Neuroscience

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  • Study Identifies Neurons That Help Predict What Another Individual Will Do

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:31 pm
    A new study reports researchers have identified two groups of neurons which appear to play key roles in social interaction.
  • The neurochemistry of music.

    Deric's MindBlog
    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    I want to point to an interesting review article by Chanda and Levitin, that summaries studies showing how music engages four of our bodies' fundamental neurochemical systems. I pass on the abstract and the start of the introduction to the article to give you an idea of its scope: Music is used to regulate mood and arousal in everyday life and to promote physical and psychological health and well-being in clinical settings. However, scientific inquiry into the neurochemical effects of music is still in its infancy. In this review, we evaluate the evidence that music improves health and…
  • How Posture Can Affect the Brain

    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level
    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Feb 2015 | 10:55 am
    For decades now, scientists have had a good knowledge of the descending neural and hormonal pathways by which the human brain influences the human body. But until quite recently, there was still a tendency to underestimate just how much the human body influences the human brain. In an experiment reported in 2010, however, social psychologist Amy Cuddy showed that simply adopting a body posture associated with dominance will, within two minutes, cause measurable changes in people’s blood concentrations of certain hormones, and in certain of their behaviours, such as risk-taking. As Cuddy…
  • Scientists discover part of brain that calculates the intentions of others

    Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today
    28 Feb 2015 | 12:00 am
    Scientists mapping monkeys' brains during tasks that require complex social anticipation believe their discovery could lead to treatments for autism and similar problems.
  • Left or Right? The Brain Knows Before You Move

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:48 pm
    A new study reports researchers have identified a neural circuit which connects motor planning to movement.
 
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • New compounds protect nervous system from the structural damage characteristic of multiple sclerosis

    27 Feb 2015 | 3:10 pm
    A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study. Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the brain and spinal cord, where for unknown reasons, the body's immune system begins an inflammatory attack against myelin, the protective nerve coating that surrounds nerve fibers. Once myelin is stripped from these fibers, the nerve cells become highly susceptible to damage, which is believed to underlie their destruction, leading to the steady clinical decline seen in progressive…
  • Reviving drugs with anti-stroke potential, minus side effects

    27 Feb 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Scientists have found NMDA receptor antagonists that can limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke, apparently without the pronounced side effects seen with similar drugs. Now researchers have found a potential path around this obstacle, they report.
  • Enhancing studies on a possible blood biomarker for traumatic brain injury

    27 Feb 2015 | 10:09 am
    New technology could help advance blood biomarker capabilities for improved diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). An estimated 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury each year, and an estimated 5.3 million individuals -- approximately two percent of the U.S. population -- are living with disability as a result of TBI. Traumatic brain injuries can occur from even the slightest bump or blow to the head.
  • Study challenges theory on unconscious memory system in the brain

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:27 am
    A long-accepted scientific theory about the role the hippocampus plays in our unconscious memory is being challenged by new research. For decades, scientists have theorized that this part of the brain is not involved in processing unconscious memory, the type that allows us to do things like button a shirt without having to think about it.
  • Left or right? The brain knows before you move

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:24 am
    A neural circuit that connects motor planning to movement has been identified by researchers. The study, the researchers say, explains why injuries that disrupt the brain's ability to carry out movement planning typically impair a person's ability to make movements on just one side of his or her body.
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    MIT News - Neuroscience

  • New strategies for anesthesia

    Elizabeth Dougherty | MIT Spectrum
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:33 pm
    In operating rooms around the world, machines attached to anesthetized patients blip and bleep, reporting second-by-second accounts of vital organs. Blood circulation and respiration are closely monitored, but the one organ that is drugged, the brain, has no readout. Anesthesiologists simply watch for signs of wakening, says Emery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at MIT. Brown, who won a 2007 National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award to study how anesthesia drugs work, hopes to change that. Stat. Anesthesia drugs have…
  • Decoding sugar addiction

    Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    29 Jan 2015 | 9:00 am
    Together, obesity and Type 2 diabetes rank among our nation’s greatest health problem, and they largely result from what many call an “addiction” to sugar. But solving this problem is more complicated than solving drug addiction, because it requires reducing the drive to eat unhealthy foods without affecting the desire to eat healthy foods when hungry. In a new paper in Cell, neuroscientists at MIT have untangled these two processes in mice and shown that inhibiting a previously unknown brain circuit that regulates compulsive sugar consumption does not interfere with healthy eating.
  • MIT researchers find where visual memories are made

    Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    20 Jan 2015 | 11:09 am
    In findings that may lead to new treatments for cognitive disorders, researchers at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory zero in on how the brain forms memories of what has been seen. In a paper appearing this week in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience, a research team led by Mark Bear, the Picower Professor of Neuroscience, showed that dramatic changes occur in the primary visual cortex when mice learn to distinguish novel from familiar visual stimuli. Manipulations that prevented the changes in visual cortex also blocked memory formation. Impairments in detecting and…
  • New fibers can deliver many simultaneous stimuli

    David L. Chandler | MIT News Office
    19 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study — not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously. Conventional neural probes are designed to record a single type of signaling, limiting the information that can be derived from the brain at any point in time. Now researchers at MIT may have found a way to change that. By producing complex multimodal fibers that could be less than the width of a hair, they have created a system that could deliver optical signals and drugs directly into the brain, along with…
  • MIT team enlarges brain samples, making them easier to image

    Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
    15 Jan 2015 | 11:00 am
    Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of so-called “super-resolution” microscopes can see inside cells with resolution better than 250 nanometers. A team of researchers from MIT has now taken a novel approach to gaining such high-resolution images: Instead of making their microscopes more powerful, they have discovered a method that enlarges tissue samples by embedding them in a polymer that swells when water is added. This allows…
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Weekend Diversion: Spock and the legacy of Star Trek (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    1 Mar 2015 | 3:25 pm
    “An ancestor of mine maintained that when you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” -Mr. Spock, Star Trek Sometimes the truth is hard to handle on its own, so we resort to fiction to make it a little easier to swallow. Have a listen to Summer Fiction’s song, By The Sea, while you consider one of the greatest “fictions” we’ve ever told ourselves to do exactly that: Star Trek. Image credit: Star Trek fan art, via https://nasimali.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/film-star-trek-should-not-follow-guardians-of-the-galaxy/. In many…
  • Sunday Chess Problem [EvolutionBlog]

    jrosenhouse
    1 Mar 2015 | 12:44 pm
    One of the underappreciated aspects of chess composition is that some problems have a sense of humor. Sure, the real classics show deep and surprising ideas and do so with impressive constructional finesse. But other problems just bring a smile to your face. This week I have two such problems for you. Neither is difficult to solve. In fact, they are both trivial to solve. But both made me smile when I saw them, and that makes them good problems in my book! Last week I reported on The US Amateur Team East chess tournament. One of the great joys of this tournament is the chess bookstore run by…
  • New Research Demonstrates Link Between Greenhouse Gas Pollution and Global Warming [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    1 Mar 2015 | 9:50 am
    New Research on the Effects of CO2 Pollution A paper just published in Nature reports on the direct measurement of the effects of human greenhouse gas pollution on the heating of the Earth’s atmosphere. This is empirical verification of anthropogenic global warming. Since the Industrial Revolution, when humans started polluting the Earth’s atmosphere with copious amounts of long lived greenhouse gases released from entombment as fossil fuels, the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere has skyrocketed from close to 250 parts per million (ppm) to about 400ppm. In fact, February was the first month…
  • Ownership of the Means of Adjudication [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    1 Mar 2015 | 5:59 am
    Back on Thursday when I was waiting to be annoyed by a speech, one of the ways I passed time was reading stuff on my phone, which included This Grantland piece about Charles Barkley and “advanced stats”. In it, Bryan Curtis makes the argument that while Barkley’s recent comments disparaging statistical tools seem at first like just the same old innumeracy, it’s really a question of ownership. But Barkley was firing a shot in a second war. Let’s call it Moneyball II. This clash doesn’t pit a blogger versus a newspaperman in a debate over the value of PER. It pits…
  • Lents: Caius and Christ’s [Stoat]

    William M. Connolley
    28 Feb 2015 | 2:16 pm
    Alas, I missed Caius retaking the Men’s headship on Thursday, mostly because I didn’t think it would happen (they were nowhere on Wednesday) but partly because I was bag-carrying for King’s, who rewarded me with an exciting bump on (LoL)Catz and ensuing chaos; and on Christ’s on Friday. But I did see Christ’s take the Women’s headship from Emma, somewhat to my surprise, though Kate says they listen to her. Anyway, here it is: (it doesn’t happen till 4:40, do feel free to skip ahead).
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    Deric's MindBlog

  • The neurochemistry of music.

    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    I want to point to an interesting review article by Chanda and Levitin, that summaries studies showing how music engages four of our bodies' fundamental neurochemical systems. I pass on the abstract and the start of the introduction to the article to give you an idea of its scope: Music is used to regulate mood and arousal in everyday life and to promote physical and psychological health and well-being in clinical settings. However, scientific inquiry into the neurochemical effects of music is still in its infancy. In this review, we evaluate the evidence that music improves health and…
  • Twitter predicts mortality from heart disease!

    26 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    Here is an interesting item from Eichstaedt, Seligman, and collaborators: Hostility and chronic stress are known risk factors for heart disease, but they are costly to assess on a large scale. We used language expressed on Twitter to characterize community-level psychological correlates of age-adjusted mortality from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD). Language patterns reflecting negative social relationships, disengagement, and negative emotions—especially anger—emerged as risk factors; positive emotions and psychological engagement emerged as protective factors. Most correlations…
  • Metacognitive mechanisms underlying lucid dreaming.

    25 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    Metacognition is the ability to observe, reflect on, and report one's own mental states during wakefulness. Dreaming is not typically accessible to this kind of monitoring, except in people who are lucid dreamers, aware that they are dreaming while in the sleep state (I can do this). Filevich et al. have looked for relationships between the neural correlates of lucid dreaming and thought monitoring: Lucid dreaming is a state of awareness that one is dreaming, without leaving the sleep state. Dream reports show that self-reflection and volitional control are more pronounced in lucid compared…
  • The neuroscience of motivated cognition.

    24 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    I want to point to this interesting open source article by Hughes and Zaki, who review research from social psychology and cognitive neuroscience that provides insight into the structure of motivated cognition (that can bias or distort reality), suggesting that it pervades information processing and is often effortless. Here are the opening paragraphs: People often believe that their thinking aims squarely at gaining an accurate impression of reality. Upon closer inspection, this assumption collapses. Instead, like the inhabitants of Garrison Keillor's Lake Woebegon, individuals often see…
  • MindBlog's 9th anniversary

    23 Feb 2015 | 6:11 am
    I realize that I have let MindBlog's 9th birthday slip past without note. The Feb. 6, 2006 post that started the blog, Dangerous Ideas, is no less relevant today than then. I don't pay attention to statistics, but the Blogger platform automatically reports that 200-500 actively engage a given post, with that number rising to to 500-1000 over the next several weeks. Feedburner reports ~ 1.6 million views of ~3,000 posts since MindBlog started. I don't have a sense of how many people make checking MindBlog posts a daily ritual. (A brief comment to this post on your use, as well as any critique,…
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    Brain Blogger

  • Nurturing The Brain – Part II, Chocolate

    Sara Adaes, PhD (c)
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:44 pm
    Chocolate refers to anything that is made from cacao beans. The word “chocolate” has been etymologically traced to the Aztec word “xocoatl,” which referred to a bitter drink brewed from cacao. It’s thought to have been cultivated by different cultures in central and south America for at least 3,000 years. The scientific name for cacao was given by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1753, when he published his book Species Plantarum. Linnaeus must have loved chocolate for he named it Theobroma cacao, meaning “food of the gods” in Latin.
  • Living with Schizoaffective Disorder – A Personal Story

    G.H. Francis
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Being diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder was a real blow. I felt alone. I felt helpless. I felt my life had ended. I can’t tell you how many times I sat in a bathtub staring at the vein in my arm, wondering how much it would hurt to cut through the skin, or how frightened I’d become of heights, knowing that my suicidal thoughts might one day get the best of me. For years I continued to live as I had prior to my diagnosis: drinking, doing drugs, eating poorly, and not exercising. Finally, after my third manic hospitalization, I was struck with a realization: I have to learn to live…
  • Collective Memory – Without WWIII Could Obama Be Forgotten?

    Carla Clark, PhD
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Washington, Lincoln, Wilson, Roosevelt, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Nixon, I hate to shamefully admit, are the only American presidents from before the 1980s for whom I could recall their rough chronological place in American history. Considering that I am from Scotland, and have never studied American history, I guess that’s not too bad, right? Well, to my surprise there were striking similarities between the key presidents I recalled and a recent study that probed the collective memory of Americans, entitled, Forgetting the Presidents. The study tested the memory of college students and a…
  • The Determiner Wars

    Ben Ambridge, PhD
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    A and The: almost certainly the least interesting words in the English language; and quite possibly the least useful as well. In fact, many languages manage perfectly well without them (which is why – for example – Russian learners of English often struggle with them). Nonetheless, these two little words – which linguists call “determiners” – have been at the centre of one of the hardest battles ever fought in the cognitive sciences. Nobody alive has more citations than Noam Chomsky of MIT. Why? In the late 1950s, Chomsky came up with the idea of “Universal Grammar”.
  • Brains Aren’t Fooled By Virtual Reality

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    The scenes and the environments in World of Warcraft games appear so real that, for a moment, you forget you are staring at the screen. Technology has advanced so much that we can not only recreate reality but also engage with it. But however real the virtual may seem, the brain knows the difference! According to the recently published findings, the neurons in the brain react differently when they perceive a virtual environment than when they are in the real world. The GPS Cells in Our Brains The clue to the brain’s varied responses to different environments lies in the…
 
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    Mind Hacks

  • Actually, still no good explanation of ‘that dress’

    vaughanbell
    28 Feb 2015 | 2:12 am
    The last time I almost went blind staring at “that dress” was thanks to Liz Hurley and on this occasion I find myself equally unsatisfied. I’ll spare you the introduction about the amazing blue/black or white/gold dress. But what’s left me rather disappointed are the numerous ‘science of the dress’ articles that have appeared everywhere and say they’ve explained the effect through colour constancy. Firstly, this doesn’t explain what we want to know – which is why people differ in their perceptions, and secondly, I don’t think colour…
  • Spike activity 28-02-2015

    vaughanbell
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:06 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Nautilus magazine has a good piece on behavioural economics and rethinking ‘nudges’. Although the rethink is really just another form of standard ‘nudge’. The biggest hedge fund in the world, the $165 billion Bridgewater, starts an AI team to help give it the edge on investments reports Bloomberg. Well, they couldn’t get much worse than humans. Gizmodo reports that a neuroscientist says he’ll do a head transplant ‘real soon now’. Hungover neuroscientist reads Gizmodo, thinks ‘I said…
  • The smart unconscious

    tomstafford
    23 Feb 2015 | 12:27 am
    We feel that we are in control when our brains figure out puzzles or read words, says Tom Stafford, but a new experiment shows just how much work is going on underneath the surface of our conscious minds. It is a common misconception that we know our own minds. As I move around the world, walking and talking, I experience myself thinking thoughts. “What shall I have for lunch?”, I ask myself. Or I think, “I wonder why she did that?” and try and figure it out. It is natural to assume that this experience of myself is a complete report of my mind. It is natural, but…
  • Spike activity 20-02-2015

    vaughanbell
    22 Feb 2015 | 6:52 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Interesting social mapping using subway journey data from Beijing reproted in New Scientist. BPS Research Digest has compiled a comprehensive list of mind, brain and behaviour podcasts. That study finding a surge of p values just below 0.05 in psychology, probably not a sign of bad science, reports Daniel Lakens with a new analysis. The Toronto Star reports that psychologists terminated a study on implanting false crime memories early due to over-effectiveness. Why do mirrors seem to reverse left and right but not up or down? Clear…
  • Anti-vax: wrong but not irrational

    tomstafford
    19 Feb 2015 | 8:40 am
    Since the uptick in outbreaks of measles in the US, those arguing for the right not to vaccinate their children have come under increasing scrutiny. There is no journal of “anti-vax psychology” reporting research on those who advocate what seems like a controversial, “anti-science” and dangerous position, but if there was we can take a good guess at what the research reported therein would say. Look at other groups who hold beliefs at odds with conventional scientific thought. Climate sceptics for example. You might think that climate sceptics would be likely to be more ignorant of…
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    28 Feb 2015 | 9:56 am
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Glowing 'tattoo' captures 3D snapshot of brain activity, NewScientist In The Popular Press: Mothers’ Sounds Are Building Block for Babies’ Brains, New York Times Well Blog Outing A.I.: Beyond the Turing Test, New York Times...
  • Our 10th Blogiversary!

    Adam Kolber
    27 Feb 2015 | 11:49 pm
    The Neuroethics & Law Blog turns ten years old today. It was the first blog dedicated to the legal and ethical issues raised by advances in neuroscience (that I know of). Back then most people had never even heard of...
  • "PTSD in the Prison System"

    NELB Staff
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:34 pm
    Recently published in SSRN: "PTSD in the Prison System" JULIE ANN DAVIS, Texas Tech University School of Law The treatment of Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder in the federal prison system has fallen in quality, if it can ever be...
  • "Happiness 101 for Legal Scholars: Applying Happiness Research to Legal Policy, Ethics, Mindfulness, Negotiations, Legal Education, and Legal Practice"

    NELB Staff
    26 Feb 2015 | 3:32 pm
    Recently published in SSRN (and forthcoming in Research Handbook of Behavioral Law and Economics, Kathryn Zeiler & Joshua C. Teitelbaum eds. (2015)): "Happiness 101 for Legal Scholars: Applying Happiness Research to Legal Policy, Ethics, Mindfulness, Negotiations, Legal Education, and Legal...
  • "The Emergence of Law and Behavioural Science: A European Perspective"

    NELB Staff
    26 Feb 2015 | 11:32 am
    Recently published in SSRN (and forthcoming in A. Alemanno and Anne-Lise Sibony, Nudge and the Law: A European Perspective, Hart Publishing, (2015)): "The Emergence of Law and Behavioural Science: A European Perspective" ANNE-LISE SIBONY, Université de Liège ALBERTO ALEMANNO, HEC...
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    Neuromarketing

  • Be Awesome, from First Impression to Last, and More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:47 am
    This weeks picks include the science of first impressions, how to be someone people want to talk to, when to use rounded prices, and lots more! The post Be Awesome, from First Impression to Last, and More – Roger’s Picks appeared first on Neuromarketing.
  • How To Set The Right Price Every Time

    Roger Dooley
    18 Feb 2015 | 10:26 am
    Exactly how to price products is a big challenge for marketers, but new research provides valuable direction in this complex decision-making process. It isn’t just “big picture” pricing, like establishing margins and an overall price point, that bedevils marketers. There [...] The post How To Set The Right Price Every Time appeared first on Neuromarketing.
  • Junk Science of Wine, Most Hated (But Effective) Ad, More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    6 Feb 2015 | 6:41 am
    Wine-tasting is proven to be junk science, and there's a marketing lesson for all products and companies. Also, my newest from Forbes, latest podcasts, etc. The post Junk Science of Wine, Most Hated (But Effective) Ad, More – Roger’s Picks appeared first on Neuromarketing.
  • Brainfluence Podcast – Episodes 31 to 40

    Roger Dooley
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:01 am
    Another couple of months and we’ve got ten more episodes of The Brainfluence Podcast with awesome guests like Paul Zak, Dan Pink, and Robin Dreeke, the FBI’s former top behaviorist! Here’s your chance to catch up on any you missed. [...] The post Brainfluence Podcast – Episodes 31 to 40 appeared first on Neuromarketing.
  • Here’s Why Smart Marketers Use A/B Testing

    Roger Dooley
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:19 am
    How often are websites designed using “best practices” or by trusting the experience of a seasoned expert? The answer is, “all too frequently.” In every speech I give, I offer practical advice on how to get better marketing results by [...] The post Here’s Why Smart Marketers Use A/B Testing appeared first on Neuromarketing.
 
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    SharpBrains

  • Next in Human Resources: Tracking brain games data to measure cognitive and emotional traits?

    SharpBrains
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:04 am
    Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data (NPR): “People have always wanted to find a way to assess someone’s cognitive and emotional traits in an objective way that might give them a sense of: What is this person really ideally suited for?” she says. So Polli co-founded Pymetrics, which uses  to measure things like attention to detail and risk tolerance — factors that she says can help determine a good job fit… A company called Knack claims to do this by tracking how people play their cellphone games…behind the scenes, Knack is collecting thousands of data points…
  • Update: What do schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, addiction, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, have in common?

    SharpBrains
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    Time for Sharp­Brains’ Februarye-newsletter, fea­tur­ing a wealth of neu­ro­science and neurotechnology news and brain health insights. New research Question: What do people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and anxiety have in common? Answer: A brain with similar gray-matter loss Long-term meditation can help slow down aging-related brain volume decline Fewer than 19% of ADHD treatment plans monitor treatment response according to guidelines The real brain drain: How unemployment depletes cognitive and emotional resources…
  • Open question: Can coffee & Ritalin’s mental effects be delivered, safely, over a smartphone?

    SharpBrains
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:58 am
    Will 2015 be the year our smartphones link up to our brains? (Popular Science): “Thync bills itself first and foremost as a neuroscience company. Its sole product—slated for release later this year—is a smartphone-controlled wearable device that will allow the user to actively alter his or her brain’s electrical state through transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The big idea: give users active influence over their brain chemistries, and therefore their moods, their anxiety, and even their mental productivity—an app that can conjure feeling of calm and tranquility or dial…
  • Study: Fewer than 19% of ADHD treatment plans monitor treatment response according to guidelines

    SharpBrains
    24 Feb 2015 | 6:48 am
    What did they find (at a recent study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveying community-based ADHD diagnoses and treatments)? For around 30 percent of children diagnosed with ADHD, the evidence that DSM criteria were met was missing. ADHD rating scales were collected from parents and teachers for only 56 percent of youth with an ADHD diagnosis. Pediatricians prescribed ADHD medication to roughly 93 percent of youth diagnosed with ADHD. Documentation that behavioral treatment was recommended, however, was present in only 13 percent of the charts. Follow-up contact (visit, phone call,…
  • Trend: Taking health (and brain health) care “beyond the pill”

    SharpBrains
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:01 am
    How Device Makers Can Take Healthcare “Beyond the Pill” (Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry): “One thing is clear: Pharma’s commitment to “beyond the pill” has never been so apparent. Each and every pharma company seems to have formed a division or a strategic team to explore new services around patient compliance, population health data and furthering connectivity for improving patient management… Medtronic, Abbott, GE and J&J have shown how to achieve FDA approval for the use of data from devices, although these are proprietary platforms…Healthcare providers can see…
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • BSP 116: Norman Doidge on Brain Plasticity

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:30 pm
    This month psychiatrist Norman Doidge returns to the Brain Science Podcast to discuss his new book The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers, which is a follow-up to his best-seller The Brain That Changes Itself (BSP 26). In this interview Dr. Doidge and I focus on the underlying principles of brain plasticity and their clinical implications. Although brain plasticity is well-established in the research community it has not yet fully penetrated clinical medicine where old views, which seen the brain as largely fixed in adulthood, make…
  • BSP 115: Eastern Philosophy and Western Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:13 pm
    Scientific interest in the Mind and Consciousness is relatively new, but both Western and Eastern Philosophy have a long tradition of exploring these topics. In his new book Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy, Evan Thompson explores how these diverse traditions can inform and enrich one another.Thompson goes beyond a narrow view of consciousness, which focuses only on the waking state. Instead he considers how dreaming, lucid dreaming, and even near death experiences can advance our understanding of how our brain's…
  • Brain Science Podcast Celebrates 8 Years of Neuroscience

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Ginger CampbeLL, host of the Brain Science Podcast  (L>R: Greta, Rusty, & Jake) The first episode of the Brain Science Podcast appeared on December 5, 2006, which makes it one of the longest running shows in any genre, not just science or medicine. I am especially proud of the fact that we have reached listeners in 219 different countries. BSP 114 is our 8th annual review episode and as a part of our year-end celebration all previous annual review episodes have been added to the FREE feed that also includes our most recent 25 episodes.The goal of our annual review episode is to…
  • "Neuroplasticity and Healing" (BSP 113)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    1 Dec 2014 | 9:29 am
    Click to play BSP 113 The Dalai Lama's first visit to Alabama included several large public gatherings but I was invited to attend "Neuroplasticity and Healing," which was the scientific symposium he hosted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). The featured neuroscientists were Dr. Edward Taub and Dr. Michael Merzenich. The moderator was Dr. Norman Doidge.The Dalai Lama has a long-standing interest in science and he told the rapt audience that his four areas of interest are cosmology, physics, neurobiology, and psychology.He is very interested in neuroplasticity and his visit to…
  • The Dalai Lama explores Neuroplasticity (BSP 113)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:06 pm
    The scientific highlight of the Dalai Lama's first visit to Alabama was an invitation-only event called "Neuroplasticity and Healing," which was held at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). BSP 113 features exclusive coverage of that event.Click here to play the audio. Right click to download the mp3 file. The episode transcript and full show notes will be posted next week.
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    Neuronarrative

  • Simple Life Hacks to Lose Weight and Improve Your Health

    David DiSalvo
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:51 pm
    Much of the self-improvement industry is focused on ways to cattle prod our willpower into healthier habits. Behavioral psychologists, on the other hand, have conducted a wealth of research showing that skillful hacks to our homes and offices can produce results that tweaks to willpower, however forceful, rarely make stick.
  • How Stress Makes Us Compulsive Pleasure Seekers

    David DiSalvo
    7 Feb 2015 | 11:36 am
    Researchers have shown that not only does stress predispose us to wanting pleasure, it makes our desire for it drastically out of proportion to our enjoyment. The reward never reaches the level of our want.
  • Why Happy People Often Seem Tone Deaf To Negative Emotions

    David DiSalvo
    31 Jan 2015 | 12:51 pm
    A new study finds that feeling positive doesn’t make you any better at empathy than others, and in some ways it’s a handicap.
  • Neuroscience Explains Why the Grinch Stole Christmas

    David DiSalvo
    21 Dec 2014 | 9:29 am
    If Cacioppo could persuade the Grinch to step into his fMRI, he'd likely observe a result consistent with those of a brain imaging study he conducted to identify differences in the neural mechanisms of lonely and nonlonely people.
  • Are You Vulnerable to the Hipster Effect?

    David DiSalvo
    2 Dec 2014 | 8:48 pm
    There is a group-sense inherent in human nature that lines us up favorably with birds and bees and ants and fish, though with us the dynamic is less reactive. Rather than reacting to an immediate cause, our patterns emerge in the form of social conformity. The irony is that we (particularly in Western cultures) pride ourselves on our alleged individuality.
 
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    "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich

  • Are “Helicopter Parents” Creating a Race of Disconnected Automatons?

    Dr. Merzenich
    25 Feb 2015 | 11:48 am
    One of the negative consequences of our high tech- and fear-dominated modern culture is the systematic withdrawal of children from independent and exploratory play, in natural social and physical environments. Our fear culture frustrates outside, unfettered exploration for the developing child. Parents can be arrested for leaving their children to play on their own, in […]The post Are “Helicopter Parents” Creating a Race of Disconnected Automatons? appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Research in Maori Community Yields Hope for Huntington’s

    Dr. Merzenich
    12 Feb 2015 | 6:26 am
    I have just returned from a couple weeks in New Zealand, where I am collaborating with Dr. Melanie Cheung and others on a pretty incredible Huntington’s disease project. I am so inspired by what we’re doing there that I wanted to share a bit about it. More than 7,000 of the 4.5 million citizens of […]The post Research in Maori Community Yields Hope for Huntington’s appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Podcast: Highlights from “Neuroplasticity and Healing” Summit…

    Dr. Merzenich
    15 Dec 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Did you miss the “Neuroplasticity and Healing” Summit with the Dalai Lama, Dr. Michael Merzenich, Dr. Edward Taub, and Norman Doidge? Or did you find the video feed a bit lengthy and hard to understand? The wonderful Brain Science Podcast–long on the top of our “great neuroscience podcasts” lists–has created an excellent episode featuring highlights […]The post Podcast: Highlights from “Neuroplasticity and Healing” Summit… appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Video: Michael Merzenich in Conversation with the Dalai Lama

    Dr. Merzenich
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Of all the neuroscientists in the world, who had the honor of sharing the stage with the Dalai Lama last week? Our co-founder and chief scientist, Dr. Michael Merzenich, was chosen for a very special on-stage discussion with His Holiness that took place this past weekend week at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. The symposium, […]The post Video: Michael Merzenich in Conversation with the Dalai Lama appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
  • Lifting the Fog of Chemobrain

    Dr. Merzenich
    13 Oct 2014 | 7:10 am
     Sometimes it’s incredibly frustrating to get the word out about BrainHQ and how it can help people. Let’s take people experiencing “chemobrain” (cognitive losses resulting from chemotherapy) as an example. Clinical scientists have shown that using BrainHQ exercises virtually re-normalizes the brain of an individual suffering from chemobrain. Benefits clearly extend beyond those skills and abilities that […]The post Lifting the Fog of Chemobrain appeared first on "On the Brain" with Dr. Michael Merzenich.
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • What Color Is This Dress? It’s An Optical Illusion

    Steven Novella
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:57 am
    This is pretty amazing – almost as much for how quickly this has gone viral as for the effect itself. There is now an intense debate going on in the intertubes over whether this dress is black and blue or white and gold. Take a look and decide for yourself. Buzzfeed has a poll which currently puts it at 72% white and gold, and 28% black and blue. Right now there are about 2 million votes, so that is probably statistically significant. I see black and blue, no matter what screen or version of that picture I look at. It does not seem to be an issue with the monitor or viewing conditions.
  • Liberals and Conservatives Both Resist Science, But Differently

    Steven Novella
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:00 am
    There have been a number of studies looking at how ideological belief influence attitudes toward science. It is no surprise that in general people, of whatever ideological bent, engage in motivated reasoning to deny science that appears to contradict their religious or political beliefs. There are different views, however, regarding whether or not the two main political ideologies in the US, liberal and conservative, are equal or substantially different in their resistance to science. A series of articles in a special section of The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social…
  • Anti-GMO Propaganda

    Steven Novella
    24 Feb 2015 | 5:11 am
    There is so much anti-science propaganda out there I often feel like I am emptying the ocean with a spoon. Just today I was faced with an array of choices for my post – should I take on anti-vaccine, anti-GMO, or anti-AGW propaganda? For today, anyway, anti-GMO won. I’ll get to the others eventually. This was sent to me by a reader – 5 reasons to avoid GMOs.  The content is mostly tired anti-GMO tropes (lies, really) that have been thoroughly debunked, but it is good to address such propaganda in a concise way. Also, it is a useful demonstration of the intellectual…
  • ADHD Is Real

    Steven Novella
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:13 am
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has long been a target of those who dislike the very concept of mental disorders. This is partly because the emotional stakes are high – the diagnosis often results in children being treated with stimulants. Opposition to the concept of ADHD also reflects fundamental misunderstandings about medicine. A recent opinion piece in The Blaze by Matt Walsh reflects this deep misunderstanding and unease with the concept of mental illness. Throughout the piece he uses the terms “disease” and “disorder” interchangeably,…
  • Phantom Acupuncture

    Steven Novella
    19 Feb 2015 | 5:15 am
    There are two basic schools of thought when it comes to acupuncture, which is the practice of placing thin needles into alleged acupuncture points in order to have a therapeutic or symptomatic effect. The “traditional” interpretation is that the needles are stimulating a physiological response of some kind at the acupuncture points. Within this school there is a range of opinions as to whether this response is due to a biochemical, neurological, or another known biological response or whether it is due to the still more traditional (but actually less than a century old) belief…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • The Newest Business Book on the Brain

    kjkrayer
    25 Feb 2015 | 11:10 am
    We have presented very few books about the brain at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.  Yet,
  • Why is stem cell therapy controversial? #stemcell

    Seeshaw
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:00 am
    Question Why is stem cell therapy controversial? Answer Short Answer: The stem cell controversy is the ethical debate centered only with research involving the creation, usage, and destruction of human embryos. Most commonly, this controversy focuses on embryonic stem cells. Not all stem cell research involves the creation, usage and destruction of human embryos. For example, adult stem cells, amniotic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells do not involve creating, using or destroying human embryos and thus are minimally, if at all, controversial. Source: Wikipedia Why did this come up…
  • Speaking Vimmish - Epic Science #107 If you tend to be a hand...

    scientiflix
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:42 am
    Speaking Vimmish – Epic Science #107 If you tend to be a hand talker — painting pictures with your 10 digits — well you may have a leg up on picking up a second language, or third for you overachievers. Find out why. By: How Stuff Works.
  • 442. Why Community?

    Steve Perrin
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Why am I carrying on about community as I have been in my last three posts? And culture before that? And nature before that? And will be carrying on about the family level of our engagements in posts yet to come? My point is that consciousness as I see it is not neatly packaged in the brain, but is a messy, collaborative effort between our minds and the worlds around us. I divide those worlds into levels of nature, culture, community, and family. Our brains tell only half the story; the surroundings with which we engage tell the other half. Without ambient worlds, we’d have no minds at all.
  • Humor+Usness: Humorousness can Change Parts of You

    smswaby
    25 Feb 2015 | 3:49 am
    http://www.dogscountryclub.blogspot.com Laughter is the sound of crashing brain cells. When we laugh with other people, there is a real reason that we look each other in the eye: Our brains are working together, brain cells are dancing and we are having a good time. Humor can change parts of you, and you’ve got to do some things. It’s a partnership. Stay tuned for more on this. The ability to laugh is a brain muscle that can grow with use, or shrink if we ignore it. That is part of my goal in writing this blog: to make bigger brains. When you laugh, you wake up. Researchers have…
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • A Causal Role for Posterior Medial Frontal Cortex in Choice-Induced Preference Change

    Izuma, K., Akula, S., Murayama, K., Wu, D.-A., Iacoboni, M., Adolphs, R.
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:49 am
    After a person chooses between two items, preference for the chosen item will increase and preference for the unchosen item will decrease because of the choice made. In other words, we tend to justify or rationalize our past behavior by changing our attitude. This phenomenon of choice-induced preference change has been traditionally explained by cognitive dissonance theory. Choosing something that is disliked or not choosing something that is liked are both cognitively inconsistent and, to reduce this inconsistency, people tend to change their subsequently stated preference in accordance with…
  • Use-Dependent Activation of Neuronal Kv1.2 Channel Complexes

    Baronas, V. A., McGuinness, B. R., Brigidi, G. S., Gomm Kolisko, R. N., Vilin, Y. Y., Kim, R. Y., Lynn, F. C., Bamji, S. X., Yang, R., Kurata, H. T.
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:49 am
    In excitable cells, ion channels are frequently challenged by repetitive stimuli, and their responses shape cellular behavior by regulating the duration and termination of bursts of action potentials. We have investigated the behavior of Shaker family voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels subjected to repetitive stimuli, with a particular focus on Kv1.2. Genetic deletion of this subunit results in complete mortality within 2 weeks of birth in mice, highlighting a critical physiological role for Kv1.2. Kv1.2 channels exhibit a unique property described previously as "prepulse potentiation," in…
  • The Role of Right Anterior Insula and Salience Processing in Inhibitory Control

    Ghahremani, A., Rastogi, A., Lam, S.
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:49 am
  • Persistent Pain Maintains Morphine-Seeking Behavior after Morphine Withdrawal through Reduced MeCP2 Repression of Glua1 in Rat Central Amygdala

    Hou, Y.-Y., Cai, Y.-Q., Pan, Z. Z.
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:49 am
    As long-term opioids are increasingly used for control of chronic pain, how pain affects the rewarding effect of opioids and hence risk of prescription opioid misuse and abuse remains a healthcare concern and a challenging issue in current pain management. In this study, using a rat model of morphine self-administration, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the impact of pain on operant behavior of morphine intake and morphine seeking before and after morphine withdrawal. We found that rats with persistent pain consumed a similar amount of daily morphine to that in control rats…
  • Granger Causality Analysis in Neuroscience and Neuroimaging

    Seth, A. K., Barrett, A. B., Barnett, L.
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:49 am
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    Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

  • Training Your Eyes To Hit That Curveball

    17 Feb 2015 | 12:16 pm
    “Just keep your eye on the ball.”  Seems like simple enough advice for a young slugger at the plate.  That may work in the early years of Little League baseball when the pitches they see  have not yet cracked 50 mph.  But as the fastballs get faster and the change-ups get slower, having quick eyes and an even quicker perceptual brain is the only way hitters will be able to “hit it square” with a round bat and a round ball.   Which is exactly why psychology researchers at the University of California - Riverside (UCR) teamed up with the college’s varsity…
  • The Subliminal Power Of Positive Cheering

    3 Feb 2015 | 7:19 pm
    Young athletes often hear phrases of encouragement like, “dig a little deeper” or “you have to want it more than they do” or, ideally, “be mentally tough.”  For most kids, these words from a coach, a parent or a teammate go in one ear and out the other.  But, what if there was actually some scientific substance to the words?  Could the smiling, confident face of a coach delivering a pep talk actually have a subliminal effect on performance?  While the conscious brain may dismiss this positive talk, the subconscious mind may actually be putting it to work,…
  • Sleep - The Next Best Thing To Practice

    17 Jan 2015 | 3:44 pm
    As usual, Mom was right.  Her advice to get to bed early is being confirmed by human performance researchers, sleep specialists and sports medicine doctors. Kids, especially young athletes, need more sleep.  While common sense tells us that a lack of shut-eye will cause children to be grumpy from a lack of energy, new knowledge about the brain details how sleep affects not only their physiological functions but also their ability to learn new skills.The more well-known sleep state known as REM (Rapid Eye Movement) is the dreammaker that tries to put our day’s activities into the…
  • For Aaron Rodgers, Practice Makes Perfect Motor Skills

    1 Jan 2015 | 5:18 pm
    During a Green Bay Packers win over the Atlanta Falcons earlier this season, Peter King, the NFL's dean of sportswriters, found a new level of respect for quarterback Aaron Rodgers.  Here's how King described one particular third and two play late in the first quarter:"At the snap, Rodgers’ first look, a long one, was to the left for Nelson. Well covered. Quickly Rodgers turned to the right, to where Cobb was planting his foot in the ground three or four yards upfield and preparing to run a simple in-cut; at the same time, his cover man, cornerback Desmond Trufant, was going to…
  • How Video Games Can Improve Your Kids' Hand-Eye Coordination

    14 Dec 2014 | 7:45 pm
    Well, there goes that golden piece of parental logic.  For years, we’ve been arguing, imploring and threatening our kids to get off their Xbox, PS4 or even Wiis (are those still around?) and get outside for some fresh air and reality.  It isn’t healthy, we argued, to sit in front of that TV and play video games for hours.  While we still have the cardiovascular argument in our corner, new research just confirmed that gaming actually improves our kids’ ability to learn new sensorimotor skills.Playing “first person” games, like Call of Duty or Madden, drops the user…
 
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    The Brain Understanding Itself

  • Neuroscience, Personalized Medicine and Faith

    Alex Doman
    18 Feb 2015 | 4:29 pm
    Did you catch my discussion with neurologist Jay Lombard on The Listening Program® Radio a couple weeks ago? It was a fascinating conversation. And, you can enjoy the podcast here. About the program Neuroscience provides amazing insights into the complex biology of the human brain, but can it do more? Is neuroscience also a gateway to inner being? And, can there be common ground between neuroscience and faith that are not mutually exclusive?  Both science and religion seek truth and meaning, and Dr. Jay Lombard postulates that science plus faith equals consciousness. In this episode of TLP…
  • Music, the Brain and Therapeutic Results

    Alex Doman
    6 Jan 2015 | 3:55 pm
      It’s a New Year and time for the first episode of The Listening Program® Radio for 2015! And, I’m elated to share that Dr. Concetta M. Tomaino will be my guest tomorrow, Wednesday, January 7th from 8:00-9:00 PM Eastern to discuss Music, the Brain and Therapeutic Results. Dr. Tomaino is executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function and is internationally known for her research in the clinical applications of music and neurologic rehabilitation including decades of clinical work with the acclaimed neurologist and best-selling author Dr. Oliver…
  • Psychoacoustic Music

    Alex Doman
    4 Dec 2014 | 8:23 am
    Alex Doman:I found this to be an interesting and in-depth review of our Sleep Genius mobile apps which emphasizes the strength of the collaboration between the creators of our novel sleep technology. Originally posted on thedeadscientificwriterssocietyreviews: by: Wan It’s not hard to miss the days when we get to wake up whenever we want, refreshed and relaxed in bed while a warm and soft blanket covers you. Nowadays, the first thing that greets us when we wake is our own blaring alarm, reminding us to get ready to go to school or work, and we would get up, stumbling and staggering about,…
  • Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain

    Alex Doman
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:27 pm
    As a parent to 3 boys, two of whom are adolescents, I’m equally fascinated and perplexed by the inner workings of their minds. To help unravel the mysteries of the teenage brain I’ve invited New York Times Bestselling Author and renowned neuropsychiatrist Daniel Siegel, M.D. for an interview on The Listening Program® Radio to explore the teenage brain. According to Dr. Siegel if parents and teens can work together to form a deeper understanding of the brain science behind all the tumult, they will be able to turn conflict into connection and form a deeper understanding of one…
  • Alive Inside: The Story of Music and Memory

    Alex Doman
    1 Oct 2014 | 2:09 pm
    Perhaps you saw the viral video that was going around in the summer of 2012. It featured an elderly gentleman in a nursing home, coming alive through listening to music from his era as if it was manna from heaven. I posted about Henry’s Music back then not knowing that two years later a social worker named Dan Cohen, the man responsible for giving the gift of music to Henry would be my guest on The Listening Program® Radio. That video was a clip from the production of Alive Inside, the 2014 Sundance Audience Award winning documentary, which brings attention to the work of nonprofit Music…
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    Brain Posts

  • Exercise Guidelines in Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    18 Feb 2015 | 8:53 am
    A series of seven guidelines for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has recently been published.These guidelines resulted from a conference of experts in nutrition and the brain.The guidelines included a recommendation for 40 minutes of aerobic exercise three times a week.Support for this exercise recommendation by experts was linked to 2 areas of research:Observational studies show lower rates of AD in regular exercise groups compared to sedentary groupsA single clinical trial found reduced brain atrophy and improved memory following an intervention where elderly adults were…
  • Exercise and the Brain: Research Links

    9 Feb 2015 | 7:41 am
    I am posting links to some of the most recent research related to exercise effects on the brain.These come from a process of selecting posts to examine in more detail this month.Clicking on the links will take you to the PubMed abstract. Most of the abstracts also have free full text links.Enhancing brain activity through multidisciplinary interventions in the elderlyThis Chinese study examined the effects of cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise and counseling on a group of 17 elderly individuals compared to controls. The study examined brain low frequency fluctuations and found improved…
  • Exercise in the Elderly: BDNF and Executive Function

    4 Feb 2015 | 6:32 am
    Exercise promotes cognitive function in children, adults and elderly individuals.The mechanism for this effect is unclear. Some of the effect may be due to a general improvement in vascular function and health.Another potential mechanism is via increased neuroplasticity mediated by neurotrophic factors.Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) is a known contributor to brain neuroplasticity. Levels of BNDF can be determined with serum assays.RL Leckie and colleagues recently found support for BNDF mediation in an exercise in an interventional study with an elderly population.The key elements…
  • Exercise in the Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    2 Feb 2015 | 8:39 am
    Growing evidence links physical activity to improved cognitive outcome in elderly individuals.Few studies have examined effects of exercise on those at highest risk for Alzheimer's disease.J Carson Smith and colleagues recently published a prospective study of a cohort of older adults using structural magnetic resonance imaging.The key elements of the design of their study included the following elements:Participants: 97 adults between the ages of 65 and 89Physical activity level: Frequency and intensity of leisure activity was assessed using the Stanford Brief Activity SurveyAlzheimer's risk…
  • Obesity, Inflammation and Cognitive Decline

    26 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    The rate of cognitive decline with aging is quite variable. Identifying important components of this process is needed for developing interventions to reduce the burden of Alzheimer's and other dementias.Excess inflammation has been linked to obesity as well as aging-related cognitive decline.Archana Singh-Manoux and colleagues recently published a study of the association between blood markers of inflammation and cognitive decline.This study used data from the U.K. Whitehall II cohort, a group of men and women between the ages of 35-55 at intake.This cohort has now been studied over a…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • Can Money Really Buy Happiness? Researchers Weigh In

    ScienceDaily
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:37 am
    Source: ScienceDailyResearchers have delved into the effects of experiential purchases, potential negative impacts on abundance, the psychology of lending to friends, and how the wealthy think differently about well-being.
  • Finding Psychological Insights Through Social Media

    ScienceDaily
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:37 am
    Source: ScienceDailySocial media has opened up a new digital world for psychology research. Researchers are developing new methods of language analysis, and how social media can be leveraged to study personality, mental and physical health, and cross-cultural differences.
  • Same-Sex Marriage Proponents Claim "Right Side of History"

    USA Today - U.S. News
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:36 am
    Source: USA Today - U.S. NewsInitial briefs for same-sex marriage plaintiffs are filed with the Supreme Court.
  • Introverts Prefer Mountains, Study Finds

    ScienceDaily
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:36 am
    Source: ScienceDailyIn a series of three studies, researchers tested whether there is a link between personality and an aspect of physical ecology: flat terrain versus mountainous terrain. The study found that only one of the Big Five personality traits predicted terrain preference -- extraversion.
  • Blood Biomarkers Found for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Yahoo News - Health
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:35 am
    Source: Yahoo News - HealthChronic fatigue syndrome is a disease with distinct stages that can be identified through biomarkers in the blood, researchers said Friday, offering hope that earlier diagnosis may improve treatment. With no known cause or cure, chronic fatigue syndrome -- known formally as encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS) -- has long puzzled the medical community. "We now have evidence confirming what millions of people with this disease already know, that...
 
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    The Neurocritic

  • One Brain Network for All Mental Illness

    19 Feb 2015 | 9:22 pm
    What do schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, addiction, obsessive compulsive disorder, and anxiety have in common? A loss of gray matter in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and bilateral anterior insula, according to a recent review of the structural neuroimaging literature (Goodkind et al., 2015). These two brain regions are important for executive functions, the top-down cognitive processes that allow us to maintain goals and flexibly alter our behavior in response to changing circumstances. The authors modestly concluded they had identified a “Common…
  • Against Initiatives: "don't be taken in by the boondoggle"

    31 Jan 2015 | 11:30 pm
     ...or should I say braindoggle...I've been reading The Future of the Brain, a collection of Essays by the World's Leading Neuroscientists edited by Gary Marcus and Jeremy Freeman. Amidst the chapters on jaw-dropping technical developments, Big Factory Science, and Grand Neuroscience Initiatives, one stood out for its contrarian stance (and personally reflective tone). Here's Professor Leah Krubitzer, who heads the Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology at University of California, Davis:“From a personal rather than scientific standpoint, the final important thing I've learned is don't be…
  • This Blog Is Brought to You by the Number 9 and the Letter K

    27 Jan 2015 | 11:57 pm
    The Neurocritic (the blog) began 9 years ago today.I've enjoyed the journey immensely and look forward to the years to come, by Nodes of Ranvier (the band — not the myelin sheath gaps).Node of RanvierAnd now a word from our sponsors,  Episode 3979 of Sesame Street...The Number 9The Letter kThank you for watching! (and reading).
  • Is it necessary to use brain imaging to understand teen girls' sexual decision making?

    26 Jan 2015 | 3:13 am
    “It is feasible to recruit and retain a cohort of female participants to perform a functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI] task focused on making decisions about sex, on the basis of varying levels of hypothetical sexual risk, and to complete longitudinal prospective diaries following this task. Preliminary evidence suggests that risk level differentially impacts brain activity related to sexual decision making in these women [i.e., girls aged 14-15 yrs], which may be related to past and future sexual behaviors.”-Hensel et al. (2015) Can the brain activity of adolescents predict…
  • Interfering With Traumatic Memories of the Boston Marathon Bombings

    18 Jan 2015 | 10:14 pm
    The Boston Marathon bombings of April 15, 2013 killed three people and injured hundreds of others near the finish line of the iconic footrace. The oldest and most prominent marathon in the world, Boston attracts over 20,000 runners and 500,000 spectators. The terrorist act shocked and traumatized and unified the city.What should the survivors do with their traumatic memories of the event? Many with disabling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receive therapy to lessen the impact of the trauma. Should they forget completely? Is it possible to selectively “alter” or “remove” a…
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    The Beautiful Brain

  • This is Your Brain on Radio

    Ben Ehrlich
    1 Mar 2015 | 3:44 pm
    (The famous patient H.M. as a young man.) The new STEM podcast Transistor, presented by the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, has released new neuroscience episodes called Totally Cerebral. The host, Wendy Suzuki, is a scientist at NYU who studies learning, memory, and cognition. In a review of the first two episodes, The A.V. Club called the show “gripping and immediate the way the best sort of storytelling podcast can be, as these scientists are not only bright but personable and emotionally connected to their studies.”  Part 1 is…
  • The Interdisciplinary Curator

    Ben Ehrlich
    6 Feb 2015 | 6:56 am
    Over at Nautilus, there is an interview with superstar curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist, the co-director of London’s Serpentine Gallery. Obrist has worked with some of the most famous artists in the world, but he has collaborated with scientists in the past. Most recently, he has collaborated with John Brockman of the Edge to present an event called “Extinction Marathon,” which asked artists, writers, scientists, filmmakers, theorists, and musicians to present on the topic of Extinction. Obrist seems determined to bring interdisciplinary creativity back to life. “I…
  • Answers from the Edge

    Ben Ehrlich
    26 Jan 2015 | 12:38 pm
    The Edge.org, the online salon for the world’s “most complex and sophisticated minds,” has released the answers to its annual question. This year’s question was What Do You Think About Machines That Think? (“Is AI becoming increasingly real? Are we now in the new era of AI?, ), and there were 186 respondents, including philosopher Daniel Dennett (“The Singularity—an Urban Legend?”), musician Brian Eno (“Just a New Fractal Detail in the Big Picture”), physicist Freeman Dyson (“I Could Be Wrong”), cognitive scientist…
  • The Theater of Consciousness

    Ben Ehrlich
    22 Jan 2015 | 8:26 am
    Tom Stoppard has written his first new play in almost a decade. It will open at the National Theatre in London on January 28, and it’s about…consciousness!  The Hard Problem, named for philosopher David Chalmers’ famous formulation of the supreme mystery of qualia, tells the story of a young psychologist at a brain-science institute. According to the overview, the protagonist Hilary “is nursing a private sorrow and a troubling question at work, where psychology and biology meet. If there is nothing but matter, what is consciousness?” With his new play, the…
  • The Music of Brain Waves

    Ben Ehrlich
    6 Jan 2015 | 1:00 pm
    London-based artist Aiste Noreikaite has developed a high-tech device that translates neural processes into sound in real time using EEG technology. According to Noreikaite, the Experience Helmet, which looks like an ordinary white motorcycle helmet, creates an “audible reflection of one’s personal experience of the present moment.” The sounds inside the helmet become higher when users have clear minds, and faster and more rhythmic when they focus on particular subjects. (via The Creator’s Project) (photo credit Natalja Safronova)
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    The Neurocritic

  • One Brain Network for All Mental Illness

    The Neurocritic
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:22 pm
    What do schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, addiction, obsessive compulsive disorder, and anxiety have in common? A loss of gray matter in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and bilateral anterior insula, according to a recent review of the structural neuroimaging literature (Goodkind et al., 2015). These two brain regions are important for executive functions, the top-down cognitive processes that allow us to maintain goals and flexibly alter our behavior in response to changing circumstances. The authors modestly concluded they had identified a “Common…
  • Against Initiatives: "don't be taken in by the boondoggle"

    The Neurocritic
    31 Jan 2015 | 11:30 pm
     ...or should I say braindoggle...I've been reading The Future of the Brain, a collection of Essays by the World's Leading Neuroscientists edited by Gary Marcus and Jeremy Freeman. Amidst the chapters on jaw-dropping technical developments, Big Factory Science, and Grand Neuroscience Initiatives, one stood out for its contrarian stance (and personally reflective tone). Here's Professor Leah Krubitzer, who heads the Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology at University of California, Davis:“From a personal rather than scientific standpoint, the final important thing I've learned is don't be…
  • This Blog Is Brought to You by the Number 9 and the Letter K

    The Neurocritic
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:57 pm
    The Neurocritic (the blog) began 9 years ago today.I've enjoyed the journey immensely and look forward to the years to come, by Nodes of Ranvier (the band — not the myelin sheath gaps).Node of RanvierAnd now a word from our sponsors,  Episode 3979 of Sesame Street...The Number 9The Letter kThank you for watching! (and reading).
  • Is it necessary to use brain imaging to understand teen girls' sexual decision making?

    The Neurocritic
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:13 am
    “It is feasible to recruit and retain a cohort of female participants to perform a functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI] task focused on making decisions about sex, on the basis of varying levels of hypothetical sexual risk, and to complete longitudinal prospective diaries following this task. Preliminary evidence suggests that risk level differentially impacts brain activity related to sexual decision making in these women [i.e., girls aged 14-15 yrs], which may be related to past and future sexual behaviors.”-Hensel et al. (2015) Can the brain activity of adolescents predict…
  • Interfering With Traumatic Memories of the Boston Marathon Bombings

    The Neurocritic
    18 Jan 2015 | 10:14 pm
    The Boston Marathon bombings of April 15, 2013 killed three people and injured hundreds of others near the finish line of the iconic footrace. The oldest and most prominent marathon in the world, Boston attracts over 20,000 runners and 500,000 spectators. The terrorist act shocked and traumatized and unified the city.What should the survivors do with their traumatic memories of the event? Many with disabling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receive therapy to lessen the impact of the trauma. Should they forget completely? Is it possible to selectively “alter” or “remove” a…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • How Posture Can Affect the Brain

    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Feb 2015 | 10:55 am
    For decades now, scientists have had a good knowledge of the descending neural and hormonal pathways by which the human brain influences the human body. But until quite recently, there was still a tendency to underestimate just how much the human body influences the human brain. In an experiment reported in 2010, however, social psychologist Amy Cuddy showed that simply adopting a body posture associated with dominance will, within two minutes, cause measurable changes in people’s blood concentrations of certain hormones, and in certain of their behaviours, such as risk-taking. As Cuddy…
  • Famous Amnesia Patient “K.C.” Dies

    Bruno Dubuc
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:20 am
    He was almost as famous as Henri Molaison, the famous patient “H.M.” who was studied for decades by eminent researchers such as neuropsychologist Brenda Milner, in Montreal, and who died in 2008. Patient “K.C.”, whose real name was Kent Cochrane, died more recently, on March 27, 2014, at the age of 62. K.C. grew up in the suburbs of Toronto. Unlike H.M., who had had his two hippocampi surgically removed because of epilepsy, K.C. suffered serious damage to his brain, including both hippocampi, in a motorcycle accident on his way home from work, at the age of 30. But like H.M, K.C.
  • Functions of the amygdala : more diverse than previously thought

    Bruno Dubuc
    27 Jan 2015 | 6:33 am
    Science in general, and neuroscience in particular, are constantly evolving. So even though our knowledge of a given brain structure may not have undergone a scientific revolution or a paradigm shift at any given time, when we compare what we know about it now with what we knew, say, 10 years ago, we may find that things have changed a lot. That’s certainly the case for the amygdala, a small but very important piece of the brain. And since we first described the amygdala on this website just about 10 years ago, we’d like to give you a little update now. The amygdala is roughly the size…
  • Literary Activity and the Default Mode Network

    Bruno Dubuc
    6 Jan 2015 | 9:07 am
    In every human culture, much of life revolves around the stories that we tell—about the world around us, about other people, and about ourselves. When you come right down to it, just like traditional oral storytelling, that is all that modern literature and film do today. There must be something in the brain that resonates especially strongly with the narrative process. That something might well resemble what neuroscientists call the the brain’s default mode network: the particular set of brain structures whose activity increases by default, when someone is doing absolutely nothing.
  • The Infinitely Large, Infinitely Small, and Infinitely Complex

    Bruno Dubuc
    16 Dec 2014 | 1:26 pm
    This week, we’re going to talk about nothing less than the place that the human brain occupies in the known universe. Let’s begin by recalling that, as stated often elsewhere on The Brain from Top to Bottom, the brain that each of us possesses is one of the most complex objects in that universe, which is already saying a lot. The complexity of the human brain is one of the reasons that this website is organized the way it is. First of all, it offers explanations at three levels of difficulty—Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced—though even the Advanced level scarcely begins to…
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    Your Brain Health

  • Three evidence-based daily habits for wellbeing and happiness

    Sarah McKay
    23 Feb 2015 | 7:55 pm
    This week I spoke with Megan McDonough CEO and co-founder along with Dr. Tal Ben-Shahar of the Wholebeing Institute. Megan is here in Australia working with Justin Robinson the director of the Institute of Positive Education at Geelong Grammar School. They’re promoting the Australian version of the Certificate in Whole-Person Positive Psychology (CiPP). Which by the […] The post Three evidence-based daily habits for wellbeing and happiness appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Did Rick Hanson’s Positive Neuroplasticity training change my skeptical mind?

    Sarah McKay
    9 Feb 2015 | 10:07 pm
    See that photo over there to the right?  That’s me and Rick Hanson PhD, a neuropsychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author of the books Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence  and Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love and Wisdom. Rick […] The post Did Rick Hanson’s Positive Neuroplasticity training change my skeptical mind? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Brain Rules – Walking Book Club

    Sarah McKay
    3 Feb 2015 | 3:24 pm
    The return of the Walking Book Club Lets kick this Walking Book Club off again!! Why walk and talk? …. The human brain became the most powerful in the world under conditions where motion was a constant presence. Our fancy brains developed not while we were lounging around but while we were working out.  John Medina […] The post Brain Rules – Walking Book Club appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • 5 ways to improve your body-mind connection

    Sarah McKay
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:29 am
    Heard of the mind-body connection?  Did you know that the chit chat between mind and body goes two ways? Your body is an integral part of how you think. Your body, how you move it, and how you interact with your physical surroundings shapes how you think, feel, and behave. In her new book How the Body Knows […] The post 5 ways to improve your body-mind connection appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • The colour of music

    Sarah McKay
    8 Jan 2015 | 2:55 pm
    Vanessa Wamsley is a journalist who writes science, nature and education stories. After years of misunderstanding science, she brings a keen sense of wonder to her observations of the world. Vanessa is also a content and SEO editor intern at BiohacksBlog.com and studies science and medical writing in the Johns Hopkins University Masters in Science Writing program. A former teacher, […] The post The colour of music appeared first on Your Brain Health.
 
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