Neuroscience

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  • Study Connects Sleep Deficits Among Young Fruitflies to Disruption in Mating Later in Life

    Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News Updates
    Neuroscience News
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:27 am
    Researchers discover a link between sleep loss in young fruit flies and mating behavior later in life.
  • Brain anatomy differences between deaf, hearing depend on first language learned

    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily
    15 Apr 2014 | 3:13 pm
    In the first known study of its kind, researchers have shown that the language we learn as children affects brain structure, as does hearing status. 'What we've learned to date about differences in brain anatomy in hearing and deaf populations hasn't taken into account the diverse language experiences among people who are deaf,' says one of the authors.
  • It’s your own time you’re wasting

    Mind Hacks
    vaughanbell
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:15 pm
    British teachers have voted to receive training in neuroscience ‘to improve classroom practice’ according to a report in the Times Educational Supplement and the debate sounded like a full-on serial head-desker. The idea of asking for neuroscience training at all sounds a little curious but the intro seemed like it could be quite reasonable: Members of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) at the union’s annual conference narrowly voted for a motion calling for training materials and policies on applying neuroscience to education and for further research on how…
  • Don’t Be Mistaken: You are in control!

    neuroscience « WordPress.com Tag Feed
    MK
    14 Apr 2014 | 5:57 am
    There are many disputes around how much we are in control of our lives. Some say we have no free wil
  • Why You Are a Complete Idiot If You Don’t Google Yourself

    Neuromarketing
    Roger Dooley
    16 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    The other day, I read a story at Fast Company titled Why You Should Google Yourself And Not Feel Guilty About It. I agreed with the reasoning of the author, Lindsay Lavine (@lindsaylavine), but was slightly puzzled by the “guilty” part. The headline was underscored by the opening sentence, “Admit it. You’ve Googled yourself, and [...]
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    Brains On Purpose™

  • Video: Amishi Jha on the neuroscience of mindfulness

    StephanieWestAllen
    8 Apr 2014 | 5:40 am
    In February, a large group of us were fortunate to hear neuroscientist Amishi Jha speak on the brain science of mindfulness. All of you, no matter where you are, can watch part of her program now. Click to see her Friday evening lecture. The YouTube description: Respected brain researcher Amishi Jha brings a fascinating exploration of findings from cutting-edge neuroscience...
  • Good to hear: Two interviews with me have made top-10 or most-listened-to lists

    StephanieWestAllen
    27 Mar 2014 | 3:23 pm
    I am pleased to say that the interview by Zena Zumeta of me for the Texas Conflict Coach Radio Blog Show was one of The Best of 2013. The description: Brains on Purpose: Traits and States to Shape Your Conflict Fate Our brains are changing all the time. We can be in control of those changes or we can have...
  • An authentically calming voice: Another benefit of mindfulness for lawyers, mediators, counselors

    StephanieWestAllen
    23 Mar 2014 | 8:15 am
    Your tone of voice can affect your client's ability to hear you, especially in times of stress. In order to have a tone of voice that allows us to be heard, we need to monitor our own level of tension, our own level of defensiveness, our own level of feeling safe. Ongoing monitoring requires mindfulness. And a truly calming tone...
  • Video: The Lawyer's Brain on Meditation

    StephanieWestAllen
    19 Mar 2014 | 3:37 pm
    The latest video to be posted on the YouTube channel for the Berkeley Initiative for Mindfulness in the Law is The Lawyer's Brain on Meditation: Insights from Neuroscience. The description: Neuroscientist Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Ph D, Science Director of the Greater Good Science Center, presents at Berkeley Law on the ways meditation can improve the well-being, concentration, and emotional intelligence of...
  • How to focus that wandering mind

    StephanieWestAllen
    3 Mar 2014 | 1:07 pm
    Below is an article with a good overview of a skill and habit that is helpful, probably essential, to both parties in dispute and conflict professionals: focusing a mind that's wandering. The article also explains some of the neuroscience underlying focus and wandering. From "How to Focus a Wandering Mind" (DailyGood.org): Reading all this might make you think that we’d...
 
 
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    Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Cancer drugs block dementia-linked brain inflammation, study finds

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:33 am
    A class of drugs developed to treat immune-related conditions and cancer -- including one currently in clinical trials for glioblastoma and other tumors -- eliminates neural inflammation associated with dementia-linked diseases and brain injuries, according to researchers. In their study, the researchers discovered that the drugs, which can be delivered orally, eradicated microglia, the primary immune cells of the brain. These cells exacerbate many neural diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, as well as brain injury.
  • How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:33 am
    Waves in your brain make smells stick to your memories and inner maps. Researchers have recently discovered the process behind this phenomenon. The brain, it turns out, connects smells to memories through an associative process where neural networks are linked through synchronized brain waves of 20-40 Hz.
  • Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:37 pm
    A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research.
  • Brain anatomy differences between deaf, hearing depend on first language learned

    15 Apr 2014 | 3:13 pm
    In the first known study of its kind, researchers have shown that the language we learn as children affects brain structure, as does hearing status. 'What we've learned to date about differences in brain anatomy in hearing and deaf populations hasn't taken into account the diverse language experiences among people who are deaf,' says one of the authors.
  • Neuroscientists disprove important idea about brain-eye coordination

    15 Apr 2014 | 3:12 pm
    By predicting our eye movements, our brain creates a stable world for us. Researchers used to think that those predictions had so much influence that they could cause us to make errors in estimating the position of objects. Neuroscientists have now shown this to be incorrect. These new findings challenge fundamental knowledge regarding coordination between brain and eyes.
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Thou shall not steal: Houston’s wage theft ordinance in action [The Pump Handle]

    Celeste Monforton, DrPH, MPH
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:28 pm
    Going to a job and getting paid appropriately for your time is how it is supposed to work. Doing your job and getting gipped out of you pay is wrong and illegal. The economic consequences of wage theft for the victims and their families are profound: the threat and reality of losing utilities, food and housing. One of the single biggest risk factors for ill health is poverty. That makes wage theft a public health problem. But catching and punishing employer-thieves is difficult. The federal and state enforcement agencies are under resourced and the laws weak. It’s also one thing to have a…
  • Meet the USA Science & Engineering Festival Youth Advisor Board! Join our Twitter Chat Tonight! [USA Science and Engineering Festival: The Blog]

    carlyo
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:25 pm
    You could call them child or teen prodigies – wunderkinds, who at remarkable young ages have already begun making their mark upon science and technology as innovators and visionaries. The USA Science & Engineering Festival not only applauds such young achievers, but is recruiting some of the best of them to serve on its new Youth Advisory Board. The achievements of these recently-appointed board members will not only help us further excite, inspire and reach out to more students during the Festival next week, but will also call attention to the impressive cadre of young talent that is…
  • Distant Cousins: Kepler-186f [Dynamics of Cats]

    Steinn Sigurðsson
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:48 am
    Big Eyed Beans from Venus – Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band! Cool. Literally Comparable to Mars in effective temperature, bit larger than Earth, probably slightly more massive than Earth (mean density could be lower), atmosphere unknown. Might well have extensive surface regions with persistent liquid water. Kepler-186f comparison
  • Are electric cars any good? Lomborg says no, but he’s wrong. [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:47 am
    Sohn Stossel, writing at Real Annoying Clear Politics, (which is not a terrible place except for John Stossel) quotes some guy named Bjorn Lomborg about electric cars, thusly: Do environmentalists even care about measuring costs instead of just assuming benefits? We spend $7 billion to subsidize electric cars. Even if America reached the president’s absurd 2015 goal of “a million electric cars on the road” (we won’t get close), how much would it delay warming of the Earth? “One hour,” says Lomborg. “This is a symbolic act.” There are a lot of…
  • Breaking News: Virginia Supreme Court on Academic Freedom at UV [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:22 am
    An important Virginia Supreme Court finding came out today, related to the hugely complicated maneno that I feel totally unqualified to explain to you … but Michale Halpern of the Center for Science and Democracy is: The Supreme Court of Virginia today found unanimously in favor of the University of Virginia in its attempt to protect its employees from unwarranted intrusions into their privacy through the commonwealth’s Freedom of Information Act (VFOIA). In doing so, the Court rebuffed efforts by the American Tradition Institute (ATI) to gain access to the private correspondence of…
 
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    Deric Bownds' MindBlog

  • Attributing awareness to oneself and others.

    17 Apr 2014 | 5:22 am
    Kelley et al. make some fascinating observations. I pass on their statement of the significance of the work and their abstract: Significance What is the relationship between your own private awareness of events and the awareness that you intuitively attribute to the people around you? In this study, a region of the human cerebral cortex was active when people attributed sensory awareness to someone else. Furthermore, when that region of cortex was temporarily disrupted, the person’s own sensory awareness was disrupted. The findings suggest a fundamental connection between private awareness…
  • Poor people judge more harshly.

    16 Apr 2014 | 3:49 am
    From Pitesa and Thau: In the research presented here, we tested the idea that a lack of material resources (e.g., low income) causes people to make harsher moral judgments because a lack of material resources is associated with a lower ability to cope with the effects of others’ harmful behavior. Consistent with this idea, results from a large cross-cultural survey (Study 1) showed that both a chronic (due to low income) and a situational (due to inflation) lack of material resources were associated with harsher moral judgments. The effect of inflation was stronger for low-income…
  • Memory reactivation in aging versus young brains.

    15 Apr 2014 | 3:31 am
    Given my status as a senior aging person I always note the passing article that chronicles yet another way in which the equipment upstairs is losing it. Here is a bit from St-Laurent et al. that shows that the greater difficulty senior people have in recalling past experiences, replaying them, is not in the quality of their initial perceptions, but in fetching them up during recall attempts. (I've thought about preparing a longer written piece or talk on brain changes in aging, drawn mainly from MindBlog posts, but have decided I would rather go for more cheerful topics.) We investigated how…
  • Enhancing or lowering performance monitoring activity of our brains.

    14 Apr 2014 | 3:46 am
    Wow, here is a fascinating observation. Small electrical currents applied to our medial frontal cortex can either enhance or abolish our brains' error detection and feedback adjustment activities: Adaptive human behavior depends on the capacity to adjust cognitive processing after an error. Here we show that transcranial direct current stimulation of medial–frontal cortex provides causal control over the electrophysiological responses of the human brain to errors and feedback. Using one direction of current flow, we eliminated performance-monitoring activity, reduced behavioral adjustments…
  • Caloric restriction and longevity.

    11 Apr 2014 | 3:32 am
    I thought I would pass on this recent open access Nature article by the Univ. of Wisconsin group studying the effects of caloric restriction in Rhesus monkeys, studies meant to be more relevant to us humans that the mouse work showing increased health and longevity caused by dietary restriction. They suggest that a reason that an NIH study found less striking effects was that the controls in the NIH study were also effectively calorically restricted. Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases longevity and delays the onset of age-associated disorders in short-lived species, from…
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    Brain Blogger

  • Executive Pathologies – The Relationship Between CEO Narcissism and Fraud

    Lindsay Myers, MBA, MPH
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:19 am
    Research suggests an association between CEO personality traits and fraudulent behavior. Narcissism has been linked to manipulation of financial results, which has implications for the executive selection process, board oversight, and the structuring of executive compensation packages.The celebration of financial misconduct in movies like The Wolf of Wall Street tends to focus on the enthralling aspects of the perpetrator’s personality, rather than the economic woe that ensues for other, less glamorous stakeholders such as the average investor or the employee who loses his or her job in the…
  • Empathy and Stress – Women Are the Stronger Sex

    Jennifer Gibson, PharmD
    13 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    I learned many of life’s great lessons while watching Audrey Hepburn movies with my grandmother. To this day, I cannot hear the word “empathy” without being reminded of the first time I heard that word in the movie Funny Face. Empathy is difficult to study, owing to its many dimensions and facets, but it is essential to human interaction. And new evidence suggests that women may be better at it than men.In the movie, Audrey Hepburn plays Jo, a shy bookkeeper who wants to spend her days studying the theories of empathicalism. When Fred Astaire (as Dick Avery) asks her about her…
  • Does Spirituality and Religion Guard Against Depression?

    Jesse Bisignano, MA
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    There has long been anecdotal evidence that sustained spiritual or religious practice can help improve people’s mood and general sense of well-being. For the first time, we may be on the cusp of understanding the neurological mechanisms underlying these long reported effects.A recent study from Columbia University has found that there is a strong correlation between how highly someone values spirituality and religion, and the structure of their brains in regions associated with depression. According to lead researcher Lisa Miller, participants who reported that spirituality and religion…
  • Paranoid Schizophrenia and Paradoxical Intervention

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    9 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    Psychotic ideation is delusional and illusory. One cannot simply convey to a psychotic individual that he has a valid perspective. To an extent, it has been traditionally asserted in the field of mental health that one should not affirm the psychotic beliefs of the schizophrenic. Contrarily, some clinicians believe that one should persistently deny the schizophrenic any validation in this regard.If one considers treatment for other disorders, such as Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Borderline Personality Disorder, it is well-founded that sensible and ethical treatment for these…
  • Using Neurofeedback to Treat Substance Use Disorder

    Richard Kensinger, MSW
    7 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    A recent article suggests the possibility that neurofeedback (NFB) can be useful in the treatment of those experiencing substance use disorders (SUD). In this article, I articulate these possibilities further.From the referenced article, I have extracted the following quote attributed to Dr. Othmer.Dr. Sigfried Othmer is director of the EEG Institute and is quoted in the article as indicating “the brain wants to work from a resting state.” He further explains: “The problem with PTSD is that those who suffer from it can no longer access that state because they’re feeling…
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    Mind Hacks

  • It’s your own time you’re wasting

    vaughanbell
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:15 pm
    British teachers have voted to receive training in neuroscience ‘to improve classroom practice’ according to a report in the Times Educational Supplement and the debate sounded like a full-on serial head-desker. The idea of asking for neuroscience training at all sounds a little curious but the intro seemed like it could be quite reasonable: Members of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) at the union’s annual conference narrowly voted for a motion calling for training materials and policies on applying neuroscience to education and for further research on how…
  • The biases of pop psychology

    vaughanbell
    15 Apr 2014 | 12:45 am
    I just found this great piece at Scientific American that makes a fascinating point about how pop psychology books that inform us about our biases tend not to inform us about our most important bias – the effect of making things into stories – despite the fact that they rely on it to get their message across The piece starts by quoting economist Tyler Cowen: “There’s the Nudge book, the Sway book, the Blink book… [they are] all about the ways in which we screw up. And there are so many ways, but what I find interesting is that none of these books identify what, to me, is…
  • Spike activity 11-04-2014

    vaughanbell
    13 Apr 2014 | 11:28 am
    Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Things I’ve learned since being sectioned. Good piece on the appropriately named Sectioned blog. The New York Times covers the latest in rising fads in proposed psychiatric diagnoses: sluggish cognitive tempo. Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon. Neuroskeptic discusses critiques of fMRI. Slate has a eulogy to a man with amnesia taught us how memories become personal through scientific studies where he was known as ‘KC’ – now known to be Kent Cochrane. Suspect in the disturbingly weird ‘selling…
  • Coma alarm dreams

    vaughanbell
    13 Apr 2014 | 3:35 am
    Intensive Care Medicine has published a wonderfully written and vivid account from a teenager who spent time brain injured and hallucinating in an intensive care unit. The writer describes how he was admitted to intensive care at the age of 15 after suffering a head injury and had intense and bizarre hallucinations which are, as we know now, surprisingly common in critical care patients. My experience of the time under sedation can be split into two. There was what I could perceive of the real world around me, and then there was my dream world. In the real world, the most constant feature was…
  • Circumstances of the life and brain

    vaughanbell
    13 Apr 2014 | 2:40 am
    Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh has written a philosophical, incisive and exasperated book about brain surgery called Do No Harm. It’s a hugely entertaining read as Marsh takes us through the practical and emotional process of operating, or not operating, on patients with neurological disorders. He does a lot of moaning – about hospital management, computerisation, administration – sometimes quite enjoyably it must be said, but in some ways he does reflect the stereotype of the bellowing “I’ve got lives to save!” surgeon that stalks hospital corridors. Most…
 
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Why are scientists trying to map every single neuron in the brain?, Vox In The Popular Press: Antidepressant use in pregnancy linked to autism risk in boys: Study, CBS News A Patient's Bizarre Hallucination Points...
  • "Addiction, Compulsion, and Agency"

    NELB Staff
    16 Apr 2014 | 2:34 am
    "Addiction, Compulsion, and Agency" by Ezio Di Nucci has been published in the most recent issue of Neuroethics: Abstract I show that Pickard’s argument against the irresistibility of addiction fails because her proposed dilemma, according to which either drug-seeking does...
  • "Clinicians’ Attitudes toward Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: A Survey"

    NELB Staff
    14 Apr 2014 | 2:30 am
    "Clinicians’ Attitudes toward Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: A Survey" by Michele Farisco, et al., has been published in the most recent issue of Neuroethics: Abstract Notwithstanding fundamental methodological advancements, scientific information about disorders of consciousness (DOCs)—e.g. Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness...
  • " Painful Disparities, Painful Realities"

    NELB Staff
    11 Apr 2014 | 6:23 am
    Recently posted to SSRN (and published as a Univeristy of Maryland Legal Studies Research Paper): "Painful Disparities, Painful Realities" AMANDA C. PUSTILNIK, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law Legal doctrines and decisional norms treat chronic claims pain...
  • "Psychological Science's Replicability Crisis and What It Means for Science in the Courtroom"

    NELB Staff
    10 Apr 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Recently posted to SSRN (and forthcoming in the Journal of Psychology, Law, and Public Policy): "Psychological Science's Replicability Crisis and What It Means for Science in the Courtroom" JASON MICHAEL CHIN, University of Toronto - Faculty of Law In response...
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    Neuromarketing

  • Why You Are a Complete Idiot If You Don’t Google Yourself

    Roger Dooley
    16 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    The other day, I read a story at Fast Company titled Why You Should Google Yourself And Not Feel Guilty About It. I agreed with the reasoning of the author, Lindsay Lavine (@lindsaylavine), but was slightly puzzled by the “guilty” part. The headline was underscored by the opening sentence, “Admit it. You’ve Googled yourself, and [...]
  • Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation by Andy Beal

    Roger Dooley
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:36 am
    Book Review: Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation by Andy Beal In these days of heavy business books laden with theory, we still encounter a few that are short, action-oriented, and eminently practical. Andy Beal’s Repped is one such book. Beal offers readers a 30-day program to evaluate a company or individual’s online [...]
  • Killer Headlines: 3 Must-Read Posts, and More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    11 Apr 2014 | 8:07 am
    Here’s the best content we found this week! Want to help thousands of fellow readers? Share your own great find in a comment! 3 Ways To Create Killer Headlines Email is still the most reliable and effective way to reach your customers or prospects, but most emails don’t get opened. Even when they do get [...]
  • The Popcorn Effect: When Do Brand Ads Fail?

    John Carvalho
    7 Apr 2014 | 6:51 am
    Guest post by John Carvalho Neuromarketing readers are likely to be familiar with the idea of fluency, and its importance in how we target, craft, and deliver marketing messages that resonate with our audiences. Recall that human brains are wired to prefer things that are simple for us to process and we prefer that which [...]
  • How to Turn a Thank You into Higher Sales, and More: Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    4 Apr 2014 | 7:15 am
    Here’s some of the interesting stuff we’ve gathered during the last 7 days… add your own find in a comment! Have you ever arrived at a website and struggled to figure out what was going on, or what you were supposed to do? It can be hard to predict how visitors will react to your [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • To improve total health and fitness, let’s enhance brain functioning

    SharpBrains
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:58 am
    Surgeon general says brain health ‘new frontier’ (ARNEWS): “Brain health is the “new frontier” in science said Lt. Gen. Patricia D. Horoho as she kicked off a two-day consortium on the topic. Tapping into the full potential of the brain can have immense benefits for Soldiers, their families and the nation, said the Army’s surgeon general in opening remarks…The brain is the only organ in the human body that has self-awareness, she said. It has evolved the ability to predict threats and act proactively. “Ultimately, the decisions made by the brain impact our overall health and…
  • When was the last time you saw your brain? (That may change soon)

    SharpBrains
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:29 pm
    Flying Through Inner Space (National Geographic): “It’s hard to truly see the brain. I don’t mean to simply see a three-pound hunk of tissue. I mean to see it in a way that offers a deep feel for how it works. That’s not surprising, given that the human brain is made up of over 80 billion neurons, each branching out to form thousands of connections to other neurons…a number of neuroscientists are charting the brain now in ways that were impossible just a few years ago. And out of these surveys, an interesting new way to look at the brain is emerging. Call it the brain fly-through.
  • Combining Google Glass and mobile EEG headsets

    SharpBrains
    15 Apr 2014 | 10:17 am
    Personal Neuro Seeks to Combine Google Glass with EEG (Medgadget): “What do you get when you mix Google Glass and EEG? That’s the question that the people at Ottawa-based Personal Neuro (Devices) are on their way to answering…Medgadget: How does this compare to existing commercial EEG systems from companies such as Interaxon, NeuroSky, and Emotiv? Denison: PND has taken an “apps first” approach. Starting with developing apps for the first mobile EEG headset for Android & iPhone, the MindWave Mobile, PND has focused on 1) building neuroapps which incorporate PND algorithms and…
  • Is Autism Spectrum Disorder overdiagnosed?

    SharpBrains
    11 Apr 2014 | 7:01 am
    1 in 68 Children Now Has a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Why? (The Atlantic): “The staggering increase in cases of ASD should raise more suspicion in the medical community about its misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis than it does. The science stacks up in favor of catching and treating ASD earlier because it leads to better outcomes…What gets lost in the debate is an awareness of how the younger in age we assess for problems, the greater the potential a slow-to-mature kid will be given a false diagnosis. A 2007 study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that…
  • Accelerating brain health research via online registries

    SharpBrains
    10 Apr 2014 | 6:19 am
    San Francisco-based online ‘brain registry’ seeks volunteers to transform research (San Jose Mercury News): “By volunteering — repeatedly over time — participants join a pool of research subjects in the new Brain Health Registry, opened Tuesday, for studies on brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and other neurological ailments. You won’t learn your own scores; that disclosure could influence your future performance or trigger unwarranted “freak outs,” said UCSF’s Dr. Michael Weiner, founder of the…
 
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • Consciousness as Social Perception (BSP 108)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    15 Apr 2014 | 1:00 am
    Michal Graziano and Kevin (click image to play interview) In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is testable and it does fit our current knowledge of brain function.In a recent interview for the Brain Science Podcast (BSP 108), Graziano used the…
  • Sleep Science with Penny Lewis (BSP 107)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    18 Mar 2014 | 4:55 am
    Penny Lewis (click image to play interview) In The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest Dr. Penelope A. Lewis provides a highly readable account of the fascinating world of sleep research. Fascinating research is being carried out with animals as varied as fruit flies and rats, as well as with humans. I was surprised to learn that most people actually find it fairly easy to fall asleep in an fMRI scanner.I have just posted an interview with Dr. Lewis (BSP 107) that includes a discussion of the role of sleep in memory as well as interesting findings about how…
  • "The Cognitive-Emotional Brain" (BSP 106)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    17 Feb 2014 | 8:13 pm
    Luiz Pessoa of the University of Maryland In The Cognitive-Emotional Brain: From Interactions to Integration neuroscientist Luiz Pessoa argues that emotion and cognition are deeply intertwined throughout many levels of the brain. In a recent interview (BSP 106) Pessoa and I focused on recent discoveries about the amygdala and Thalamus that challenge traditional assumptions about what these structures do. The amygdala processes more than fear (and other negative stimuli) and the Thalamus is more than  a mere relay station.This a fairly technical discussion but Pessoa did a good job…
  • Brain Plasticity with Michael Merzenich (BSP 105)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    21 Jan 2014 | 1:00 am
                                  Michael Merzenich If you have read anything about brain plasticity you have seen the name Michael Merzenich. Dr. Merzenich is one of the pioneers in this field, having spent over 30 years documenting that the human brain (and that of other mammals) continues to change throughout life. I interviewed Dr. Merzenich several years ago (BSP 54), but the publication of his first book Soft-Wired: How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change Your Life gave us another opportunity to talk about…
  • BSP launches Premium Subscription

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    30 Dec 2013 | 1:35 pm
    Today I am launching the new Premium Subscription program for the Brain Science Podcast. This subscription will provide unlimited access to the entire library of Brain Podcast episodes and transcripts for only $5 per month. Individual episodes and transcripts are also available for sale here.All new episodes of the Brain Science Podcast will continue to be FREE as will the most recent 25 episodes. This represents about two years of free content. I am hopeful that this combination of free and premium content will allow me to continue to produce the Brain Science Podcast for many years to…
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Predicting Recovery from Coma

    Steven Novella
    17 Apr 2014 | 7:11 am
    I have been following the literature on using newer technologies (PET, fMRI, and quantitative EEG) to evaluate the brain activity of patients who appear unresponsive, loosely referred to as coma, or more generally disorders of consciousness. A new study, which I will get to below, adds an interesting element to the research. For background, disorders of consciousness result from brain injury or disease that affects either the brainstem (needed for arousal) and/or both brain hemispheres. Level of consciousness is a continuum from drowsy to brain dead, but for the purposes of this discussion I…
  • Why We Need a Skeptical Movement

    Steven Novella
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:24 am
    Skeptics tend (as they should) to question everything, even the need for a movement of self-identified skeptics. It is an interesting question – what is the net cultural effect of organized scientific skepticism? Of course, we can’t really ever know the answer to this question. There are too many moving parts. We could point to cultural trends, but this is probably the worst line of evidence. There is no way to control for skepticism as an isolated variable. We have no way of knowing what the world would be like without organized skepticism. We can point to individuals whose lives…
  • Navy Process to Make Fuel from Seawater

    Steven Novella
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:56 am
    Researchers at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) announced that they have successfully tested a process to convert seawater into jet fuel. They can extract CO2 both dissolved and bound from the water as a source of carbon, and can extract H2 through electrolysis. They then convert the CO2 and hydrogen into long chain hydrocarbons: NRL has made significant advances in the development of a gas-to-liquids (GTL) synthesis process to convert CO2 and H2 from seawater to a fuel-like fraction of C9-C16 molecules. In the first patented step, an iron-based catalyst has been developed that can…
  • NECSS 2014

    Steven Novella
    10 Apr 2014 | 4:03 am
    I will be at NECSS this weekend – the Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism, in New York City. This is an excellent conference full of science and critical thinking lectures and panels. My podcast, the SGU, will be recording a live show on stage Saturday. I will also be running two 1-hour workshops on critical thinking on Friday. I will be moderating a panel debate on GMO which should be very exciting. Finally I will be on a neuroscience panel talking about the uses and abuses of neuroscience. Our keynote this year is Lawrence Krauss. You can see the full line up of speakers at…
  • Geocentrism – Seriously?

    Steven Novella
    8 Apr 2014 | 5:08 am
    I just saw the trailer of a new movie, The Principle. The movie is produced by Robert Sungenis, who writes the blog Galileo Was Wrong. Sungenis is what we technically call a kook. He believes the earth is at the center of the universe and that there was no Jewish holocaust, but rather the Jews were conspiring with Satan to take over the world. Sungenis, however, is apparently a kook with money, so he is making a documentary film preaching his bizarre notions to the world. This much is nothing new. There are plenty of such films out there, like What the Bleep Do We Know and Expelled. They…
 
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    neuroscience « WordPress.com Tag Feed

  • Marianne Dieterich

    churchlandlab
    14 Apr 2014 | 6:57 am
    Marianne Dieterich (Univ. Munich) Vestibular disorders in humans
  • Anna Nobre Neural mechanisms of visual attention and visual memory

    churchlandlab
    14 Apr 2014 | 6:45 am
    Anna Nobre (Oxford) Neural mechanisms of visual attention and visual memory
  • Don’t Be Mistaken: You are in control!

    MK
    14 Apr 2014 | 5:57 am
    There are many disputes around how much we are in control of our lives. Some say we have no free wil
  • Descartes, Aristotle, and Terri Schiavo

    Myers
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:16 am
    Did Descartes doom Terri Schiavo?  “The plea … to prolong Ms. Schiavo’s feeding, against the wishes of her husband or what courts determined to be her own expressed inclinations, echoed the teachings of Aristotle, who considered existence itself to be inviolable. On the other side, the argument that Ms. Schiavo’s life could be judged as not worth living echoed Descartes, the Enlightenment philosopher who defined human life not as biological existence – which might be an inviolable gift from God – but as consciousness, about which people can make…
  • Memories in the Making; Neuroscientists Observe Memory Formation

    projectscienceandreason
    14 Apr 2014 | 3:21 am
    Originally posted on Glen Carrigan - Homoscientificus: For the first time in history, neuroscientists are observing memory formation and transmission around the brain of a mammal. Developing on advances in the field of RNA research , this astounding discovery really does reveal how this particular function of the brain might work. Memory is a complex cognitive process comprising many different facets. Before we have a memory (that which we can reconstruct) it has to be encoded in the brain in some way. This is an ever-changing process that is not entirely understood but what we do know is…
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • Limb and Trunk Mechanisms for Balance Control during Locomotion in Quadrupeds

    Musienko, P. E., Deliagina, T. G., Gerasimenko, Y. P., Orlovsky, G. N., Zelenin, P. V.
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    In quadrupeds, the most critical aspect of postural control during locomotion is lateral stability. However, neural mechanisms underlying lateral stability are poorly understood. Here, we studied lateral stability in decerebrate cats walking on a treadmill with their hindlimbs. Two destabilizing factors were used: a brief lateral push of the cat and a sustained lateral tilt of the treadmill. It was found that the push caused considerable trunk bending and twisting, as well as changes in the stepping pattern, but did not lead to falling. Due to postural reactions, locomotion with normal body…
  • In Sync: Metaphor, Mechanism or Marker of Mutual Understanding?

    Stolk, A.
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
  • Different Neuronal Computations of Spatial Working Memory for Multiple Locations within versus across Visual Hemifields

    Matsushima, A., Tanaka, M.
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Spatial working memory is one of the most studied cognitive functions, serving as a model system to decipher computational principles of the brain. Although neuronal mechanisms for remembering a single location have been well elucidated, little is known about memory for multiple locations. Here, we examined the activities of prefrontal neurons during monkeys remembered positions of one or two visual cue(s). When the two cues were presented across the left and right visual fields, neurons exhibited a comparable response to the activity for the preferred cue presented alone. When the two cues…
  • Seeing Scenes: Topographic Visual Hallucinations Evoked by Direct Electrical Stimulation of the Parahippocampal Place Area

    Megevand, P., Groppe, D. M., Goldfinger, M. S., Hwang, S. T., Kingsley, P. B., Davidesco, I., Mehta, A. D.
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    In recent years, functional neuroimaging has disclosed a network of cortical areas in the basal temporal lobe that selectively respond to visual scenes, including the parahippocampal place area (PPA). Beyond the observation that lesions involving the PPA cause topographic disorientation, there is little causal evidence linking neural activity in that area to the perception of places. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings to delineate place-selective cortex in a patient implanted with stereo-EEG electrodes for presurgical…
  • A Neural Code for Looming and Receding Motion Is Distributed over a Population of Electrosensory ON and OFF Contrast Cells

    Clarke, S. E., Longtin, A., Maler, L.
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Object saliency is based on the relative local-to-background contrast in the physical signals that underlie perceptual experience. As such, contrast-detecting neurons (ON/OFF cells) are found in many sensory systems, responding respectively to increased or decreased intensity within their receptive field centers. This differential sensitivity suggests that ON and OFF cells initiate segregated streams of information for positive and negative sensory contrast. However, while recording in vivo from the ON and OFF cells of Apteronotus leptorhynchus, we report that the reversal of stimulus motion…
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    Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

  • Maybe Your Kids Don't Want To Play Sports

    9 Apr 2014 | 7:54 pm
    Has this happened to you?  Your daughter comes home from soccer practice and defiantly declares, “I can’t stand my coach, my team is awful and I don’t even like soccer.  I quit!”  Your parental thermostat kicks in as you try to gently lower the temperature in the room with those responses that all kids despise, “Oh, come on now, it can’t be that bad” or “But you’re good at soccer” and finally, “You know our rule, once you start something, you have to finish it. You can’t quit.”You’ll talk to her coach, you’ll buy her new cleats, even get her on a…
  • Achieving The Rise Of Flow: An Interview With Steven Kotler

    20 Mar 2014 | 7:57 pm
    Ted LigetyTwo years before he stood on the Sochi Olympics podium with a gold medal around his neck, alpine skier Ted Ligety took a trip to Alaska.  There was no qualifying race or Team USA training session, but rather a heli-skiing trek in the Chugach Mountains with a film crew from Warren Miller Entertainment.  The risk level was high, even for one of the best skiers in the world.  But that's what keeps the best on the knife's edge balance of skill and fear.  To survive requires being in the state of Flow."The Flow State is a place where the impossible becomes possible,…
  • How To Measure An Athlete's Intangibles

    13 Mar 2014 | 12:34 pm
    Dr. Bob Schafer (seated) of Prophecy Sciences at SSAC14One of the unmistakable takeaways from the recent MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference is that teams across all sports are looking for the “next big thing” that will offer a competitive advantage.  For most of the 2,000 attendees at this year’s event, the holy grail was assumed to be buried somewhere in the Big Data world of sports statistics and their endless permutations and combinations.  Unfortunately, data of any kind represents the past rather than a true prediction of your team’s future performance. Stats can…
  • Why NFL Combine Results For Jadeveon Clowney And Johnny Manziel Don't Matter

    2 Mar 2014 | 6:25 am
    Jadeveon Clowney at 2014 NFL Scouting CombineWith the Olympics over and the NBA and NHL not yet into playoff mode, the NFL knows its fans need a shot of football in late winter. To prepare us (and the team general managers and coaches) for the NFL Draft in early May, 300 of the best college football players visited Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis last week for the annual NFL Scouting Combine.While there are specific drills that the players go through for each position, it is the six workout drills, testing strength, agility, jumping and speed, that generate the most TV coverage and…
  • World Class Conditioning Will Be Key To World Cup Success

    19 Feb 2014 | 5:18 pm
    U.S. Head Coach Jürgen KlinsmannJürgen Klinsmann understands what it takes to compete in a World Cup.  With eleven goals for the German national team across the 1990, 1994 and 1998 tournaments, he is still the sixth leading goalscorer in World Cup history. As he prepares the U.S. men’s national team for this year’s trip to Brazil, his message of preparation begins with world-class fitness.  Now, a new research review from three sports scientists confirms Klinsmann’s obsession with being in top condition.“The level in the World Cup is two or three levels higher, and…
 
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    Brain Posts

  • Religious Belief and Depression Resilience

    15 Apr 2014 | 8:43 am
    Identifying risk factors for brain disorders is a key element in clinical research.Understanding protective or resilience factors for brain disorders is also important and receiving increased attention in clinical research.Factors that promote resilience to brain disorders may come from a variety of domains. Religious belief is one domain receiving attention as a potential resilience factor.Miller and colleagues recently published a longitudinal study of religious belief and risk for major depression.The key elements of research design in their study included:Subjects: This study…
  • The Genetics of Religious Belief

    7 Apr 2014 | 8:37 am
    In the next few posts, I will review some of the recent brain-related research related to religious belief.Religious belief and religious affiliation run in families. This effect is not surprising as parents influence their children's type of religious experience during development.However, there is increasing evidence that adult religious belief and behavior is also influenced by genetic factors independent of family environment experience.Twin studies represent a powerful research model to tease out genetic from environmental influences. Twin studies exam differences in concordance rate…
  • Is Insomnia Relief Just a Mouse Click Away?

    27 Mar 2014 | 9:51 am
    Cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBT-I) is increasingly recognized as an important treatment option.However, in some regions of the U.S. and the world, access to this type of therapy is limited and may be cost prohibitive.A recent review of the diagnosis and treatment of insomnia noted the promise of internet-based CBT-I. The promise of internet-based CBT-I is based on several randomized controlled trials.Ritterband and colleagues published a study 44 subjects randomized to internet-based CBT-I or a wait list.  The primary outcome measure in this study was the…
  • When Sleeping Pills Don't Work

    25 Mar 2014 | 8:08 am
    Hypnotics or sleeping pills typically are effective and indicated as an option for the short-term relief of transient insomnia.However, a minority of individuals report persistent insomnia and lack of sleep despite use of a hypnotic.When drugs that typically treat a disorder fail to work, it is important to reconsider the accuracy of the diagnosis.Yun Li and colleagues from China recently published a case report illustrating this issue in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.They reported on a 57 year old women who suffered from insomnia for over ten years.  During this period, she had…
  • Naptime Stories Boost Word Learning in Children

    19 Mar 2014 | 9:01 am
    Sleep is known to have a beneficial effect on the consolidation of memory.There have been few studies to demonstrate how this effect my be utilized.Williams and Horst recently tested the effect of storybook reading, sleep and word learning in group of 3 year old children.Their study recently published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology randomized 48 three year old children into four groups:Group one: children were read the same story before a napsGroup two: children were read different stories before napsGroup three: children were read the same story without a following napGroup four:…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • Ugandan Men Face Life Sentence in Trial on Homosexuality Charges

    The Guardian
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:09 am
    Source: The GuardianKim Mukisa and Jackson Mukasa face life imprisonment if found guilty in first such case since introduction of new anti-gay law Two Ugandan men will go on trial next month accused of homosexuality, the first people to be charged since a controversial new anti-gay law was passed. Prosecutors said on Wednesday that they had sufficient evidence against Kim Mukisa and Jackson Mukasa, who denied the charges when they first appeared in court earlier...
  • Unhappy Meal: McDonald's Foreign Workers Call It "Slavery"

    Canadian Broadcasting Company - Top Stories News
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Source: Canadian Broadcasting Company - Top Stories NewsForeign workers recruited from Belize are accusing McDonald’s Canada of treating them like ‘slaves,' by effectively forcing them to share an expensive apartment – then deducting almost half their take-home pay as rent.
  • Highly Masculine Boys and Feminine Girls May Be at Greater Cancer Risk

    ScienceDaily
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Source: ScienceDailyThe most “feminine” girls and “masculine” boys are more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers.
  • Male University Workers Sue Over Alleged Sex Discrimination

    The Guardian
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Source: The GuardianMaintenance staff members at University of Wales Trinity Saint David say they are paid less than female equivalents Twenty-six men working at a university in Wales are suing their employers for more than £700,000 over allegations of sex discrimination and unequal pay. The men, caretakers and tradesman employed by the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, say they have been paid less than female employees in equivalent posts for seven years.
  • Ethiopian Government Cancels Anti-Gay Rally

    The Guardian
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Source: The GuardianHomosexuality 'not a serious crime' says government official, in country where gay sex punishable by 15 years in prison A planned anti-gay rally in Ethiopia has been cancelled by the government, according to officials. In addition, a plan by the legislature to add gay sex to a list of crimes ineligible for presidential pardons has been dropped, according to Redwan Hussein, an Ethiopian government spokesman. Continue reading...
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    The Neurocritic

  • Let's play "Guess the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Speaker" (soundbytes from #cns2014)

    11 Apr 2014 | 8:04 pm
    Another CNS meeting, another series of delayed blog posts from The Neurocritic. Long in the vanguard of the slow blogging movement, these conference recaps have attained the cult status of unplanned obsolescence.Without further ado, let's begin our walk down memory lane...The 21st Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting was held in Boston from April 48, 2014. We'll kick off our recapping festivities with a contest of "Name that Soundbyte!" from an invited symposium on how developmental cognitive neuroscience can (and cannot) inform policy.Invited Symposium Session 1Sunday, April 6 3:00…
  • Contest to Reduce Implicit Racial Bias Shows Empathy and Perspective-Taking Don't Work

    30 Mar 2014 | 3:46 pm
    NCAA college basketball isn't the only hot competition involving a team from the University of Virginia.  UVa Psychology Professor Brian Nosek is one of three founders of Project Implicit, a collaborative nonprofit dedicated to the study of implicit social cognition — how unconscious thoughts and feelings can influence attitudes and behavior.Prof Nosek is also heavily involved in the Open Science and Replication movements. Along with graduate student Calvin Lai, he led a multinational group of 22 other researchers in a competition to see who could devise the best…
  • Hippocampal Pathology in California Sea Lions with Domoic Acid-Induced Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    23 Mar 2014 | 9:00 pm
    In 1987, over 100 Canadians became ill after eating cultivated mussels from Prince Edward Island. Symptoms included the typical gastrointestinal issues, but serious neurological findings such as disorientation, confusion, and memory loss were also observed (Perl et al., 1990). In the worst cases, the patients developed seizures or went into coma. Three elderly people died. The cognitive changes were persistent, and had not resolved within a two year follow-up.The toxin was identified as domoic acid, which received the…
  • Brains on Film: In the Scanner (featuring Sophie Scott and the Dead Salmon)

    14 Mar 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Everyone knows the hazards of bringing metal objects into the MRI scanner room (right?). Now we have a lovely musical reminder of why this is such a bad idea...In the Scanner is an entry in the Brains on Film contest, a Brain Awareness Week event sponsored by the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. The film was made by Sophie Meekings, Dana Boebinger and Nadine Lavan. Featuring Lucy's amazing voice, a spoken word introduction by Professor Sophie Scott, and a cameo appearance by none other than the Atlantic salmon — of “oh yes you…
  • Warning about Ketamine in the American Journal of Psychiatry

    5 Mar 2014 | 2:55 am
    The dissociative anesthetic and ravey club drug ketamine has been hailed as a possible “miracle” cure for depression. In contrast to the delayed action of standard antidepressants such as SSRIs, the uplifting effects of Special K are noticeable within an hour. “Experimental Medication Kicks Depression in Hours Instead of Weeks,” says the National Institute of Mental Health. NIMH has been bullish on ketamine for years now. Prominent researchers Duman and Aghajanian called it the “the most important discovery in half a century” in a recent Science review.But in 2010, I pondered…
 
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    The Beautiful Brain

  • Science on Screen

    Ben Ehrlich
    27 Mar 2014 | 3:12 pm
    On March 31st, seventeen independent theaters in cities across the country will host Science on Screen, an evening pairing mainstream film and scientific presentation. Supported by the Coolidge Corner Theater and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Science on Screen will feature different programs nationwide If you live in New York City, for example, Brooklyn’s BAM is showing Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, followed by a discussion of emotion and memory with Joseph LeDoux, director of the Emotional Brain Institute at New York University. See if your local theater is…
  • Fridtjof the Great

    Ben Ehrlich
    24 Feb 2014 | 8:29 pm
    I never knew about Fridtjof Nansen. His 1887 doctoral thesis argued for the independence of the nerve cell, making him one of the earliest defenders of what would be called “the neuron doctrine.” He promptly quit neuroscience and went on an arctic expedition across Greenland. Then he went to the North Pole. He topped it all off with a Nobel Peace Prize, after serving his native Norway in the League of Nations for a decade. His lasting legacy, however, is probably the “Nansen passport” for stateless persons, still recognized by over fifty countries. “It is better…
  • Art and the Default Mode Network

    Noah Hutton
    16 Feb 2014 | 11:37 pm
    A recent symposium presented by Columbia and NYU explored what happens in our brains when we’re at rest, and why those same brain regions are crucial when we view art. “It’s not about merging disciplines,” David Freedberg told a crowd gathered at NYU’s Silver Center for Arts and Science last week, “it’s about listening.” Freedberg, an eminent art historian who serves as the director if the Italian Academy at Columbia University, was speaking about the alternately tense and productive relationship between the humanities and neurosciences. This is an intersection that he…
  • 2014 Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics

    Noah Hutton
    10 Jan 2014 | 12:31 pm
    This just in from the IAEA– not the International Atomic Energy Association, but rather the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics. They will be holding their 2014 summit in NYC in August, and have issued an open call for abstracts, as well as artistic submissions. Researchers who wish to present their artworks will have an opportunity to speak about their work at the IAEA event as well. The 2014 IAEA Congress is an opportunity for researchers and scholars from different domains and countries to present and share empirical research on aesthetics, creativity, and the…
  • Interesting New Autism Research

    Sam McDougle
    6 Nov 2013 | 9:52 pm
    A new research article, published online for the journal Nature, shows that infants who were later diagnosed with autism spent significantly less time focusing on people’s eyes than infants who were not later diagnosed. Warren R. Jones and Ami Klin, of Emory University, co-authored the paper. The New York Times recently ran a feature on the research, which discusses the implications for early brain development and improvements in autism diagnostics. If you’d like to look at how this line of research potentially relates to some broader theory in the field of autism research, one…
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    The Neurocritic

  • Let's play "Guess the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Speaker" (soundbytes from #cns2014)

    The Neurocritic
    11 Apr 2014 | 8:04 pm
    Another CNS meeting, another series of delayed blog posts from The Neurocritic. Long in the vanguard of the slow blogging movement, these conference recaps have attained the cult status of unplanned obsolescence.Without further ado, let's begin our walk down memory lane...The 21st Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting was held in Boston from April 48, 2014. We'll kick off our recapping festivities with a contest of "Name that Soundbyte!" from an invited symposium on how developmental cognitive neuroscience can (and cannot) inform policy.Invited Symposium Session 1Sunday, April 6 3:00…
  • Contest to Reduce Implicit Racial Bias Shows Empathy and Perspective-Taking Don't Work

    The Neurocritic
    30 Mar 2014 | 3:46 pm
    NCAA college basketball isn't the only hot competition involving a team from the University of Virginia.  UVa Psychology Professor Brian Nosek is one of three founders of Project Implicit, a collaborative nonprofit dedicated to the study of implicit social cognition — how unconscious thoughts and feelings can influence attitudes and behavior.Prof Nosek is also heavily involved in the Open Science and Replication movements. Along with graduate student Calvin Lai, he led a multinational group of 22 other researchers in a competition to see who could devise the best…
  • Hippocampal Pathology in California Sea Lions with Domoic Acid-Induced Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    The Neurocritic
    23 Mar 2014 | 9:00 pm
    In 1987, over 100 Canadians became ill after eating cultivated mussels from Prince Edward Island. Symptoms included the typical gastrointestinal issues, but serious neurological findings such as disorientation, confusion, and memory loss were also observed (Perl et al., 1990). In the worst cases, the patients developed seizures or went into coma. Three elderly people died. The cognitive changes were persistent, and had not resolved within a two year follow-up.The toxin was identified as domoic acid, which received the…
  • Brains on Film: In the Scanner (featuring Sophie Scott and the Dead Salmon)

    The Neurocritic
    14 Mar 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Everyone knows the hazards of bringing metal objects into the MRI scanner room (right?). Now we have a lovely musical reminder of why this is such a bad idea...In the Scanner is an entry in the Brains on Film contest, a Brain Awareness Week event sponsored by the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. The film was made by Sophie Meekings, Dana Boebinger and Nadine Lavan. Featuring Lucy's amazing voice, a spoken word introduction by Professor Sophie Scott, and a cameo appearance by none other than the Atlantic salmon — of “oh yes you…
  • Warning about Ketamine in the American Journal of Psychiatry

    The Neurocritic
    5 Mar 2014 | 2:55 am
    The dissociative anesthetic and ravey club drug ketamine has been hailed as a possible “miracle” cure for depression. In contrast to the delayed action of standard antidepressants such as SSRIs, the uplifting effects of Special K are noticeable within an hour. “Experimental Medication Kicks Depression in Hours Instead of Weeks,” says the National Institute of Mental Health. NIMH has been bullish on ketamine for years now. Prominent researchers Duman and Aghajanian called it the “the most important discovery in half a century” in a recent Science review.But in 2010, I pondered…
 
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • The Collective Intelligence of Human Groups

    Bruno Dubuc
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:16 am
    In psychology, the concept of general intelligence in individuals and the use of IQ tests to measure it are controversial topics, to say the least. One frequently cited piece of evidence for the existence of such intelligence is that this single variable predicts from one-third to one-half of individuals’ scores on a variety of distinct cognitive tasks. In a study published in the journal Science in October 2010, psychologists from three U.S. universities reported that they had discovered a factor that they called collective intelligence and that is similar to general intelligence but…
  • Will You Be the Same Person in 10 Years As You are Now?

    Bruno Dubuc
    31 Mar 2014 | 12:24 pm
    Our thought processes are far from being as reliable and logical as we often think they are. In reality, our brains are constantly playing tricks on us, ranging from simple optical illusions to change blindness and other cognitive biases to the illusion that the self is a continuous entity that has the experiences that make up our lives. Scientists are discovering more and more ways in which the brain fails to operate according to the simple common sense that we would expect. One notable example is the way that we perceive ourselves over time. In this regard, a study published in the…
  • Science Starting To Identify the Molecular Bases of the Sense of Touch

    Bruno Dubuc
    17 Mar 2014 | 12:23 pm
    When it comes to senses such as vision, scientists have known for some time which molecules are responsible for transduction—the conversion of physical stimuli into nerve impulses. Until recently, however, the molecular bases of the sene of touch remained ill-defined. But in an article first published online in the journal Nature in December 2012, DrZhiqiang Yan and his research team from the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) reported having found what they believed was the missing link in transduction for the sense of touch. This link is NOMPC (No mechanoreceptor potential…
  • The Various Speeds at Which We Perceive Time

    Bruno Dubuc
    3 Mar 2014 | 1:44 pm
    Our perception of how fast time passes is amazingly subjective. When we are children, our summer vacations from school seem to stretch on forever. When we are grownups, we are often surprised to realize how long it has been since some major event occurred—Hurricane Katrina was over eight years ago, and the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl almost 28 years ago! Thus we frequently underestimate or overestimate elapsed time. But what are the factors that push our estimates in one direction or the other? Are there some time scales that are affected and others that are not? Are there certain areas…
  • Lasting Effects of Meditation

    Bruno Dubuc
    18 Feb 2014 | 9:31 am
    A brain-imaging study published in the November 2012 issue of the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience seems to confirm past brain-imaging studies which found that meditation can help people pay better attention and manage stress more effectively. But the November 2012 study goes a bit further: it also shows that such measurable positive effects of meditation seem to continue even when the individual in question is not meditating. The November 2012 study looked at the effects of two different kinds of meditation on the ability to manage one’s emotions. It compared two groups of…
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    Bioassociate Industry Blog

  • Latest Bioassociate for SeekingAlpha: Tonix's Clinical-Stage Drug, TNX-102SL, Is Completely Unneeded

    Julia Skripka-Serry
    29 Mar 2014 | 3:46 am
    Below is Bioassociate's latest article for SeekingAlpha, "Tonix's Clinical-Stage Drug, TNX-102SL, Is Completely Unneeded", tell us what you think!SummaryTonix Pharmaceuticals' clinical-stage product - TNX-102SL is a disintegrating sublingual tablet containing a very low dose of cyclobenzaprine, targeted for bedtime administration for the treatment of Fibromyalgia.TNXP was a sub-$5 stock following its recent NASDAQ up-listing until a series of articles drove a stock price rally, regardless of any real fundamental advancements or news.Tonix's reformulated cyclobenzaprine doesn't provide any…
  • Bioassociate Reiterates BUY Recommendation on RedHill Biopharma

    Julia Skripka-Serry
    11 Feb 2014 | 5:24 am
    In a report published on February 9, 2014, Bioassociate reiterated a Buy rating on RedHill Biopharma (NASDAQ: RDHL) (TASE: RDHL.TA), and set an ADS price target of $18.1. The report contains a detailed discussion of RedHill's pipeline advancements during the preceding months and adjusted cash flows.The Update Report is available at:http://www.bioassociate.com/redhill-biopharma-ltd-feb-5-2014-update-report/In the report, Bioassociate noted, "RedHill Biopharma has initiated late-stage clinical studies in the company's two leading programs - RHB-104 for the treatment of Crohn's Disease and…
  • Biotech & Pharma 2013 Licensing & Partnering Activity Review: Diminishing Upfronts, Increasing Platform Licenses Indicate Stronger Risk Aversion among Big Pharma

    Julia Skripka-Serry
    19 Jan 2014 | 9:14 am
    Let’s face it: everyone finally realized that Pharma’s traditional business model was only as good as the piles of money thrown at it every year. Now that players are feeling the pinch of financial crises and therapeutic droughts, some ingenious dynamics are beginning to play out on the dealmaking landscape. And to begin with, the bulky, disincentivized and unproductive in-house R&D monster is going away forever, leaving behind a legacy of chronic phobia of go-it-alone risky drug development ventures. So what is replacing the cumbersome in-house R&D? Risk-diluting options are.
  • Bioassociate wishes you a very happy 2014!

    Julia Skripka-Serry
    3 Jan 2014 | 5:43 am
  • 2013 Biotech & Pharma IPO Review – Most Popular Therapeutic trends, Trending Clinical Stages and post-IPO Winners & Losers

    Julia Skripka-Serry
    14 Dec 2013 | 5:52 am
    2013 was generally a good year for the markets (and underwriters!). The S&P 500 is up 26% on this time last year, with the NASDAQ composite running slightly higher at 30% - but not even close to the stellar 56% performance of the Biotech Index (fig 1). In fact, few events in other industries could compete with the Great Biotech IPO Fever of 2013, when the IPO conveyor belt went full overdrive, churning out an average of four biotechs a month into the public domain.Figure 1. Performance of the NASDAQ composite Index, the S&P500 and the NASDAQ Biotech Index, Dec 11, 2012 – Dec 11,…
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    Synaesthesia Discovery

  • Development of Synaesthesia through Dramatic Experiences

    Spring
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:41 am
    We were standing in front of a massive heritage home. It was like a medieval castle, but with a touch of French flavour. The structure was over powering us. The noise from the busy traffic was no longer noticeable. The agent came through the old heavy front door, and greeted us warmly. “Before we start, I have to warn you. The current lady owner is unwell. She can hardly manage this house. The house is not in a crispy condition. You will find it dirty and untidy.” That has explained the neglected yard, and the completely inaccessible side door, that was covered by overgrown grass,…
  • Rite of Passage: Synaesthesia and Love

    Spring
    7 Apr 2014 | 6:31 am
    Skye’s heart missed a beat at the sight of a gorgeous looking girl. A synaesthetic colourful ribbon was twirling around her with the colours changing and moving, just like how Skye sees beautiful music through his synaesthetic perception. Skye has a romantic soul. The curiosity in girls started early which was not surprising. One day when he was six, he asked Thomas to guess how many people would be living in his house when he was a grown-up. Before Thomas could answer, Skye said, “Four! My wife and I with our two children, a boy and a girl.” Over the years, there have been…
  • Time Travel Synaesthesia – Past, Present and Future

    Spring
    28 Mar 2014 | 6:04 am
    Skye and Thomas have been dreaming about inventing a time machine since they were very young. They often talk about their time travel ideas. A major triggering point of their time machine concept was the fear of death. Both thought if they could invent a time machine, none of us would die. I also think the idea was manifested by their strong time-space synaesthesia. One of children’s favourite cartoon shows is Regular Show. They were absolutely hooked by it. I didn’t realise that the real reason behind children’s love of Regular Show was the time machines portrayed in the…
  • Moving Pictures – Motion to Coloured Driver Synaesthesia

    Spring
    15 Mar 2014 | 3:42 am
    Today reminds me of the day when I first discovered my son Skye’s in-depth synaesthesia. The indescribable feeling on that day came back so vividly after the discovery of my children’s motion to coloured driver synaesthesia. Thomas went out with his grandfather on their usual weekend bus and train trip this morning. After I picked him up from the railway station in the afternoon, we had our usual chat about his day in the car. Thomas then asked me what Skye and I did today while he was out. “We went for a walk. Oh there was something amazing. Skye told me about his…
  • Perception – People Synaesthesia

    Spring
    5 Mar 2014 | 4:33 am
    Sivananda Saraswati, a Hindu spiritual teacher, who wrote nearly 300 books on yoga and a range of subjects, gave a philosophical view of perception in his “Sure Ways of Success in Life”. The senses are the gatekeepers of the wonderful factory of the mind. They bring into the mental factory matter for manufacture. Light vibrations, sound vibrations, and the like, are brought inside through these avenues. The sensations are first converted into percepts by the mind, which then presents these percepts to the intellect. The intellect converts these percepts into concepts or ideas. The…
 
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    The Daily Neuron

  • What is an Organ?

    narjissarahzaidi@gmail.com
    25 Mar 2014 | 8:48 am
    vinyl figure organ donors by David Foox via street anatomy.com In our previous discussion of renewal we talked about how our body renews itself from within at a cellular level, regardless of whether we want to or not. Understanding the basics of how our body works is something that we should all have an idea of. After all it is the place that you spend most of your time in right? At the very core of our body is the cell. The cell is the source of all activity within ourselves, it in fact actually has a very busy life within itself as well, (how cellular energy is derived and DNA), but for now…
  • The Impact of Owning a Home Later in Life

    narjissarahzaidi@gmail.com
    24 Mar 2014 | 9:21 am
    building in Denmark, image by Tyler Falk via HUD.gov Remember back in elementary school, when every little thing seemed like it was the end of the world? When we are young everything seems a lot bigger than it actually is, from adults, to physical objects (buildings/statues), to events, however as we age our perspectives align with reality a lot more (at least for most people). The good news is that along with age comes a reduction in anxiety and fear, however it appears that it is contingent on certain factors, one of which is housing. A new study released discusses how owning a home in old…
  • Does it Matter When You Eat?

    narjissarahzaidi@gmail.com
    21 Mar 2014 | 9:51 am
    via sgag Once you start to work out, or move around a bit more than the usual amount, you start to become aware of other things that you should do. For the record some of us are martial arts experts so are quite familiar with intense training, nevertheless, when you start to become active, it is important that we make other slight adjustments in our lives as well. For example increasing the amount of fluids that we drink, especially if you live in a hot, humid, sauna is always a good idea. Also you should incorporate certain foods into your diet, to help you recover and build muscle. Finding…
  • First Day of Spring, Time to Renew

    narjissarahzaidi@gmail.com
    20 Mar 2014 | 9:30 am
    courtesy of minnie-on-focus via tumblr When you woke up this morning, did you notice anything different? Well today is the first day of spring, and although it appears to be exactly like yesterday, it is not, because it is the start of a new season, one which symbolizes renewal and new life. If you are in the North, and stuck in the middle of a snowstorm you may not feel this way, or if you are in the South and stuck in the middle of a hot sunny day you may not either, but regardless it is the start of a whole new section of the year, according to the schedule that is most important, the one…
  • Establishing Good Habits For Getting Around

    narjissarahzaidi@gmail.com
    19 Mar 2014 | 9:05 am
    You are certainly not rigid in your ways, no, you are educated and open minded, you seek adventure and have no problems with trying new things, well unless they are too different from what you normally do of course. Patterns of behavior are actually not that easy to change, not because it is hard for us to do different things but because our mindset prevents us from changing what we normally do. Is there a certain route that you always take to get to work? Don’t you find yourself always taking that same route over and over again, even if there are other options, and sometimes you might…
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    Your Brain Health

  • Are you afraid of happiness? Take the quiz and find out.

    Sarah McKay
    10 Apr 2014 | 3:03 am
    Underlying most of the traditional research on happiness is the assumption that personal happiness is a valuable goal that should be actively pursued.You’re not ‘happy’?  Well, that‘s a cause for concern! UNhappiness, on the other hand, is to be prevented, avoided or eliminated at all costs. Many people look to self-help, coaching or therapy because […]The post Are you afraid of happiness? Take the quiz and find out. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Neuroscience facts to blow your mind [infographic]

    Sarah McKay
    3 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Thanks to Visually for this fascinating infographic.  The post Neuroscience facts to blow your mind [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • April Walking Book Club: Thrive by Arianna Huffington

    Sarah McKay
    31 Mar 2014 | 1:00 am
    Our eulogies celebrate our lives very differently from the way society defines success. They don’t commemorate our long hours in the office, our promotions, or our sterling PowerPoint presentations as we relentlessly raced to climb up the career ladder. They are not about our resumes – they are about cherished memories, shared adventures, small kindnesses and […]The post April Walking Book Club: Thrive by Arianna Huffington appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Brain-immune communication: meet the expert Dr Mark Hutchinson.

    Sarah McKay
    27 Mar 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Meet Dr Mark Hutchinson.  Mark is an Australian Research Council Research Fellow in the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Adelaide where he has recently been appointed to Associate Professor.  Mark started his undergraduate studies at the University of Adelaide in 1996 and graduated with a BSc in 1998. He did honours in ‘99, a […]The post Brain-immune communication: meet the expert Dr Mark Hutchinson. appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • The neuroscience of how chronic pain rewires your brain [infographic]

    Sarah McKay
    25 Mar 2014 | 2:00 pm
    from Thanks to totalinjury.com for this informative infographicThe post The neuroscience of how chronic pain rewires your brain [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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