot of research interest around what could be allowing the French to eat saturated fats and avoid cardiovascular disease. Soon, many possible explanations for the French…
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    Mind Hacks

  • Spike activity 17-04-2015

    vaughanbell
    18 Apr 2015 | 2:26 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The latest instalment of ‘the seductive allure of neuroscience’ has been released (aka the force awakens) – a solid study suggest spurious neuroscience adds weight to explanations. Great coverage from the BPS Research Digest. Aeon asks an interesting question: throughout evolutionary history, we never saw anything like a montage. So why do we hardly notice the cuts in movies? There’s an excellent Motherboard documentary on the contested future of autonomous military robots you can watch online. To the bunkers!
  • Long corridors of the mind

    vaughanbell
    16 Apr 2015 | 12:55 pm
    I’ve just read Barbara Taylor‘s brilliant book The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times which blends her own experiences as a patient in one of the last remaining asylums with an incisive look at the changing face of mental health care since the Victorian era. Taylor is a renowned historian but the book is not what you’d expect. It’s scandalous, searingly honest and often a exquisitely observed look at herself and others as they made shaky orbits around the mental health system. Through severe mental unwellness, the state mental health system, and a searching…
  • She’s giving me hallucinations

    vaughanbell
    11 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Last year I did a talk in London on auditory hallucinations, The Beach Boys and the psychology and neuroscience of hallucinated voices, and I’ve just discovered the audio is available online. It was part of the Pint of Science festival where they got scientists to talk about their area of research in the pub, which is exactly what I did. The audio is hosted on SoundCloud which gives you an online stream but there’s no mp3 download facility. However, if you type the page URL into the AnythingToMP3 service it’ll present you with you an mp3 to download. It was a fun talk, so do…
  • Spike activity 10-04-2015

    vaughanbell
    11 Apr 2015 | 2:41 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: A new series of BBC Radio 4’s mind and brain magazine programme All in the Mind has just kicked off. The New York Times has an excellent piece on America’s mental illness fuelled, jail and treatment revolving door: For Mentally Ill Inmates, a Cycle of Jail and Hospitals. One of the few good, balanced pieces on the recent ‘genetics of sex offending’ study appeared in The Independent. Full open-access paper here if you want the original source. MIT Tech Review reports an example of how the newly cloudified IBM AI…
  • A fluctuating wellness

    vaughanbell
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    The New York Review of Books has an excellent new piece by Oliver Sacks where he describes the psychological effects of cancer treatment in terms of its effects on the ‘homeostasis of well being’. The article weaves together the role of the autonomic nervous system, the progression of migraine and the repressions and releases of cancer treatment. Indeed, everything comes and goes, and if one could take a scan or inner photograph of the body at such times, one would see vascular beds opening and closing, peristalsis accelerating or stopping, viscera squirming or tightening in…
 
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • Fellow, Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society

    NELB Staff
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Fellow, Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society Description Stanford Law School invites applications for the 2015-2016 Fellowship in the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society (SPINS), part of the Center for Law and the Biosciences. The Goal This fellowship is...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    9 Apr 2015 | 5:57 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Brain Development in Children Could be Affected by Poverty, Study Shows, The Guardian In The Popular Press: Sushi Science: A 3-D View Of The Body's Wasabi Receptor, NPR Shots Blog Art for the Knowing Nose,...
  • "Bad Boys’ Brains: Law, Neuroscience and the Gender of ‘Aggressive’ Behavior"

    NELB Staff
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:08 am
    Recently published in SSRN (and recently published in Gendered Neurocultures: Feminist and Queer Perspectives on Current Brain Discourses, Zaglossus, Vienna, 2014 (eds. Sigrid Schmitz and Grit Hoppner)): "Bad Boys’ Brains: Law, Neuroscience and the Gender of ‘Aggressive’ Behavior" KAREN O'CONNELL,...
  • "Behavioral Public Choice and the Law"

    NELB Staff
    3 Apr 2015 | 4:05 am
    Recently published in SSRN (and forthcoming in West Virginia Law Review, Vol. 118 (2015)): "Behavioral Public Choice and the Law" GARY LUCAS, JR., Texas A&M School of Law SLAVISA TASIC, University of Mary Behavioral public choice is the study of...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    2 Apr 2015 | 10:15 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Bioethics Commission Releases Final Neuroscience Report as Part of BRAIN Initiative: Focuses on Controversial Topics that Must be Addressed if Neuroscience is to Progress and be Applied Ethically, The Blog of the Presidential Commission for...
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    Neuromarketing

  • The Simple Sales Booster That Almost Nobody Uses

    Roger Dooley
    14 Apr 2015 | 6:23 am
    A recent test described by WhichTestWon showed adding a single line of text to a web page could boost sales, from a few percent to 200+%. Yet, very few websites use this technique. Do you?
  • Neuromarketing Careers

    Roger Dooley
    8 Apr 2015 | 1:04 pm
    Are you looking for a career in neuromarketing, or as some prefer to call it, consumer neuroscience? How should you pursue that goal? Is such a goal even a good idea? I’ll try to provide answers, or at least some [...]
  • Brainfluence Podcast: Shankman, Kawasaki, and 8 More

    Roger Dooley
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    Latest Brainfluence Podcast episodes feature Guy Kawasaki, Peter Shankman, and 8 others discussing loyalty, social media, branding, habit formation, neuromarketing and lots more.
  • Want to Be More Attractive? Science Says Have a Drink.

    Roger Dooley
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Getting your business portrait photo taken? Meeting new people at a networking event? Here's some counter-intuitive advice...
  • Habit Summit 2015: My Deck, and a Surprise Takeaway

    Roger Dooley
    26 Mar 2015 | 6:46 am
    This year’s Habit Summit, organized by Nir Eyal (author of the best-selling Hooked), proved to be one of the more interesting conferences I’ve attended or spoken at. The focus was on building habit-forming products, and the speakers were carefully selected [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • New report by the Institute of Medicine on cognitive health promotion

    SharpBrains
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:46 am
    Title: Cognitive Aging: Progress in Understanding and Opportunities for Action Report brief (opens PDF) Read full report online Description: People forget things—a name, where they put their keys, a phone number—and yet what is dismissed as a minor inconvenience at 25 years of age, can evolve into a momentary anxiety at 35, and a major source of personal worry at ages 55 or 60. Forgetfulness at older ages is often equated with a decline in cognition—a public health issue that goes beyond memory lapses and one that can have significant impacts on independent living and healthy aging.
  • Brain training gains traction in Europe with Peak and Memorado funding rounds

    SharpBrains
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:17 am
    Brain training start-up Peak secures $7m Series A funding (startups UK): “London-based brain training app Peak has closed a $7m Series A round led by Creandum – known for its early investment in Spotify – with participation from existing investors DN Capital, London Venture Partners (LVP) and Qualcomm Ventures.” Peak co-founder and CEO, Itamar Lesuisse, commented: “…With the rise in the popularity of using smartphones to monitor physical health, it’s only a matter of time before data relating to cognitive well being is given an equal level of value and credence.” Memorado…
  • How mindfulness meditation is infiltrating the corporate world

    Greater Good Magazine
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:13 am
    I thought I’d read everything about mindfulness, but this was news to me: Steve Jobs was a meditator. Back in 1981, long before mindfulness meditation became a popular subject of scientific inquiry, Jobs, the cofounder and public face of Apple Computers, was already practicing mindfulness as a way to calm his mind, stay focused, and feel happier. According to David Gelles, business reporter for the New York Times, Jobs is not some lone outlier—the number of business leaders embracing mindfulness is at an all time high, and growing. To write his new book, Mindful Work: How Meditation Is…
  • Next: Is it a videogame, or an FDA-approved medical treatment?

    SharpBrains
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:29 am
    Play This Video Game and Call Me in the Morning (KQED): “The brain network that controls multitasking connects with networks that control memory and attention span. So by playing the game, some scientists believe you can improve cognitive skills, and by extension, relieve a range of symptoms associated with attention deficit disorder, and other conditions… While most start-ups have opted to market and sell their mobile weight loss games and diabetes trackers directly to consumers, Akili has decided to pursue the long, expensive, risky path of clinical trials through the Food and Drug…
  • Why the quantified self requires both tech tools and smart brains

    SharpBrains
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:35 am
    Tech tools to measure performance can fall short (Financial Times): “Benjamin Franklin could be considered a pioneer of the modern “quantified self” approach to personal improvement. In the late 18th century, he famously used a chart to monitor his behaviour, including acts of virtue, and reviewed his record of daily activities every night… In the Fitbit era, companies have a dizzying array of tech tools for setting and tracking work goals Franklin-style…However, critics worry that the less measurable but equally crucial tasks will be ignored. Because targets focus attention, they…
 
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • BSP 117: Michael Gazzaniga "Father"of Cognitive Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    Dr. Michael Gazzinga (click photo to listen to his interview) Pioneering neuroscientist Dr. Michael Gazzaniga has written many wonderful books that share neuroscience with a general audience. In his latest book Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience he looks back on his 50+ year career from a uniquely personally vantage point. He shares the people and collaborations that have enriched his life and when I interviewed him for BSP 117  he said “My pitch to the young person is that there is nothing on this planet that compares to the pleasures of…
  • BSP 116: Norman Doidge on Brain Plasticity

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:30 pm
    This month psychiatrist Norman Doidge returns to the Brain Science Podcast to discuss his new book The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers, which is a follow-up to his best-seller The Brain That Changes Itself (BSP 26). In this interview Dr. Doidge and I focus on the underlying principles of brain plasticity and their clinical implications. Although brain plasticity is well-established in the research community it has not yet fully penetrated clinical medicine where old views, which seen the brain as largely fixed in adulthood, make…
  • BSP 115: Eastern Philosophy and Western Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:13 pm
    Scientific interest in the Mind and Consciousness is relatively new, but both Western and Eastern Philosophy have a long tradition of exploring these topics. In his new book Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy, Evan Thompson explores how these diverse traditions can inform and enrich one another.Thompson goes beyond a narrow view of consciousness, which focuses only on the waking state. Instead he considers how dreaming, lucid dreaming, and even near death experiences can advance our understanding of how our brain's…
  • Brain Science Podcast Celebrates 8 Years of Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Ginger CampbeLL, host of the Brain Science Podcast  (L>R: Greta, Rusty, & Jake) The first episode of the Brain Science Podcast appeared on December 5, 2006, which makes it one of the longest running shows in any genre, not just science or medicine. I am especially proud of the fact that we have reached listeners in 219 different countries. BSP 114 is our 8th annual review episode and as a part of our year-end celebration all previous annual review episodes have been added to the FREE feed that also includes our most recent 25 episodes.The goal of our annual review episode is to…
  • "Neuroplasticity and Healing" (BSP 113)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    1 Dec 2014 | 9:29 am
    Click to play BSP 113 The Dalai Lama's first visit to Alabama included several large public gatherings but I was invited to attend "Neuroplasticity and Healing," which was the scientific symposium he hosted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). The featured neuroscientists were Dr. Edward Taub and Dr. Michael Merzenich. The moderator was Dr. Norman Doidge.The Dalai Lama has a long-standing interest in science and he told the rapt audience that his four areas of interest are cosmology, physics, neurobiology, and psychology.He is very interested in neuroplasticity and his visit to…
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    "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich

  • One of my secrets for getting my daily physical exercise

    Dr. Merzenich
    1 Apr 2015 | 12:18 pm
    You probably know that I strongly recommend that you spend 10-30 (or more) minutes every day at the brain gym (www.brainhq.com).  For me, that’s 30 minutes spent on my laptop working on my BrainHQ Personal Trainer regimen when I first arrive in the morning at my office—but it could be almost anytime in my daily […]The post One of my secrets for getting my daily physical exercise appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Are Crime and Incarceration Predictable and Preventable?

    Dr. Merzenich
    24 Mar 2015 | 1:43 pm
    As an alumnus, I recently read an article published in the Johns Hopkins Magazine written about a part-time faculty member in their distinguished Bloomberg School or Public health, Gerald Eber.  Eber is also an ACLU lawyer whose primary concern has been the health care of Americans in prison.  The medical treatment of prisoners, in Eber’s […]The post Are Crime and Incarceration Predictable and Preventable? appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Chris Borland Chooses Brain Health Over NFL Career

    Dr. Merzenich
    17 Mar 2015 | 12:43 pm
    A few days ago, a young linebacker on the San Francisco 49ers, clearly destined to be a star player in the National Football League, hung up his cleats. Chris Borland, a highly honored University of Wisconsin player who had had a wonderful rookie NFL season, decided that the risks for his brain health were just […]The post Chris Borland Chooses Brain Health Over NFL Career appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Acetylcholine Release Amps Up Brain’s Plasticity

    Dr. Merzenich
    5 Mar 2015 | 11:51 am
    I met yesterday with a former doctoral student, now a professor at the University of Texas in Dallas, Michael Kilgard. As a research fellow in my UCSF laboratory, Dr. Kilgard studied the conditions under which acetycholine enables brain plasticity—showing among other findings that large scale and highly useful plasticity can be achieved by pairing sensory […]The post Acetylcholine Release Amps Up Brain’s Plasticity appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Are “Helicopter Parents” Creating a …

    Dr. Merzenich
    25 Feb 2015 | 11:48 am
    One of the negative consequences of our high tech- and fear-dominated modern culture is the systematic withdrawal of children from independent and exploratory play, in natural social and physical environments. Our fear culture frustrates outside, unfettered exploration for the developing child. Parents can be arrested for leaving their children to play on their own, in […]The post Are “Helicopter Parents” Creating a … appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
 
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Grab Your Torch and Pitchforks

    Steven Novella
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:12 am
    I always find it disturbing to see people, especially in large crowds, apparently acting according to primitive emotions rather than enlightened thinking. It makes it seem like the veneer of civilization is paper thin, and we are not far removed from apes huddled around the monolith and hitting each other over the head with bones. We can get on top of it, but that is a high energy state. Entropy is forever dragging us down to the lowest common denominator of tribalism, fear, disgust, and paranoia. As Sagan wrote in the Demon-Haunted World: Whenever our ethnic or national prejudices are…
  • Mission to Mars

    Steven Novella
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:04 am
    Mars is an interesting place. The more we study the surface of the planet with our various robot labs, the more interesting it becomes. This is one of the reasons that it is very enticing to send people to Mars, but there is debate about the feasibility of any mission to Mars over the next few decades. Life on Mars Recently the Curiosity rover found evidence that suggests there might be briny liquid water just under the surface of Mars. When the temperature and humidity are just right, salts in the Martian soil could absorb moisture from the air creating a subsurface briny liquid water. This…
  • FDA and Homeopathy

    Steven Novella
    14 Apr 2015 | 5:10 am
    The skeptical community is abuzz with the announcement by the FDA’s announcement that they are reviewing the “regulatory framework” of homeopathic products and are open to public input. We have written about this at Science-Based Medicine, and as you can imagine, this is a serious topic of discussion among the editors. Background The FDA regulates food, drugs, medical devices, supplements, and cosmetics for the purpose of protecting the public health and safety. Congress created the FDA and determines its powers. In the 1938 FDA act, one Senator, Royal Copeland, who was a…
  • No Jab, No Pay

    Steven Novella
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:43 am
    Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott has just announced a new policy that will go into effect January 2016 – the “no jab, no pay” policy. Under this policy parents who refuse to vaccinate their children will lose tax exemptions for children. This could cost them up to $11,000 per year (I have also seen estimates of up to $15,000) per child. This new policy is reported to have bipartisan support and is supported by the Australian Medical Association. The new policy would not apply to medical exemptions or religious exemptions, but the latter is enforced as a very narrow…
  • Rolling Stone and Journalism Failure

    Steven Novella
    7 Apr 2015 | 5:10 am
    In November 2014 Rolling Stone magazine published an article called, “A Rape on Campus.” If you click on the link to that article today you are directed to another article on Rolling Stone: “A Rape on Campus,” What Went Wrong? This one article may have triggered two important conversations in our society. The first was to push forward the conversation on the problem of rape on college campuses. This is a real and serious issue, but as is often the case when a new social issue comes to prominence the basic facts have not been fully vetted and worked through. There are…
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • A Route To Evil: A Blank Slate or Determined Route

    Mayerzee
    14 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    When we want to know the stories of events that happen nationally and around the world we switch on the news. These news stories consist of Heroism, Politics, Tragedy, Health, Sports and Terrorism etc. More recently the story of the Boston Marathon Bombings is the latest chapter in the history of terror. I asked myself, as we all probably did “What makes a person do something like that?” and “How can someone be so evil?” But behind every news item whether it is heroic, stupid, or terrifying, the underlying reason for that story was that an individual or group demonstrated particular…
  • 5 Ways to Increasing Your Brain Power and Health

    Bob Choat
    13 Apr 2015 | 10:34 pm
    Imagine possessing the most powerful force in the universe. What would you do with it? What if you can make it even better? Guess what? You already possess it. It’s your brain. It has approximately 100 billion neurons and each one connects to between 10 and 10,000 other neurons. That would be equal to 10 to the 100 power or more than all the atoms in the universe. Neuroscience has advanced quite a bit over the last 10-20 years. We now know more about the brain than we’ve ever had in history. Part of that learning is that we know that our brains continue to grow throughout our…
  • ICYMI: Last Week was Podcast Week

    Raymond
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:56 pm
    … and I put out three separate podcasts from interviews I did with people presenting at PechaK
  • I can feel my mind going, said HAL

    Brick Wahl
    13 Apr 2015 | 5:42 pm
    One of the more fucked up things about a lifetime of epilepsy is that after a few decades of excess electro-chemical energy, faulty wiring, memory damage and fifty thousand or so pills you can feel the executive functions slipping away. I used to be extremely organized, now I’m growing slipshod. I use to be able to plan ahead. Now I catch myself winging it. I’m missing bill payments and having trouble budgeting. I lose track of the days, of the hours. I forget where I’m going, or what I’m supposed to do. I miss freeway exits. Forget names. Forget events. Forget what…
  • Tired of Working Out...then Think it Out

    Susan Ann Darley
    13 Apr 2015 | 5:42 pm
    The Incredible Power  of Your Thoughts Through neuroscience we’ve learned how our thoughts affect our brain – how it works and how it alters its physical structure and shape.  If through our thinking we have the ability to alter the brain then why not the other organs in the body? Many people have scoffed at the idea that our thoughts possess the power to change the world around us – be it our physical bodies or circumstances. Science is beginning to support the premise that they actually do. Mitchell Moffit and Greg Brown, creators of Asap SCIENCE YouTube Channel, tell…
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • Tau-Dependent Kv4.2 Depletion and Dendritic Hyperexcitability in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Hall, A. M., Throesch, B. T., Buckingham, S. C., Markwardt, S. J., Peng, Y., Wang, Q., Hoffman, D. A., Roberson, E. D.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Neuronal hyperexcitability occurs early in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and contributes to network dysfunction in AD patients. In other disorders with neuronal hyperexcitability, dysfunction in the dendrites often contributes, but dendritic excitability has not been directly examined in AD models. We used dendritic patch-clamp recordings to measure dendritic excitability in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. We found that dendrites, more so than somata, of hippocampal neurons were hyperexcitable in mice overexpressing Aβ. This dendritic hyperexcitability was associated…
  • The Upregulation of {alpha}2{delta}-1 Subunit Modulates Activity-Dependent Ca2+ Signals in Sensory Neurons

    D'Arco, M., Margas, W., Cassidy, J. S., Dolphin, A. C.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    As auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, the α2 proteins modulate membrane trafficking of the channels and their localization to specific presynaptic sites. Following nerve injury, upregulation of the α2-1 subunit in sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to the generation of chronic pain states; however, very little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we show that the increased expression of α2-1 in rat sensory neurons leads to prolonged Ca2+ responses evoked by membrane depolarization. This mechanism is coupled to CaV2.2…
  • Origin of Thoracic Spinal Network Activity during Locomotor-Like Activity in the Neonatal Rat

    Beliez, L., Barriere, G., Bertrand, S. S., Cazalets, J.-R.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Effective quadrupedal locomotor behaviors require the coordination of many muscles in the limbs, back, neck, and tail. Because of the spinal motoneuronal somatotopic organization, motor coordination implies interactions among distant spinal networks. Here, we investigated some of the interactions between the lumbar locomotor networks that control limb movements and the thoracic networks that control the axial muscles involved in trunk movement. For this purpose, we used an in vitro isolated newborn rat spinal cord (from T2 to sacrococcygeal) preparation. Using extracellular ventral root…
  • Modulation-Frequency-Specific Adaptation in Awake Auditory Cortex

    Malone, B. J., Beitel, R. E., Vollmer, M., Heiser, M. A., Schreiner, C. E.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Amplitude modulations are fundamental features of natural signals, including human speech and nonhuman primate vocalizations. Because natural signals frequently occur in the context of other competing signals, we used a forward-masking paradigm to investigate how the modulation context of a prior signal affects cortical responses to subsequent modulated sounds. Psychophysical "modulation masking," in which the presentation of a modulated "masker" signal elevates the threshold for detecting the modulation of a subsequent stimulus, has been interpreted as evidence of a central modulation…
  • Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Cortical Networks in Psychopathy

    Philippi, C. L., Pujara, M. S., Motzkin, J. C., Newman, J., Kiehl, K. A., Koenigs, M.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by callous antisocial behavior and criminal recidivism. Here we examine whether psychopathy is associated with alterations in functional connectivity in three large-scale cortical networks. Using fMRI in 142 adult male prison inmates, we computed resting-state functional connectivity using seeds from the default mode network, frontoparietal network, and cingulo-opercular network. To determine the specificity of our findings to these cortical networks, we also calculated functional connectivity using seeds from two comparison primary sensory…
 
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    The Brain Understanding Itself

  • Autism: Identifying the Biochemical Fingerprint

    Alex Doman
    31 Mar 2015 | 11:13 am
      A few years back I was introduced to a physician by a mutual friend, Kristin Selby Gonzales. Kristin is mom to Jaxson who is diagnosed with autism, and Chairman of Autism Hope Alliance , a non-profit doing great work in the field, and whose advisory board I proudly serve on. The three of us shared a panel discussion on autism treatment and recovery at the Natural Product Expo West. That doctor was Dan Rossignol, MD, FAAFP, FMAP. After hearing his personal story as a father with two children with autism, who switched from a family medical practice to biomedical research and treatment to…
  • BREAD HEAD: How do we prevent America’s most feared disease?

    Alex Doman
    3 Mar 2015 | 9:09 am
    Filmmaker and media personality Max Lugavere recently crushed his $75,000 goal on kickstarter, raising over $130,000 to produce a first of it’s kind documentary that explores the impact of our diets and lifestyles on brain health. Based on the results of his fundraising efforts with 1,748 backers including myself, I’d say people want to see BREAD HEAD: How do we prevent America’s most feared disease come to fruition. Because changes in the brain begin decades before Alzheimer’s symptoms, the absolute best way we can move the needle on this disease is through minimizing…
  • Neuroscience, Personalized Medicine and Faith

    Alex Doman
    18 Feb 2015 | 4:29 pm
    Did you catch my discussion with neurologist Jay Lombard on The Listening Program® Radio a couple weeks ago? It was a fascinating conversation. And, you can enjoy the podcast here. About the program Neuroscience provides amazing insights into the complex biology of the human brain, but can it do more? Is neuroscience also a gateway to inner being? And, can there be common ground between neuroscience and faith that are not mutually exclusive?  Both science and religion seek truth and meaning, and Dr. Jay Lombard postulates that science plus faith equals consciousness. In this episode of TLP…
  • Music, the Brain and Therapeutic Results

    Alex Doman
    6 Jan 2015 | 3:55 pm
      It’s a New Year and time for the first episode of The Listening Program® Radio for 2015! And, I’m elated to share that Dr. Concetta M. Tomaino will be my guest tomorrow, Wednesday, January 7th from 8:00-9:00 PM Eastern to discuss Music, the Brain and Therapeutic Results. Dr. Tomaino is executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function and is internationally known for her research in the clinical applications of music and neurologic rehabilitation including decades of clinical work with the acclaimed neurologist and best-selling author Dr. Oliver…
  • Psychoacoustic Music

    Alex Doman
    4 Dec 2014 | 8:23 am
    Alex Doman:I found this to be an interesting and in-depth review of our Sleep Genius mobile apps which emphasizes the strength of the collaboration between the creators of our novel sleep technology. Originally posted on thedeadscientificwriterssocietyreviews: by: Wan It’s not hard to miss the days when we get to wake up whenever we want, refreshed and relaxed in bed while a warm and soft blanket covers you. Nowadays, the first thing that greets us when we wake is our own blaring alarm, reminding us to get ready to go to school or work, and we would get up, stumbling and staggering about,…
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    Brain Posts

  • Twin Studies in ADHD: Research Links

    17 Apr 2015 | 8:17 am
    Twin studies provide a strong research study design in understanding the genetics of a variety of brain conditions.This is true for understanding the genetics of ADHD.Here are a few selected recent twin studies in ADHD that I think are important and noteworthy.Readers can access the abstract and in some cases the free full-text manuscript by clicking on the title.Shared Features of ADHD and AutismThis study featured results of an analysis of over 17000 adult twins from Sweden. The authors examined scores on two features of autism (social/communication and repetitive/restricted behavior) and…
  • What is Neurofeedback Training for ADHD?

    16 Apr 2015 | 7:32 am
    There are a variety of behavioral strategies for treating the attention and activity components of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).One of these strategies is known as neurofeedback. A recent study in the journal Pediatrics found evidence for effectiveness of in-school neurofeedback for ADHD in a randomized controlled trial.In this trial, 104 children between the ages of 7 and 11 years of age were randomized to one of three research arms: in-school neurofeedback, cognitive therapy and control condition.Subject children in the study received a supervised 45 minute…
  • Treating Insomnia in Children with ADHD

    13 Apr 2015 | 7:22 am
    Insomnia commonly complicates the clinical presentation and treatment in children with ADHD.Stimulant therapy may provide significant relief for daytime attention and hyperactivity symptoms. However, stimulants do not appear to help with comorbid insomnia. In fact, stimulant therapy may cause more problems with insomnia in ADHD.Behavioral treatments are known to be effective in children without ADHD. Now we have a recently published study showing the effectiveness of behavioral treatment of insomnia in children with ADHD.Harriet Hiscock and colleagues from Australia conducted a randomized…
  • ADHD Clinical Trial Research: Reading Links

    10 Apr 2015 | 7:10 am
    In the upcoming week I will be reviewing a few recent clinical trials in ADHD.Here are a few of the studies that caught my eye as recent and important research.Clicking on the title will take you to the research abstract and for some studies a link to the free full-text manuscript.Behavioral treatment for sleep problems in children with ADHDSleep problems are a common contributing factor to the clinical profile in ADHD. In this study, 244 children with ADHD received a standard behavioral intervention target at sleep hygiene. Children receiving the sleep intervention had improved ADHD symptoms…
  • Brain Volume Differences in ADHD Normalize By Adulthood

    9 Apr 2015 | 7:35 am
    Brain volume differences in ADHD have been documented in some childhood studies.ADHD symptoms diminish with maturation in many but not all individuals. It is unclear whether this improvement in symptoms is also related to maturation of brain regions.A recent study from the Netherlands provides some answers on this issue. A. Marten H. Onnink and colleagues performed a structural MRI study of 119 adults with ADHD compared to a group of controls.This study is important because it examined effects of gender, comorbid depression and treatment history on key brain regions including the basal…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • Tylenol Numbs Emotions, New Study Finds

    Google News - Health
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:06 am
    Source: Google News - HealthA new study is stating that painkillers are doing a lot more than dulling physical pain, they're numbing your emotions as well. The study, that was published in Psychological Science, included Tylenol as well as other over-the-counter acetaminophen...
  • Fatal Brain Disease in U.S. Man Likely Came from British Beef

    Yahoo News - Science
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:06 am
    Source: Yahoo News - ScienceA U.S. man who developed a rare and fatal brain disease likely got the disease from eating beef while living abroad more than a decade earlier, according to a new report of the case. Because the condition, known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is so rare, the man was misdiagnosed and even hospitalized for psychiatric symptoms multiple times before doctors suspected the true cause of his symptoms, according to the report from researchers at...
  • Eight Nutrients to Protect the Aging Brain

    ScienceDaily
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:04 am
    Source: ScienceDailyBrain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers write about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.
  • Complex Cognition Shaped the Stone Age Hand Axe

    ScienceDaily
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:04 am
    Source: ScienceDailyThe ability to make a Lower Paleolithic hand axe depends on complex cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex, including the 'central executive' function of working memory, a new study finds. The results knock another chip off theories that Stone Age hand axes are simple tools that don't involve higher-order executive function of the brain.
  • A Sniff of Happiness: Chemicals in Sweat May Convey Positive Emotion

    ScienceDaily
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:03 am
    Source: ScienceDailyHumans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that we produce chemical compounds, or chemosignals, when we experience happiness that are detectable by others who smell our sweat.
 
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    The Neurocritic

  • Trends in Cognitive, Computational, and Systems Neuroscience 2015

    15 Apr 2015 | 1:46 am
    What are the Hot Topics in cognitive neuroscience? We could ask these people, or we could take a more populist approach by looking at conference abstracts. I consulted the program for the recent Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting (CNS 2015) and made a word cloud using Wordle.1 For comparison, we'll examine the program for the most recent Computational and Systems Neuroscience meeting (Cosyne 2015).CNS is all about memory, people, and cognitive processing.Cosyne is about neurons, models, and neural activity.Word cloud for the 2015 CNS ProgramWord cloud for the 2015 Cosyne ProgramCosyne is…
  • Cognitive Neuroscience 2015: State of the Union

    6 Apr 2015 | 1:46 am
    What can we do to solve the mind/body problem once and for all? How do we cure devastating brain diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, and depression? I am steadfast in following the course of my 500 year plan that may eventually solve these pressing issues, to the benefit of all Americans!There's nothing like attending a conference in the midst of a serious family illness to make one take stock of what's important. My mind/brain has been elsewhere lately, along with my body in a different location. My blogging output has declined while I live in this alternate reality. But…
  • Follow #CNS2015

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Whether or not you're in sunny San Francisco for the start of Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting today, you can follow Nick Wan's list of conference attendees on Twitter: @nickwan/#CNS2015. There's also the #CNS2015 hashtag, and the official @CogNeuroNews account. Nick will also be blogging from the conference at True Brain. You may see a post or two from The Neurocritic, but I'm usually not very prompt about it. Please comment if you'll be blogging too.Two of the program highlights are today: Keynote Address, Anjan Chatterjee: “The neuroscience of aesthetics and art”2015…
  • Update on the BROADEN Trial of DBS for Treatment-Resistant Depression

    16 Mar 2015 | 2:33 am
    Website for the BROADEN™ study, which was terminatedIn these days of irrational exuberance about neural circuit models, it's wise to remember the limitations of current deep brain stimulation (DBS) methods to treat psychiatric disorders. If you recall (from Dec. 2013), Neurotech Business Report revealed that "St. Jude Medical failed a futility analysis of its BROADEN trial of DBS for treatment of depression..."A recent comment on my old post about the BROADEN Trial1 had an even more pessimistic revelation: there was only a 17.2% chance of a successful study outcome:Regarding Anonymous'…
  • Daylight Savings Time and "The Dress"

    9 Mar 2015 | 8:42 pm
    もう何番煎じかも分からないけど例のドレス問題をまとめてみました。青黒/白金に見える人の色覚やモニタを疑ってる人はぜひご覧ください。 pic.twitter.com/6euNYw9xUa— ぶどう茶 (@budoucha) February 27, 2015Could one's chronotype (degree of "morningness" vs. "eveningness") be related to your membership on Team white/gold vs. Team blue/black?Dreaded by night owls everywhere, Daylight Savings Time forces us to get up an hour earlier. Yes, [my time to blog and] I have been living under a rock, but this evil event and an old tweet…
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    The Neurocritic

  • Trends in Cognitive, Computational, and Systems Neuroscience 2015

    The Neurocritic
    15 Apr 2015 | 1:46 am
    What are the Hot Topics in cognitive neuroscience? We could ask these people, or we could take a more populist approach by looking at conference abstracts. I consulted the program for the recent Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting (CNS 2015) and made a word cloud using Wordle.1 For comparison, we'll examine the program for the most recent Computational and Systems Neuroscience meeting (Cosyne 2015).CNS is all about memory, people, and cognitive processing.Cosyne is about neurons, models, and neural activity.Word cloud for the 2015 CNS ProgramWord cloud for the 2015 Cosyne ProgramCosyne is…
  • Cognitive Neuroscience 2015: State of the Union

    The Neurocritic
    6 Apr 2015 | 1:46 am
    What can we do to solve the mind/body problem once and for all? How do we cure devastating brain diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, and depression? I am steadfast in following the course of my 500 year plan that may eventually solve these pressing issues, to the benefit of all Americans!There's nothing like attending a conference in the midst of a serious family illness to make one take stock of what's important. My mind/brain has been elsewhere lately, along with my body in a different location. My blogging output has declined while I live in this alternate reality. But…
  • Follow #CNS2015

    The Neurocritic
    28 Mar 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Whether or not you're in sunny San Francisco for the start of Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting today, you can follow Nick Wan's list of conference attendees on Twitter: @nickwan/#CNS2015. There's also the #CNS2015 hashtag, and the official @CogNeuroNews account. Nick will also be blogging from the conference at True Brain. You may see a post or two from The Neurocritic, but I'm usually not very prompt about it. Please comment if you'll be blogging too.Two of the program highlights are today: Keynote Address, Anjan Chatterjee: “The neuroscience of aesthetics and art”2015…
  • Update on the BROADEN Trial of DBS for Treatment-Resistant Depression

    The Neurocritic
    16 Mar 2015 | 2:33 am
    Website for the BROADEN™ study, which was terminatedIn these days of irrational exuberance about neural circuit models, it's wise to remember the limitations of current deep brain stimulation (DBS) methods to treat psychiatric disorders. If you recall (from Dec. 2013), Neurotech Business Report revealed that "St. Jude Medical failed a futility analysis of its BROADEN trial of DBS for treatment of depression..."A recent comment on my old post about the BROADEN Trial1 had an even more pessimistic revelation: there was only a 17.2% chance of a successful study outcome:Regarding Anonymous'…
  • Daylight Savings Time and "The Dress"

    The Neurocritic
    9 Mar 2015 | 8:42 pm
    もう何番煎じかも分からないけど例のドレス問題をまとめてみました。青黒/白金に見える人の色覚やモニタを疑ってる人はぜひご覧ください。 pic.twitter.com/6euNYw9xUa— ぶどう茶 (@budoucha) February 27, 2015Could one's chronotype (degree of "morningness" vs. "eveningness") be related to your membership on Team white/gold vs. Team blue/black?Dreaded by night owls everywhere, Daylight Savings Time forces us to get up an hour earlier. Yes, [my time to blog and] I have been living under a rock, but this evil event and an old tweet…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • Recent Studies on the Role of Sleep

    Bruno Dubuc
    13 Apr 2015 | 8:06 am
    As Evan Thompson, a philosopher of biology and the mind, stated in a recent lecture, our Western way of life is so focused on productivity as a dominant value that when we go to bed, we are so exhausted that we literally “crash” into sleep. As a result, we very often do not even experience the special state of consciousness known as hypnagogia, which normally occurs during the first phase of falling asleep. When someone is in this state, they are still sensitive to sensory inputs from the outside world, but no longer entirely awake, and they are more likely to make all sorts of original…
  • Is There an Evolutionary Continuity between Spatial Navigation and Declarative Memory?

    Bruno Dubuc
    30 Mar 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Sometimes someone comes up with a hypothesis whose parts fit together so neatly that it seems amazing that no one has ever thought of it before. A good example is the hypothesis proposed by György Buzsáki and Edvard Moser in the January 2013 issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, where they propose that there is an evolutionary continuity between the cognitive processes that we use to orient ourselves in space and and the mechanisms that underlie our declarative memory. Central to this hypothesis is the hippocampus, a brain structure that has long been known to contribute to the storage…
  • The “Coming Out” of the Electrical Synapse

    Bruno Dubuc
    14 Mar 2015 | 2:17 pm
    The first living organisms composed of more than one cell first appeared on Earth slightly over 3 billion years ago. Once they did, the need arose for all of the cells in each organism to co-ordinate their efforts toward a single goal: the survival of the organism as a whole. To do so, these cells began secreting molecules that, by binding to the surface of other cells, informed them about what was happening elsewhere in the organism. That, in short, is the origin not only of the human hormonal system but also of human synapses: the connections between nerve cells. In general, when people…
  • How Posture Can Affect the Brain

    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Feb 2015 | 10:55 am
    For decades now, scientists have had a good knowledge of the descending neural and hormonal pathways by which the human brain influences the human body. But until quite recently, there was still a tendency to underestimate just how much the human body influences the human brain. In an experiment reported in 2010, however, social psychologist Amy Cuddy showed that simply adopting a body posture associated with dominance will, within two minutes, cause measurable changes in people’s blood concentrations of certain hormones, and in certain of their behaviours, such as risk-taking. As Cuddy…
  • Famous Amnesia Patient “K.C.” Dies

    Bruno Dubuc
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:20 am
    He was almost as famous as Henri Molaison, the famous patient “H.M.” who was studied for decades by eminent researchers such as neuropsychologist Brenda Milner, in Montreal, and who died in 2008. Patient “K.C.”, whose real name was Kent Cochrane, died more recently, on March 27, 2014, at the age of 62. K.C. grew up in the suburbs of Toronto. Unlike H.M., who had had his two hippocampi surgically removed because of epilepsy, K.C. suffered serious damage to his brain, including both hippocampi, in a motorcycle accident on his way home from work, at the age of 30. But like H.M, K.C.
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    Your Brain Health

  • The Brain’s Way of Healing – April Walking Book Club

    Sarah McKay
    5 Apr 2015 | 4:38 am
    As I mentioned a couple of weeks ago, I’ve been reading Norman Doidge’s latest book ‘The Brain’s Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity.‘ Doidge’s first book, The Brain That Change’s Itself, has become one of the most popular science books around describing the phenomenon of neuroplasticity, and was largely responsible […] The post The Brain’s Way of Healing – April Walking Book Club appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • What actually IS neuroplasticity?

    Sarah McKay
    28 Mar 2015 | 7:27 pm
    Last weekend I flew home to New Zealand for an old friend’s 40th birthday (life is too short not to celebrate, right?).  At Sydney airport I picked up Norman Doidge’s latest book ‘The Brain’s Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity.‘ I’m reading it with my usual healthy dose of […] The post What actually IS neuroplasticity? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Gut-Brain Health – What Neuroscientists Are Calling “A Paradigm Shift”

    Sarah McKay
    5 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    The trillions of microbes that inhabit your body are collectively called the microbiome. They outnumber your own cells ten to one and weigh up to twice weight of the average human brain. Most of them live in your gut and intestines, where they help to digest food, synthesise vitamins and ward off infection. The microbiome has […] The post Gut-Brain Health – What Neuroscientists Are Calling “A Paradigm Shift” appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Three evidence-based daily habits for wellbeing and happiness

    Sarah McKay
    23 Feb 2015 | 7:55 pm
    This week I spoke with Megan McDonough CEO and co-founder along with Dr. Tal Ben-Shahar of the Wholebeing Institute. Megan is here in Australia working with Justin Robinson the director of the Institute of Positive Education at Geelong Grammar School. They’re promoting the Australian version of the Certificate in Whole-Person Positive Psychology (CiPP). Which by the […] The post Three evidence-based daily habits for wellbeing and happiness appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Did Rick Hanson’s Positive Neuroplasticity training change my skeptical mind?

    Sarah McKay
    9 Feb 2015 | 10:07 pm
    See that photo over there to the right?  That’s me and Rick Hanson PhD, a neuropsychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author of the books Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence  and Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love and Wisdom. Rick […] The post Did Rick Hanson’s Positive Neuroplasticity training change my skeptical mind? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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