Neuroscience

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency and its Neurological Consequences

    Brain Blogger
    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    B complex vitamins are important for various functions of the human body. Be it energy production, body defense mechanisms, or red blood cell formation, the B group vitamins play pivotal roles and carry on the functions by working in tandem or all alone. Vitamin B12, in particular, has a great impact on neurological health. When it comes to neurological concerns, the vitamins B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), biotin, B6 (pyridoxine), folic acid and B12 (cobalamin) are especially important. These B group vitamins have specific effects on brain cell functions and their deficiency…
  • A Super-Simple Way to Make Your Prices Seem Lower… With One Catch

    Neuromarketing
    Roger Dooley
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:08 am
    Want to make your prices seem lower without actually changing them? Here's a research-based technique that will do exactly that, with one small catch... it doesn't work equally well for male and female customers!
  • Video game puzzle that improves executive function.

    Deric Bownds' MindBlog
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:33 am
    Maybe you don't have to pay brainhq.com or luminosity.com a monthly fee for brain exercises to improve your brain's executive functions. An iOS or Android App costing three dollars might do the job. Oei and Patterson make the interesting observation that executive function (making decision in rapidly changing circumstances) can be improved 30% by a video game (Cut the Rope) that requires physics-based puzzle solving but not by an action video game, a fast paced arcade game, or a real-time strategy game. Tests of executive function were administered before and a week after the game training.
  • Life purpose, longevity, and Alzheimers disease.

    Deric Bownds' MindBlog
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:14 am
    From Hill and Turiano: Having a purpose in life has been cited consistently as an indicator of healthy aging for several reasons, including its potential for reducing mortality risk. In the current study, we sought to extend previous findings by examining whether purpose in life promotes longevity across the adult years, using data from the longitudinal Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) sample. Proportional-hazards models demonstrated that purposeful individuals lived longer than their counterparts did during the 14 years after the baseline assessment, even when controlling for other…
  • Adding "neuro" to a word supposedly adds credibility but often signals neurohype

    Brains On Purpose™
    StephanieWestAllen
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:19 am
    Listen to Christian Jarrett, neuroscientist turned science writer, describing the many myths about the brain covered in today's media (kuow.org). The interview of Jarrett is less than 10 minutes long and worth a few minutes of your time. Jarrett has a new book coming out in the fall titled Great Myths of the Brain. I am looking forward to the...
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    Brains On Purpose™

  • Adding "neuro" to a word supposedly adds credibility but often signals neurohype

    StephanieWestAllen
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:19 am
    Listen to Christian Jarrett, neuroscientist turned science writer, describing the many myths about the brain covered in today's media (kuow.org). The interview of Jarrett is less than 10 minutes long and worth a few minutes of your time. Jarrett has a new book coming out in the fall titled Great Myths of the Brain. I am looking forward to the...
  • Seven challenges when using the neuroscience lens to see the world

    StephanieWestAllen
    10 Jun 2014 | 9:06 am
    Over the years, I have learned that people reading this blog come from a wide range of belief systems, including atheist, agnostic, and those involved to large or small degree in various spiritual and religious practices. Although this blog post to which I am linking today is written by a Christian and part of the post is from a Christian...
  • Wish to learn more about learning? Two new books on changing the brain through learning

    StephanieWestAllen
    3 Jun 2014 | 2:11 pm
    T-shirt from this year's APS conference Does resolving conflict require learning? Typically, yes, of course. If no one in the dispute learns anything new, the conflict will probably remain unresolved. That's one of the reasons learning is often mentioned here at BonP. In May, I attended the 26th annual convention of the Association of Psychological Science; some of the presentations...
  • Neuroscientist describes darker side of meditation to the Dalai Lama and he responds

    StephanieWestAllen
    9 May 2014 | 5:10 pm
    Click to watch Dr. Willoughby Britton talk to the Dalai Lama about her research on the negative effects of meditation. He responds that problems can occur when the practice is decontextualized and is not grounded in tradition, knowledge, ethics, and morality. So often today we see people blithely stripping off the practice from its tradition and using meditation for be-here-now,...
  • Evaluating science: The good, the bad, the iffy

    StephanieWestAllen
    30 Apr 2014 | 7:47 pm
    Everyday the media report science findings and the journals churn out research articles. In addition to feeling inundated, the lay reader may also wonder what's accurate and what's suspect and what's downright bogus. Here are three articles that can remind us to be discerning. First is an interview with neuroscience researcher Dr. Willoughby Britton. Although she is addressing the science...
 
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Volcanoes, Tree Rings, and Climate Models: This is how science works. [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:34 pm
    Mark Your Cosmic Calendar: 775/775 One wonders if anyone felt it. Did Charlemagne feel it as he led his forces across Pagan Saxon Westphalia, knocking down Irminsuls and making everyone pretend to be Christian or else? Did the people of Bagdad, just becoming the world’s largest city, notice anything aside from their own metro-bigness? Did the Abbasid Caliph Muhammad ibn Mansur al-Mahdi have the impression something cosmic was going on that year, other than his own ascendancy to power? Or was it mainly some of the Nitrogen molecules in the upper atmosphere that were changed, not forever but…
  • Botanical Wednesday: Maybe I should visit this place [Pharyngula]

    PZ Myers
    30 Jul 2014 | 6:24 pm
    Next week, I think I will! Oxford Botanical Garden
  • Some thoughts about mine safety penalties [The Pump Handle]

    Celeste Monforton, DrPH, MPH
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:38 pm
    Jessica Robinson at Northwest Public Radio reminds us today that penalties assessed are meaningless until they are paid. She updates us on the fatal injury death of silver miner Larry Marek, 53, who was killed in April 2011 at Hecla Mining’s Lucky Friday mine. Marek was killed by a massive rock fall. It took rescuers 10 days to recover his body. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) investigated the incident and socked the company with citations for “unwarrantable failures to comply” with ground support standards. The agency proposed penalties of nearly $360,000,…
  • On the ups and downs in biotech [Discovering Biology in a Digital World]

    Sandra Porter
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Living in Seattle fosters a certain pessimism when it comes to large companies.  Boeing has always been a poster child for employment uncertainty, regularly hiring large numbers of people and just as regularly, laying them off.  Now, we have Microsoft and Amgen joining the club, with Microsoft layoffs impacting an estimate 1350 people in the area, and Amgen, planning to shed 660 jobs when it closes facilities in Seattle and Bothell.  Sometimes as a biotech educator, it’s hard to reconcile the prospects of knowing we’re training students for well-paying, interesting biotech jobs,…
  • Occupational Health News Roundup [The Pump Handle]

    Kim Krisberg
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:21 am
    Fast food workers may have just received a huge boost, thanks to a ruling from the National Labor Relations Board. Steven Greenhouse reports in The New York Times that the board’s general counsel has ruled that McDonald’s is jointly responsible for labor violations at its franchises — “a decision that if upheld would disrupt longtime practices in the fast-food industry and ease the way for unionizing nationwide,” Greenhouse writes. The article reports that of the 181 unfair labor practice complaints filed against McDonald’s and its franchises in the last 20 months, the board’s…
 
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    Deric Bownds' MindBlog

  • Brain correlates of behaviors in market bubbles.

    30 Jul 2014 | 3:26 am
    Interesting...from Smith et al. a visualization of the part of our brains that seem to be saying "go for it" during a market bubble (and making less money) and another region that is saying "Whoa..." (whose activity is more prominent in successful traders who pull out of the market before the crash.) Groups of humans routinely misassign value to complex future events, especially in settings involving the exchange of resources. If properly structured, experimental markets can act as excellent probes of human group-level valuation mechanisms during pathological overvaluations—price bubbles.
  • A intriguing take on consciousness as a perceptual construct.

    29 Jul 2014 | 3:51 am
    A recent review by Aaron Schurger in Science Magazine pointed me to Michael Graziano's 2013 book "Consciousness and the Social Brain", which I immediately downloaded, read, and abstracted. Very engaging and clear writing (although I am dumbfounded that he makes no reference to Thomas Metzinger's work and 'ego tunnel' model, which has common elements with his own.) In Graziano's theory awareness is information, the brain's simplified, schematic model of the complicated, data-handling process of attention. A brain can use the construct of awareness to model its own attentional state or to model…
  • Video game puzzle that improves executive function.

    28 Jul 2014 | 3:33 am
    Maybe you don't have to pay brainhq.com or luminosity.com a monthly fee for brain exercises to improve your brain's executive functions. An iOS or Android App costing three dollars might do the job. Oei and Patterson make the interesting observation that executive function (making decision in rapidly changing circumstances) can be improved 30% by a video game (Cut the Rope) that requires physics-based puzzle solving but not by an action video game, a fast paced arcade game, or a real-time strategy game. Tests of executive function were administered before and a week after the game training.
  • Life purpose, longevity, and Alzheimers disease.

    25 Jul 2014 | 4:14 am
    From Hill and Turiano: Having a purpose in life has been cited consistently as an indicator of healthy aging for several reasons, including its potential for reducing mortality risk. In the current study, we sought to extend previous findings by examining whether purpose in life promotes longevity across the adult years, using data from the longitudinal Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) sample. Proportional-hazards models demonstrated that purposeful individuals lived longer than their counterparts did during the 14 years after the baseline assessment, even when controlling for other…
  • How do you get to Carnegie Hall?

    24 Jul 2014 | 3:37 am
    The standard answer, which I've used to end several of my lectures, is "practice, practice, practice." Macnamara et al. suggest there is a bit more to it than that (like genetics....there's no way my piano sight reading ability, obvious at age 6, was due to practice.): More than 20 years ago, researchers proposed that individual differences in performance in such domains as music, sports, and games largely reflect individual differences in amount of deliberate practice, which was defined as engagement in structured activities created specifically to improve performance in a domain. This view…
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    Brain Blogger

  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency and its Neurological Consequences

    Viatcheslav Wlassoff, PhD
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    B complex vitamins are important for various functions of the human body. Be it energy production, body defense mechanisms, or red blood cell formation, the B group vitamins play pivotal roles and carry on the functions by working in tandem or all alone. Vitamin B12, in particular, has a great impact on neurological health. When it comes to neurological concerns, the vitamins B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), biotin, B6 (pyridoxine), folic acid and B12 (cobalamin) are especially important. These B group vitamins have specific effects on brain cell functions and their deficiency…
  • Reading Your Psychotherapist’s Mind

    Richard Kensinger, MSW
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    I am a clinical social worker and faculty member in psychology and community counseling. I came across a provocative article in the New York Times, Wellness section, entitled “What the Therapist Thinks About You”. I am sharing my clinical experience of sharing my notes with the clients I treat. Mental health patients do not have the ready access to office visit notes that, increasingly, other patients enjoy. But as discussed in the article, Mr. Baldwin is among about 700 patients at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center who are participating in a novel experiment. Within days of a…
  • The Hollywood Medical Reporter – To Care or Not to Care?

    Daliah Leslie
    24 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The Hollywood Medical Reporter’s purpose is to examine the influence that film and television has had, and continues to have, on the medical conscious of society. It will do so using a perspective of medical proficiency and media expertise. The first question you may ask is: why? In my introductory post, I touched on the fact that the industry is filled with screenwriters who write about doctors, nurses, hospitals and medical conditions. Most of these writers (both aspiring and professional) have not gone to medical school, and do not have available adequate consultation by professionals.
  • Memories Are Made of These

    Dario Dieguez, Jr, PhD
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Since the early 1900s, scientists have pondered an age old question: what are memories made of? In the 1920s, Karl Lashley embarked on his famous journey to find “the engram” – the place in the brain where memories are stored. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed his famous postulate of how memories could be formed, insisting that brain “cells that fire together, wire together” as part of a “cell assembly.” Since those early days of neuroscience, scientists have worked extensively to characterize brain mechanisms that could support memory formation. The first support for Hebb’s idea…
  • Self-Help for Schizophrenics

    Ann Reitan, PsyD
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    In spite of the existence of stigma, the first crucial step in dealing with schizophrenia is acceptance by that individual that he or she has a mental illness. This acceptance will allow him to deal more effectively with his life and move on with a lifestyle that is perhaps different from that of an ordinary person. Acceptance of one’s mental illness and the life task modifications that are involved in existing as a schizophrenic in the world are essential to dealing with schizophrenia with a modicum of success. Noteworthy is the fact that denial of having a mental illness is likely to be a…
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    Mind Hacks

  • Are women and men forever destined to think differently?

    tomstafford
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    By Tom Stafford, University of Sheffield The headlines The Australian: Male and female brains still unequal The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis: Gender disparities in cognition will not diminish The Economist: A variation in the cognitive abilities of the two sexes may be more about social development than gender stereotypes The story Everybody has an opinion on men, women and the difference (or not) between them. Now a new study has used a massive and long-running European survey to investigate how differences in cognitive ability are changing. This is super smart,…
  • Shuffle Your Mind: Short Film Screenings

    vaughanbell
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:37 am
    If you’re around in London Saturday 2nd August I’m curating a showing of short films about psychosis, hallucinations and mental health as part of the fantastic Shuffle Festival. The films include everything from a first-person view of voice hearing, to out-of-step behaviour in the urban sprawl, to a free-diver’s deep sea hallucinations. There will be a discussion after the showing with film-makers and first-person visionaries about the challenges of depicting altered minds, other inner worlds and the limits of mental health. Tickets are free but you have to book as there are…
  • Seeing ourselves through the eyes of the machine

    vaughanbell
    27 Jul 2014 | 3:21 am
    I’ve got an article in The Observer about how our inventions have profoundly shaped how we view ourselves because we’ve traditionally looked to technology for metaphors of human nature. We tend to think that we understand ourselves and then create technologies to take advantage of that new knowledge but it usually happens the other way round – we invent something new and then use that as a metaphor to explain the mind and brain. As history has moved on, the mind has been variously explained in terms of a wax tablets, a house with many rooms, pressures and fluids, phonograph…
  • Awaiting a theory of neural weather

    vaughanbell
    26 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    In a recent New York Times editorial, psychologist Gary Marcus noted that neuroscience is still awaiting a ‘bridging’ theory that elegantly connects neuroscience with psychology. This reflects a common belief in cognitive science that there is a ‘missing law’ to be discovered that will tell us how mind and brain are linked – but it is quite possible there just isn’t one to be discovered. Marcus, not arguing for the theory himself, describes it when he writes: What we are really looking for is a bridge, some way of connecting two separate scientific…
  • Out on a limb too many

    vaughanbell
    26 Jul 2014 | 4:55 am
    Two neuropsychologists have written a fascinating review article about the desire to amputate a perfectly healthy limb known variously as apotemnophilia, xenomelia or body integrity identity disorder The article is published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment although some who have these desires would probably disagree that it is a disease or disorder and are more likely to compare it to something akin to being transgender. The article also discusses the two main themes in the research literature: an association with sexual fetish for limb aputation (most associated with…
 
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    Neuroethics & Law Blog

  • "The Comparative Advantages of Brain-Based Lie Detection: The P300 Concealed Information Test and Pre-Trial Bargaining"

    Adam Kolber
    29 Jul 2014 | 12:52 am
    See the piece here by John Danaher, forthcoming in the International Journal of Evidence and Proof: Abstract The lie detector test has long been treated with suspicion by the law. Recently, several authors have called this suspicion into question. They...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:28 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): The Trouble With Brain Science, New York Times Opinion Pages In The Popular Press: Does Your Dog Feel Jealous, Or Is That A Purely Human Flaw? National Public Radio Shots Blog Smarter than a First-Grader?...
  • PTSD Treatment and Large Scale Propranolol Trials

    Adam Kolber
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:10 am
    Emily Anthes discusses memory dampening here, including some helpful information about ongoing, large scale trials of propranolol to treat PTSD in those who already have it. Here's an excerpt (footnote omitted): Perhaps, researchers hypothesized, propranolol could weaken emotional memories if...
  • PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)

    NELB Staff
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:39 pm
    Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): The pill to banish painful memories—forget it!, Practical Ethics In The Popular Press: The Moral Hazards and Legal Conundrums of Our Robot-Filled Future, Wired The Trouble With Brain Science, New York Times Opinion Pages Scientists...
  • Tenure-Track Position at U. of Ottawa Faculty of Law

    Adam Kolber
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:43 am
    via Jennifer Chandler: The Common Law Section at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law invites applications for professorial positions. The Common Law Section invites applications for two tenure-track positions, commencing at the level of Assistant Professor. A more experienced...
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    Neuromarketing

  • The 3 Types of Buyers, and How to Optimize for Each One

    Jeremy Smith
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    [Guest post by Jeremy Smith.] I absolutely love buyer psychology and neuroeconomics. Want to know why? ● Because it’s like a secret weapon that produces torrents of conversions (and money). ● Because it’s the only real way to understand why and how buyers make purchases. ● Because it’s the proven route to successful marketing. ● [...]
  • Why Your Website Launch is DOA, Twitter Psychology, & More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:43 am
    Here’s what we discovered this week, with my own new content below: This may not be the most important new study, but it’s certainly one of the stranger ones. Research by professors at the University of California – Riverside found that Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus. I suppose plastic surgery would be [...]
  • A Super-Simple Way to Make Your Prices Seem Lower… With One Catch

    Roger Dooley
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:08 am
    Want to make your prices seem lower without actually changing them? Here's a research-based technique that will do exactly that, with one small catch... it doesn't work equally well for male and female customers!
  • Be Like Bond, Use Persuasion Psychology, and More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    18 Jul 2014 | 7:15 am
    We’re playing catchup after a rare vacation, so here’s the best of the best for the last couple of weeks! Who doesn’t want to be James Bond, at least when he isn’t being tortured by a sadistic villain? I’m sure some 007 movie buff will provide a counter-example, but I don’t recall the fictional secret [...]
  • A Totally Bizarre Way to To Get More Phone Leads

    Roger Dooley
    16 Jul 2014 | 4:14 am
    My recent podcast interview with Brian Massey (@bmassey), aka The Conversion Scientist, had plenty of practical takeaways, but one of my favorites was Brian’s description of a test he ran to boost phone leads. Brian’s firm was charged with trying to turn more visitors into phone inquiries. When they tested different combinations of web lead [...]
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    SharpBrains

  • Study: To fight dementia, fight depression and stress

    SharpBrains
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:13 pm
    “Studies have shown that people with symptoms of depression are more likely to develop dementia, but we haven’t known how the relationship works,” said study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Is the depression a consequence of the dementia? Do both problems develop from the same underlying problems in the brain? Or does the relationship of depression with dementia have nothing to do with dementia-related pathology?”… “These findings are exciting because they suggest depression truly is a risk factor for dementia, and if we can target…
  • News: Launch of Brain Start-up Challenge on August 1st

    Rosemarie Truman
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:49 am
    Dear SharpBrains community, We have read Alvaro Fernandez’s publication regarding the BRAIN Initiative in Venture Beat and thought our first-of-a-kind Brain Start-up Challenge would be of interest to many of you. To provide some background, the National Institutes of Health, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Center for Advancing Innovation and the Heritage Provider Network, have partnered to create a “first of a kind” Brain Challenge. The Challenge will feature 20 rigorously selected brain related inventions that have commercial viability and are important to public health. The…
  • Study: Neurofeedback treatment for ADHD in only 12 sessions?

    Dr. David Rabiner
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:34 am
    Neurofeedback — also known as EEG Biofeedback — is treatment for ADHD in which individuals learn to produce and maintain a pattern of EEG activity that is consistent with a focused, attentive state. This is done by collecting EEG data from individuals as they focus on stimuli presented on a computer screen. Their ability to control the stimuli, for example, keeping the smile on a smiley face or keeping a video playing, is contingent on maintaining an EEG state consistent with focused attention. Overtime, individuals learn to do this during the training; neurofeedback proponents argue that…
  • Shaping the Brain Fitness Movement: Preliminary Summit Agenda unveiled

    SharpBrains
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:30 am
    We are pleased to announce the Preliminary Agenda for the 2014 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (October 28-30th, 2014), featuring these world-class scientists, innovators and practitioners (and more coming soon!). Please consider joining us: Dr. Adam Gaz­za­ley, Direc­tor of the Neu­ro­science Imag­ing Cen­ter at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, San Francisco Aki Niko­laidis, NSF Fel­low at the Uni­ver­sity of Illi­nois Cham­paign Urbana Alex Doman, Co-founder of Sleep Genius Alvaro Fer­nan­dez, CEO of SharpBrains Bill Pren­ovitz, Global Prod­uct and Ser­vice…
  • Why “disorders of the brain” deserve at least equal attention as cardiovascular diseases and cancer

    SharpBrains
    24 Jul 2014 | 4:11 am
    G20 World Brain Mapping and Therapeutics Initiative Partners with EU Human Brain Project (DD&D): “According to the World Health Organization’s large-scale studies, about a third of the adult worldwide population suffer from a mental disorder such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. If also taken together with neurological disorders, such as dementia and stroke, these “disorders of the brain” account for 13% of the global disease burden. This surpasses both cardiovascular diseases (5%) and cancer (10%). Countries with the highest rate of burden included the USA, UK, Russia,…
 
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    BSP Show Notes - Brain Science Podcast

  • "Neurobiology for Dummies" (BSP 110)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    26 Jul 2014 | 11:09 am
    Frank Amthor, PhD: Click image to play BSP 110 Frank Amthor's latest book Neurobiology for Dummies isn't just for readers who are new to neuroscience. In this excellent follow-up to his Neuroscience for Dummies Dr. Amthor discusses a wide variety of brain-related topics. Since I have known Frank for several years it was a special treat to interview him for BSP 110. We talked about a wide variety of ideas ranging from what makes neurons special to how brains differ from current computers.  How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy…
  • John Ratey Returns

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    24 Jun 2014 | 1:00 am
    Richard Manning and John Ratey (click on photo to hear Dr. Ratey's interview) Back in 2008 I interviewed Dr. John Ratey twice: first about his then new book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (BSP 33) and then later about his work with ADHD (BSP 45). Dr. Ratey was one of my favorite guests so I was eager to interview him about his new book Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind. This latest book explores the science behind the current movement to embrace a more healthy lifestyle based on lessons learned from our hunter gatherer ancestors. Since the topic…
  • Avoiding "Neuromania" (BSP 109)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    28 May 2014 | 9:55 am
    I have spent the last 7 1/2 years sharing and promoting neuroscience and while it has been encouraging to see the field grow in popularity, there has also been a disturbing trend toward increased hype. One goal of the Brain Science Podcast is to provide accurate information that helps the average listener enjoy the science and avoid pseudoscience. BSP 109 was inspired by several excellent books that have documented the hazards of what some writers are calling "neuromania" or neurocentrism, which is the tendency to see the brain as the only path to understanding. How to get this episode:FREE:…
  • Consciousness as Social Perception (BSP 108)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    15 Apr 2014 | 1:00 am
    Michal Graziano and Kevin (click image to play interview) In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is testable and it does fit our current knowledge of brain function.In a recent interview for the Brain Science Podcast (BSP 108), Graziano used the…
  • Sleep Science with Penny Lewis (BSP 107)

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    18 Mar 2014 | 4:55 am
    Penny Lewis (click image to play interview) In The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest Dr. Penelope A. Lewis provides a highly readable account of the fascinating world of sleep research. Fascinating research is being carried out with animals as varied as fruit flies and rats, as well as with humans. I was surprised to learn that most people actually find it fairly easy to fall asleep in an fMRI scanner.I have just posted an interview with Dr. Lewis (BSP 107) that includes a discussion of the role of sleep in memory as well as interesting findings about how…
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    Neuronarrative

  • Why Profile Photos Are Liars

    David DiSalvo
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Psychology researchers want us to know something about our profile photo-centrism – it’s a lie, and it’s leading us to draw conclusions that likely have zero basis in reality.read more
  • Can Money Really Buy Happiness? Well, Maybe

    David DiSalvo
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:04 pm
    "Everyone has been told if you spend your money on life experiences, it will make you happier, but we found that isn't always the case," said Ryan Howell, an associate professor of psychology at SF State and co-author of the study. But "extremely material buyers, who represent about a third of the overall population, are sort of stuck." They aren't happy either way.read more
  • How Your Blood Sugar Could Be Wrecking Your Marriage

    David DiSalvo
    8 May 2014 | 5:19 pm
    We’ve all known people who should have to wear a flashing red DANGER! sign if they miss lunch, though even without the warning we instinctively know to steer clear if someone is running on empty. A grumbling stomach means dropping blood sugar, and most of us know that means trouble -- but could the glucose crash be crashing our relationships far more than we realize?read more
  • Which of Us Are the Most Trusting?

    David DiSalvo
    29 Apr 2014 | 8:14 am
    A new study is giving the mistrustful among us something to consider: intelligence strongly correlates with generalized trust. “Generalized trust” in this case refers to a belief that most people can be trusted—that, on average, your fellow man or woman is probably a good egg.read more
  • How Video Games Can Help Us Achieve Mindfulness

    David DiSalvo
    14 Mar 2014 | 7:25 am
    University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers see the new genre of video games as just the beginning of a focus-enhancing revolution in digital tech. Through an initiative called Games+Learning+Society (GLS), they are pioneering efforts that marry entertainment with enrichment, and building it all on a platform of solid science.read more
 
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    NeuroLogica Blog

  • Reward and Punishment in the Brain

    Steven Novella
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:17 am
    In a recent study, scientists looked at the brain with high resolution fMRI scanning while they showed subjects pictures. Following each picture was a painful electric shock, or a money reward, or no response, or a random response. Subjects quickly learned which pictures would be followed by which stimuli – positive, negative, neutral, or unpredictable. Scientists do this sort of thing not because they like to torture people but to study the brain’s response. In this case they were particularly interested in a small deep structure called the habenula. What they found, for the…
  • Dinosaur Extinction Revisited

    Steven Novella
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:24 am
    Sometimes I just have to indulge my childhood fascination with all things dinosaur. Actually, paleontology in general is one of my favorite subjects – reconstructing an utterly alien past, including incredible and strange-looking beasts. And of course, one of the most fascinating aspects of the dinosaurs is that, after 165 million successful years on earth, they suddenly went extinct 66 million years ago. What could cause such a catastrophe? When I was in grade school, the textbooks still contained an outdated (and ridiculous) answer – they ran out of food. Now most people know…
  • Mike Adams is a Dangerous Loon

    Steven Novella
    25 Jul 2014 | 5:14 am
    Where do I even begin? Mike Adams, the self-proclaimed “healthranger” who runs the crank alt-med site naturalnews, has sunk to a new low, even though he was already scraping bottom. Adams combines the worst CAM propaganda with a blend of conspiracy theories from across the spectrum, while selling supplements and other nonsense. He portrays himself as someone who is engaged in a righteous battle against the forces of evil – so hardly someone who is engaged in rational discourse. In a recent rant, however, he has become a parody even of himself. This time he is raving about…
  • Sleep and False Memory

    Steven Novella
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:27 am
    When someone looks at me and earnestly says, “I know what I saw,” I am fond of replying, “No you don’t.” You have a distorted and constructed memory of a distorted and constructed perception, both of which are subservient to whatever narrative your brain is operating under. One of the more dramatic aspects of memory distortion is false memories. These can be completely fabricated memories that are indistinguishable from genuine memories. False memories can involve small details, or entire scenarios. One way to fabricate false memories is with suggestion –…
  • Another Lawsuit To Suppress Legitimate Criticism – This Time SBM

    Steven Novella
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:58 am
    I suppose it was inevitable. In fact, I’m a bit surprised it took this long. SGU Productions, the Society for Science-based medicine, and I are being sued for an article that I wrote in May of 2013 on Science-Based Medicine. My SBM piece, which was inspired by an article in the LA Times, gave this summary: “The story revolves around Dr. Edward Tobinick and his practice of perispinal etanercept (Enbrel) for a long and apparently growing list of conditions. Enbrel is an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis. It works by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor (TNF),…
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    WordPress Tag: Neuroscience

  • Post Of The Week - Friday 25th July 2014

    tombssimon
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:52 pm
    1) Ben Goldacre On Bad Science Here’s Ben Goldacre at Imaging The Future Of Medicine a few months ago talking about bad science. His claims go beyond the issues of mental health which are the focus of this course but he has some useful things to say and a powerful case to make. Medicine makes progress in small steps. To make those small steps, we need to get the science right. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljIlpyvFY1Q&feature=youtu.be&list=PLIwst5wU0-nvS1iNF3djhDt23or1BBobp   2) Tech Will Transform The Patient Doctor Relationship I spend quite a bit of my time thinking…
  • Stacy's Book Note: The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain

    lifejunctions
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:42 pm
    The Secret Life of the Grown-up Brain: The Surprising Talents of the Middle-Aged Mind I was attracte
  • Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s and Reducing the Risk of Causing Tumors

    dgibbons2014
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. Cell therapy for Parkinson’s advancing to the clinic. A decade-long moratorium on the transplant of fetal nerve tissue into Parkinson’s patient will end in two months when the first patients in a large global trial will receive the cells. BioScience Technology did a detailed overview on the causes for the moratorium and the optimism about the time being right to try again. The publication also talks about what most…
  • An Oxford philosopher thinks he can distill all morality into a formula

    Myers
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:02 pm
    He is not the first philosopher to think so, but he “is thought by many to be the most original moral philosopher in the English-speaking world.” Larissa Macfarquhar’s profile of Derek Parfit.  (Until July 21, only subscribers had access to this article on The New Yorker‘s website. It may go back behind the paywall when the magazine sets up a “metered paywall” in Fall 2014.)
  • Myths about the Brain

    Jessamyn Fairfield
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:26 am
    My least favorite brain myth was always the one about the left brain being logical and the right brain being creative. But there are quite a few debunked in this great video:
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    Journal of Neuroscience current issue

  • Abrogation of {beta}-Catenin Signaling in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Reduces Glial Scarring and Promotes Axon Regeneration after CNS Injury

    Rodriguez, J. P., Coulter, M., Miotke, J., Meyer, R. L., Takemaru, K.-I., Levine, J. M.
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    When the brain or spinal cord is injured, glial cells in the damaged area undergo complex morphological and physiological changes resulting in the formation of the glial scar. This scar contains reactive astrocytes, activated microglia, macrophages and other myeloid cells, meningeal cells, proliferating oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and a dense extracellular matrix. Whether the scar is beneficial or detrimental to recovery remains controversial. In the acute phase of recovery, scar-forming astrocytes limit the invasion of leukocytes and macrophages, but in the subacute and chronic…
  • The Role of Flexibility in Personal Space Preferences

    Smith, K. E., Faig, K. E.
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
  • Humans Use Predictive Kinematic Models to Calibrate Visual Cues to Three-Dimensional Surface Slant

    Scarfe, P., Glennerster, A.
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    When the sensory consequences of an action are systematically altered our brain can recalibrate the mappings between sensory cues and properties of our environment. This recalibration can be driven by both cue conflicts and altered sensory statistics, but neither mechanism offers a way for cues to be calibrated so they provide accurate information about the world, as sensory cues carry no information as to their own accuracy. Here, we explored whether sensory predictions based on internal physical models could be used to accurately calibrate visual cues to 3D surface slant. Human observers…
  • Stimulus-Driven Brain Oscillations in the Alpha Range: Entrainment of Intrinsic Rhythms or Frequency-Following Response?

    Keitel, C., Quigley, C., Ruhnau, P.
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
  • Plasticity in the Human Speech Motor System Drives Changes in Speech Perception

    Lametti, D. R., Rochet-Capellan, A., Neufeld, E., Shiller, D. M., Ostry, D. J.
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Recent studies of human speech motor learning suggest that learning is accompanied by changes in auditory perception. But what drives the perceptual change? Is it a consequence of changes in the motor system? Or is it a result of sensory inflow during learning? Here, subjects participated in a speech motor-learning task involving adaptation to altered auditory feedback and they were subsequently tested for perceptual change. In two separate experiments, involving two different auditory perceptual continua, we show that changes in the speech motor system that accompany learning drive changes…
 
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    The Brain Understanding Itself

  • Full Access to inTime Video Series

    Alex Doman
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:58 pm
    During the launch of inTime earlier this year we were very honored to have The Rockefeller University host us in their Science and Lecture Series for inTime: Intercultural Rhythms, Music, Sound and Science. The event was a panel discussion with fellow inTime producers Sheila Allen, Nacho Arimany and me, moderated by neuroscientist Dr. Kamran Fallahpour. Following the panel inTime music composer and multi-instrumentalist Nacho Arimany treated us to an incredible concert of his original world-music compositions. Why am I sharing this with you now? Well, our friends at Ferro Productions and…
  • Forgive me

    Alex Doman
    15 May 2014 | 3:25 pm
      Forgive me, I can’t contain my excitement! After months of hard work by an amazing group of people today we launched the entirely new Sleep Genius app for iOS. And then the most amazing thing happened… It has been featured as a Best New App in the App Store! Personally, I have to  agree with Apple on that point. Can’t sleep like 25% of your family and friends? Check out the app and tell me what you think! Android users, the new app will be in Google play anytime now. Wearables anyone? Sleep Genius seamlessly integrates with Jawbone Up and Fitbit. Note you’ll…
  • Back At It

    Alex Doman
    13 May 2014 | 11:20 am
    Did you miss me? Perhaps you didn’t notice I was gone… Either way, I wanted to share that I’m back at it! Back at what you ask? Blogging… In November I decided to take a hiatus from writing posts so I could focus with a really awesome team of people to launch two exciting products for Advanced Brain Technologies and Sleep Genius. One of these launched in February. It is a rhythm-based music listening therapy called inTime and I must say it is incredible! I couldn’t be happier about the response to it and the stories I am already hearing about the lives it is…
  • On Hiatus

    Alex Doman
    20 Nov 2013 | 10:55 am
    There are periods in life when you are presented with such abundance of opportunity that you have to make difficult choices about where to spend your time. At the moment this is the case for me. The next 3 months will require my laser sharp focus to launch a significant new program from Advanced Brain Technologies while managing other initiatives through the holidays. For now I must let some things go, including posting to my blog, so this is my official notice that I’m on blogging hiatus. I hope you enjoy the holiday season and look forward to reconnecting with you after the…
  • 7 Tips for the Fall Sleep Transition

    Alex Doman
    29 Oct 2013 | 2:36 pm
    Alex Doman KUTV 2 News interview with anchor Ron Bird Are you ready for the time change? This Sunday, November 3rd at 2:00 am will mark the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST) for most of us in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. This is the time of year that our circadian clock becomes disrupted, similar to jet lag, as your body clocks adjust, resetting to a time one hour earlier than you’ve been used to since DST began in March. Some people find this time change difficult, so KUTV 2News This Morning in Salt Lake City invited me in the studio earlier today to discuss some strategies for…
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    Brain Posts

  • Violent Death Rates Increased After Traumatic Brain Injury

    30 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    Anecdotal reports have linked traumatic brain injury with later violent death including death by suicide.Few large epidemiological studies have been published on this association.However, a recent Swedish population study published in JAMA Psychiatry provides valuable insight into this issue.Seena Fazel and colleagues from the University of Oxford, University College London and the Karolinksa Institute examined a large database of over 200,000 patients with TBI.Cases of TBI were identified from all Swedish persons born in or after 1954 who received a ICD diagnosis of TBI.  These…
  • Treating Sleep Problems Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    29 Jul 2014 | 8:15 am
    Sleep problems are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI).In a previous post, I reviewed a study of the risk factors for sleep disorders following TBI.The most severe TBI is a risk factor for hypersomnia. Anxiety and depression following TBI increase risk for insomnia complaints.Few large studies of treatment for sleep problems after TBI exist. However, a recent manuscript outlined the potential benefit of treatment of sleep disorders in a series of 12 subjects.Catherine Wiseman-Hakes and colleagues from the University of Toronto described their experience with sleep and TBI in a…
  • Risk Factors For Sleep Disturbance After Traumatic Brain Injury

    25 Jul 2014 | 8:02 am
    Sleep disturbance following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common clinical challenge.Hypersomnia and insomnia can both been seen in the TBI population.The risk factors related to TBI-related sleep disturbance are not well known. Identification of risk factors can provide insight into clinical assessment and management.Lijun Hou and colleagues recently examined risk factors related to subjective sleep complaints in a series of 98 TBI subjects.The study sample include adults admitted to a one of two Chinese hospitals following a initial episode of TBI. For enrollment, subjects were…
  • Five Top Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury

    23 Jul 2014 | 1:21 pm
    I recently published a list of six top recently published clinical trials in TBI.I want to add to this list five more trials in progress that will be important to follow for results as they are published.A registry of active clinical trials is located on the website www.clinicaltrials.govI reviewed some the recently completed and ongoing clinical trials in subjects with traumatic brain imaging (TBI). Here are five that I think are interesting, innovative and important.Clicking on the trial name will take you to the clinicaltrials.gov website to learn more detailed information.Xbox in the…
  • Cognitive Reserve Boosts Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    14 Jul 2014 | 7:44 am
    Cognitive reserve (high educational attainment, high IQ) is known to reduce or delay the risk for Alzheimer's disease.However, the effect of cognitive reserve on recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied.Two recent research studies support the beneficial effects of cognitive reserve on TBI.Schneider and colleagues examined a series of 769 adult TBI subjects using the TBI Model Systems Database.This cohort was followed during rehabilitation for a period of at least one year.The key outcome measure for this study was the Disability Rating Scale score (DFR).Subject…
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    Psychology Headlines Around the World

  • What Facial Features Matter Most in First Impressions?

    Yahoo News - Science
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:28 am
    Source: Yahoo News - ScienceA computer system that mimics the human brain has identified which facial features most influence how others first perceive a person, scientists say. These findings could lead to computer programs that automatically see which photographs would help people give the best first impressions they can, the researchers added.
  • Matchmaking Site Admits That It Experimented on Customers

    Reuters - Technology
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:28 am
    Source: Reuters - TechnologyOkCupid, a top U.S. matchmaking website, regularly mismatches users to test its technology, the IAC/InterActive Corp service revealed on Monday, weeks after Facebook Inc admitted to misleading users in a psychological study.
  • Dementia Predicted by Slow Walking Speed and Memory Problems

    Google News - Health
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:28 am
    Source: Google News - HealthMedical News Today Dementia 'predicted by slow walking speed and memory problems' Medical News Today Early diagnosis of dementia is critical to delaying the onset of cognitive decline. Now, a new study published in the journal Neurology suggests that a simple test of walking speed and memory could provide just that. Approximately 5.2 million Americans are ... Slow Walking Speed Can Predict Dementia Laboratory Equipment Slow Walking Speed...
  • U.S. Court Strikes Down Virginia's Same-Sex Marriage Ban

    MSNBC - US News
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:18 am
    Source: MSNBC - US NewsThe Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals said the state's laws "impermissibly infringe on its citizens’ fundamental right to marry.".
  • China Has Grown Richer But More Unequal, Says Report

    The Guardian
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:18 am
    Source: The GuardianAbout a third of China's wealth held by 1% of citizens, with disparity greatest between affluent east coast and poorer interior China is becoming more unequal as it gets richer, with about a third of the country's wealth now concentrated in the hands of 1% of its citizens, according to new research.
 
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    The Neurocritic

  • The Neurocritic Critiques Critical Neuroscience

    21 Jul 2014 | 2:46 am
    I wanted to submit a paper for the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Research Topic on Critical Neuroscience: The context and implications of human brain research, but I couldn't decide what I should write about.Could I just submit a blog post like Professor of Literary Neuroimaging that critiqued the entrée of fMRI into Literature Departments?“So literature is abandoning Marxism and psychoanalysis in favor of neuroimaging!! Meanwhile, key neuroimagers have taken up psychoanalysis (Carhart-Harris & Friston, 2010) and socialism (Tricomi et al., 2010).”Would they accept short humorous…
  • Scientology Tropes Enter Mainstream Neuroscience?

    13 Jul 2014 | 8:25 pm
    via @mallelisAt the literary/pop culture/feminist/humor blog known as The Toast, the hilarious Mallory Ortberg has skewered those ubiquitous ads from brain training behemoth Lumosity.The Five Stages Of LumosityStage I – Initiation. . .Friend, are you troubled by persistent waking blackouts? Do you tremble and shudder and flicker out of consciousness when asked to recall basic facts about your acquaintances? Does your right eye fill with blood whenever you have to try to remember your PIN? Let Lumosity patch over those mysterious missing blank spots in your sick and addled mind. “Lumosity:…
  • Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

    10 Jul 2014 | 3:58 am
    In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescribed for schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses.The tachykinin receptors (NK1, NK2,…
  • Welcome to Douglas Coupland's Brain

    22 Jun 2014 | 1:36 pm
    A retrospective of an artist's work gives the viewer insight into their creative process over an extended period of time. In some cases, a retrospective seems to allow access into the artist's mind.Canadian artist and writer Douglas Coupland adopted this stance more literally by creating a room filled with 5,000 objects he collected over 20 years and carefully arranged in a masterwork called The Brain. Coupland is best known (to Americans at least) as the author of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, but his prolific artistic output “over the past 12 years addresses the…
  • The Neuroscience of the Future

    16 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?In the utopian world of The Hedonistic Imperative, an ambitious, admirable (and unlikely) 1995 manifesto by philosopher David Pearce, the goal is to “eradicate suffering in all sentient life” through paradise engineering —  which involves sophisticated applications of nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and psychopharmacology. And going beyond the eradication of…
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    The Neurocritic

  • The Neurocritic Critiques Critical Neuroscience

    The Neurocritic
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:46 am
    I wanted to submit a paper for the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Research Topic on Critical Neuroscience: The context and implications of human brain research, but I couldn't decide what I should write about.Could I just submit a blog post like Professor of Literary Neuroimaging that critiqued the entrée of fMRI into Literature Departments?“So literature is abandoning Marxism and psychoanalysis in favor of neuroimaging!! Meanwhile, key neuroimagers have taken up psychoanalysis (Carhart-Harris & Friston, 2010) and socialism (Tricomi et al., 2010).”Would they accept short humorous…
  • Scientology Tropes Enter Mainstream Neuroscience?

    The Neurocritic
    13 Jul 2014 | 8:25 pm
    via @mallelisAt the literary/pop culture/feminist/humor blog known as The Toast, the hilarious Mallory Ortberg has skewered those ubiquitous ads from brain training behemoth Lumosity.The Five Stages Of LumosityStage I – Initiation. . .Friend, are you troubled by persistent waking blackouts? Do you tremble and shudder and flicker out of consciousness when asked to recall basic facts about your acquaintances? Does your right eye fill with blood whenever you have to try to remember your PIN? Let Lumosity patch over those mysterious missing blank spots in your sick and addled mind. “Lumosity:…
  • Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

    The Neurocritic
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:58 am
    In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescribed for schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses.The tachykinin receptors (NK1, NK2,…
  • Welcome to Douglas Coupland's Brain

    The Neurocritic
    22 Jun 2014 | 1:36 pm
    A retrospective of an artist's work gives the viewer insight into their creative process over an extended period of time. In some cases, a retrospective seems to allow access into the artist's mind.Canadian artist and writer Douglas Coupland adopted this stance more literally by creating a room filled with 5,000 objects he collected over 20 years and carefully arranged in a masterwork called The Brain. Coupland is best known (to Americans at least) as the author of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, but his prolific artistic output “over the past 12 years addresses the…
  • The Neuroscience of the Future

    The Neurocritic
    16 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    Neural prosthetics, brain-computer interfaces (BCI), “closed-loop” deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, and a world without human brain disorders. The first three of these are already here... is the last one possible?In the utopian world of The Hedonistic Imperative, an ambitious, admirable (and unlikely) 1995 manifesto by philosopher David Pearce, the goal is to “eradicate suffering in all sentient life” through paradise engineering —  which involves sophisticated applications of nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and psychopharmacology. And going beyond the eradication of…
 
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    Integrative Law Institute

  • Finding Center Among Chaos–an Integrative Law BFOQ

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    17 Jul 2014 | 11:11 am
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession My colleague Jennifer Tull, a collaborative lawyer from Austin, Texas, is blogging about how to keep your center and sense of purpose while working with clients going through major life transitions.  She writes beautifully and epitomizes the journey toward wholeness that is the hallmark of integrative law.    Here is her first post (we’ll be offering others from time to time): Roller Coaster of Joy Finding center among chaos When I was a kid we would sometimes go to AstroWorld, a now-defunct theme park in Houston.
  • Bad Relationships Can Kill You…

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    7 Jun 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession A study released recently found that stressful relationships directly correlate with high blood pressure in women. “What we observed was as the amount of negativity in relationships increased, risk of hypertension [in women] also increased,” reports  Rodlescia Sneed, co-author of the study.  She and  Sheldon Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University,  looked at data from  1,502 healthy adults over 50 contained in a longitudinal study of more than 26,000 Americans…
  • Men and Women: Our Brains Really Are Wired Differently

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    20 Jan 2014 | 1:24 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession Men from Mars, Women from Venus? Does it make you uncomfortable to think that there really are biological differences in the brains of men and women?  Not me; I’ve seen those differences play out over a lifetime in precisely the ways suggested by a new study  published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.        Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered many more neural connections running from the front of the brain to the back…
  • Why Integrative Law Matters for Divorcing Couples: A Conversation With A Psychotherapist

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    15 Nov 2013 | 3:26 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession   Kate Scharff,a  Washington D.C. psychotherapist, wrote this comment after reading a recent article of mine about Neuro-Literacy for Lawyers, published  in Family Lawyer Magazine: Kate Scharff on August 6, 2013 at 2:54 pm said: Pauline: I’m a mental health professional trained in Object Relations Theory (ORT), an outgrowth of classic analytic thinking. ORT holds with the common-sense notion that we are born with the inherent need to be in relationships, and that our early relational patterns form templates for later…
  • Your Tweets Reveal your Psychological Type to Big Business Advertisers

    Pauline H. Tesler, Director, Integrative Law Institute
    11 Nov 2013 | 3:44 pm
    Integrative Law Institute - Reclaiming Law as a Healing Profession   Your Social Media Posts May Soon Be  Setting You Up to  Buy More IBM to test people’s psychology through Twitter posts – The Times of India. We are just that much closer to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World with the announcement (first published today in the Times of India’s Social Media blog) that IBM is analyzing Twitter users’ posts to mine information about each writer’s personality typology so that ads can not only be targeted for content and location, but also be framed in terms…
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    The Brain from Top to Bottom Blog - Intermediate Level

  • Daniel Wegner: An Unforgettable Scientific Contribution

    Bruno Dubuc
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:48 pm
    For many people, the name of pioneering social psychologist Daniel Wegner will always be associated with a polar bear, because he famously used an image of this animal to demonstrate how hard it is to suppress a thought if someone simply asks you not to think about it. Wegner died on July 5, 2013 at the age of 65 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease characterized by degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord. Acknowledging his passing, the scientific community saluted him as one of the most original thinkers in his field. His friend and fellow psychologist Daniel…
  • Summer school in cognitive sciences 2014 : Web Science and the mind

    Bruno Dubuc
    1 Jul 2014 | 11:54 am
    Every two years, the Cognitive Sciences Institute of the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) holds a summer school on a selected topic in the cognitive sciences. In 2010, the topic was the origin of language, in 2012 it was the evolution and function of consciousness. This summer, from July 7 to 18, 2014, the school will be holding its 5th edition, and the topic will be web science and the mind. The school will be taught and attended by international specialists on the subject of distributed cognition in the brain, between brains, and between brains and computers. The speakers at this…
  • Making the Brain Transparent To Explore It More Easily

    Bruno Dubuc
    16 Jun 2014 | 1:00 pm
    A relatively new technique can now perform the amazing feat of making a mouse’s brain completely transparent (This same technique has been tried on human brains as well, but so far has succeeded in making only parts of them transparent.) But enabling scientists to see through the brain would be merely an interesting curiosity if this technique—dubbed “Clarity” by the team that developed it—did not also preserve the brain’s entire underlying cellular and molecular structure, so that existing methods of staining and tracing nerve bundles can be applied to the brain once it has been…
  • The Variety and Structural Complexity of Neurons

    Bruno Dubuc
    27 May 2014 | 6:53 am
    The purpose of most of the posts in this blog is to summarize recent studies in the cognitive sciences and attempt to make them more accessible—in particular by providing links to selected pages on this website. But the purpose of some of the other posts is simply to draw attention to existing resources on various aspects of neuroscience. Today’s post falls in the latter category. It deals with the neuron and the work by Kristen Harris and her colleagues to reveal it in all its complexity (see the first two links below). Neurons are like any other cells in the human body, except that they…
  • We May Be Able To Have Feelings Without an Insula

    Bruno Dubuc
    12 May 2014 | 2:11 pm
    The insula is a brain structure that lies deep inside the cerebral cortex and so is less accessible for examination. That is why so little was known about the insula for so long, until neurobiologists such as Antonio Damasio demonstrated its role in many human feelings. Because the insula receives so many signals from the strong internal bodily reactions associated with even our slightest emotions, it was seen as perfectly positioned to make us aware of these reactions. That is what Damasio says in a February 2013 article in the journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience, in which he goes on to say…
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    Synaesthesia Discovery

  • Timeline – Growing Up in Australia

    Spring
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:38 am
    Growing Up in Australia is a long term study, conducted in partnership between the Department of Social Services, the Australian Institute of Family Studies and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The study follows the development of 10,000 children and families across Australia. It tries to identify key contributors, such as social, economic and cultural environment, to children’s cognitive development and wellbeing. Since its inception of 2004, Growing Up in Australia has provided policy makers and researchers some very valuable statistics which further influenced government’s…
  • Synaesthesia Marches into the Soccer World Cup

    Spring
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    The early exit of Australian socceroos at FIFA World Cup 2014 has not dampened the nation’s enthusiasm in soccer. Soccer is on the rise to become more and more popular in Australia. Both Skye and Thomas participate in soccer training and soccer games at school. Before the end of last term, Skye’s team represented his school to compete at a regional tournament. Skye’s interest in soccer was developed through his love of an iPad game called Head Soccer. The game involves players from many countries. His synaesthesia very quickly made him see country flags in synaesthetic…
  • Does Synaesthesia Provide Benefits at a Workplace?

    Spring
    24 Jun 2014 | 6:40 am
    Synaesthesia has been commonly recognised as an asset for musicians and writers, but does synaesthesia provide benefits to ordinary people like myself at a workplace? I have been wondering about this question for a while. My work is hectic. Every day, I rush from one meeting to another. Five to six meetings a day is normal. 5pm is the time that I can finally sit at my desk, and start doing my work without much interruption. In the old days, I used to notice my colleagues taking their notepads to meetings, and writing down meeting notes page after page. I felt embarrassed that I hardly ever…
  • Holograms – Smell to Vision and Vision to Smell Synaesthesia

    Spring
    10 Jun 2014 | 5:27 am
    “Vision is the art of seeing things invisible.” ― Jonathan Swift Synaesthetic vision is holographic like vision, according to Skye. Images are multidimensional which can be seen clearly, but are not touchable. While Skye was learning aboriginal history, he always saw a synaesthetic boomerang going around him. It did distract him a bit as he was too busy looking at the boomerang rather than his classroom teacher. On the weekends, children like coming to our bed after they wake up. The smell of our bed triggers off a lime green colour for Thomas. It makes Skye see fire on the bed like…
  • Does the Imagination Age Make Synaesthesia More Attractive?

    Spring
    23 May 2014 | 6:20 am
    The term “Imagination Age” has captured my attention at a technology conference I attended last two days. Some people believe that the period of economy has gone from the Agricultural Age, to the Industrial Age, to now the Information Age, and is transitioning into the Imagination Age. With so much information readily available, the primary creator of economic value for the next period will be Imagination. I think imagination has been a driving force behind the progression of every period in the human history. By calling the next period the Imagination Age will give more focus on…
 
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    Your Brain Health

  • Are music lessons the key to smarter kids?

    Sarah McKay
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:30 pm
    My 4 year-old son Jamie started piano lessons last year. This might seem a little young, but the classes are designed to make learning music fun. Jamie’s teachers use an unique multi-sensory approach that engages the different senses: auditory, visual and kinaesthetic (movement). The kids learn the notes as: do, re, mi, fa, so, etc, and each note has […]The post Are music lessons the key to smarter kids? appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic]

    Sarah McKay
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:36 pm
    › With BIG thanks to EyeWire and Visually.  The post Imagine the human brain was the size of the earth … [infographic] appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience

    Sarah McKay
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Neuroscience seems to offer daily insights into the very core of what it means to be human. But caution is advised. I’m the first to admit its easy to fall into the trap of ‘pop’ neuroscience, neuro-hype, neuro-mania, or ‘mindless neuroscience’. Writing and communicating the complexities and nuances of neuroscience and the brain is hard. There […]The post July Walking Book Club – Brainwashed: the seductive appeal of mindless neuroscience appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • 7 principles of neuroscience every coach should know

    Sarah McKay
    21 Jun 2014 | 5:51 pm
    Kandel’s Principles of Neuroscience Back in the mid 1990s when I was an undergrad, the core text of my neuroscience curriculum was ‘Principles of Neural Science’ by Eric Kandel, James Schwartz and Thomas Jessell. Eric Kandel went on to win the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on memory storage in […]The post 7 principles of neuroscience every coach should know appeared first on Your Brain Health.
  • How to build good habits, make them stick & the awesome power of being boring

    Sarah McKay
    5 Jun 2014 | 2:58 am
    Todays blog post is comes to you from Gregory Ciotti who writes at SparringMind.com where he explores creative work, productivity, habits, and human behaviour. To get his weekly essay on being a little better than you were yesterday, join his free newsletter. And while you’re in sign-up mode and if you want to read MY newsletter, then join […]The post How to build good habits, make them stick & the awesome power of being boring appeared first on Your Brain Health.
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